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General Book Discussions & More => Movies & Books Into Movies => Topic started by: ClassicsAdmin on January 02, 2009, 08:37:58 PM

Title: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ClassicsAdmin on January 02, 2009, 08:37:58 PM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movie2150.jpg)
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?

_______________________________

Books Into Movies Now on DVD (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2moviesDVD.asp)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Books in a Series by Their Authors (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/K_Authors/K_Authors.html)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 05, 2009, 10:25:11 AM
Welcome everyone, to the New Year and to our New Home.  What an exciting time this is for Books into Movies.  Have you seen or read The Reader?  A lot of folks are talking about it.  What are your thoughts?  And then there’s Revolutionary Road and Marley & Me and Doubt (from a play), not to mention Slumdog Millionaire and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.   No doubt with dreams of Oscars dancing in their heads. I feel like my cup is running over.  How about you?

For those who like their films in homestyle comfort,  check out the link above – Books into Movies Now on DVD.

The popcorn is ready,  and there’s lots to talk about.  So come on in and tell us about the books that you want to see.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: hats on January 05, 2009, 06:18:10 PM
Thanks for the link, Pedln. I can't wait to see "The Reader" and "Marley and Me." I have read both those books. I missed the "Revolutionary Road" discussion long ago. I still haven't had the chance to read the book. I would like to read the book before seeing the movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Eloise on January 05, 2009, 06:21:32 PM
Thanks Pedln for opening up a discussion about Books into Movies It will be a very popular discussion I am sure.

Recently I saw Love at the Time of the Cholera and I bought the book, and because we had discussed 100 years of Solitude by Marquez in the old SeniorNet I decided I would go and see the movie. I liked that movie very much, the theme was so different than what usually comes out of Hollywood. They even talked about religion NOT like if it was a disease, but something that the characters felt strongly about. Besides it is also a good love story. I don't want to say too much in case people want to see the movie and read the book. I have just started to read the book so I can't comment on it just now. Marquez is a Nobel Prize winner that needs to be savoured.

Another movie I saw last Friday was The Reader and there again I wanted to read the book because people I know recommended it to me. I loved both which is unusual for me because movies usually leave out too much to be able to compare favourably to the book.

Happy New Reading Year 2009 to everyone.
Those two I highly recommend seeing and reading.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Eloise on January 05, 2009, 06:23:55 PM
Hi! Hats, we posted at the same time didn't we? I did the reverse, I saw the movie The Reader THEN I read the book. It's better like that for me because the movie might be disappointing, but I don't know about you. I liked both.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: hats on January 05, 2009, 06:35:56 PM
Hi Eloise,

It's so good to see your name again and read your post. With "Love in The Time of Cholera" I might try your method. I tried reading the book. I wasn't successful. Maybe seeing the movie will make me look at the book again. I'm glad you liked the movie. I'm going to put it on my queue now.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on January 05, 2009, 08:39:21 PM
Hi, all.  I just found this site.  It is good to see so many familiar names.  I have been down with a virus since the day after Christmas.  My ribs hurt from coughing.  I look forward to feeling better.

I haven't been going to movies for awhile.  Too much violence, and noisy people.  So, I usually wait until I can get a movie from Netflex.  Foreign cinema is my first choice.  People look like real people, not size 0 models.  The story usually is more complex, too.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on January 06, 2009, 08:35:53 AM
I loved Marley and Me as a book, so will try and see the movie. So many books lose so much when they become a movie. Especially if they are made because some star thinks they would be wonderful in it.. I guess ego is a real problem in Hollywood.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 06, 2009, 09:37:51 AM
Welcome everyone, it’s so good to see you all here and to hear what you all think about this new crop of movies from books.  It always makes me happy when the movie powers-that-be think a book or a short story is worth a film production.

Eloise,  I’m happy to read your take on Love at the Time of Cholera, as I could not get into 100 Years of Solitude. (I know I’m in the minority there. Magical realism is not my thing.)  But Love . . .  sounds worth trying.  Let us know how the book compares.  And The REader -- I definitely want to see and read that.

Quote
Maybe seeing the movie will make me look at the book again.
   from Hats

Hats, I agree with you – re:  Love .  .  .  Sometimes seeing the movie first puts a different light on a book you might not otherwise pick up and read.

Sheila,  I hope you get over that bug soon.  In the meantime I hope you can lie back, not too much coughing, and watch your DVDs from Netflix.   I like foreign films, too, as I know I'll always "hear" them with the subtitles.  Read ARound the World will be opening soon, and I'm sure there'll be room for film discussion as well as books.

Steph,  if the film version of Marley and Me doesn’t suit, there’s another dog book into film coming in January, and I think there’ve been previews out on it.  Hotel for Dogs, based on a book of the same name by Lois Duncan.  (I remember her from our school library – a good Young Adult writer, usually with a touch of mystery.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 06, 2009, 12:25:05 PM
I am thrilled that Books into Movies is back with us!! ;D  I always enjoyed that category so much.  So, thanks Pedln for getting us back together.  I read "Love In The Time of Cholera" and watched the movie after.  There was much to like about each one, but I found the book a bit slow-going.  I know we don't have Book Exchange anymore, but I have a copy of "Love... if someone would like to have it.  Just email me with your snail mail address, and I'll send it along for just postage.

I am going to read "Revolutionary Road" and "The Reader", and then hope to see the movie.  They both sound excellent. 

Tomereader
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on January 07, 2009, 08:00:50 AM
Pedlin, Our 13 year old granddaughter is a Lois Duncan fan. I will tell her about the movie. I have been hearing reports on Marley that lead me to believe they dwell a bit much on the death, more than the wonderful exuberant life.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Eloise on January 07, 2009, 08:29:52 AM
re: Love in the Time of the Cholera and The Reader

Tomereader, In both cases I saw the movie first because when I read the book first I am always disappointed with the movie because it leaves so much out.

The Reader gave me a perspective on how the Holocaust is perceived by a non-Jewish German author. This book digs deep in the mind of man from his adolescence to his manhood as he deals with moral and pscyhological issues. It is a short and powerful 218 pages book that you want to read non stop from start to finish.

In contrast, Love in the Time of the Cholera that I am reading now is a book you want to linger on and not rush to turn the page to see what comes next. It is very descriptive and down to earth in easy flowing prose. I didn't follow the discussion "100 years of Solitude" but as it was mentioned before this author seems to dwell too long on matters of the heart and not enough on action. Even if the story seems to linger sometimes I don't want to stop reading it but I am not even half way yet, we will see. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on January 07, 2009, 09:13:58 AM
I saw Marley and Me. The end of the movie is about Marley death. I think they could have left the scene at the Vets when hr was  put  to sleep out. A little scary for smaller kids. but the rest when he was sick and when they said a prayer in the yard where they buried him was a nice family scene and there was nothing wrong with children seeing that kind of emotion. It's real life.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on January 07, 2009, 09:21:46 AM
I try not to compare a movie with the book. I try to take it as two separate things. Lots of stuff gets left out and sometimes more characters get added. People picture what characters look like in the book and then get dissapointed on who plays that part in the film.

Re Marley and Me. Owen Wison with his scaggy blond hair doesn't look anything like John Grogan.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 07, 2009, 10:31:49 AM
HATS, how great to hear from you again!  I  get a lift from every new name I see here from the old group. Seeing your post is like hearing from an old friend after a long absence.

Sheila, you are so right. 
Quote
People look like real people, not size 0 models.
  I've often thought that when watching English movies. The English don't spend hours in make-up trying to remove all the little blemishes and flaws that real people have.  Hollywood still has the idea that heroes and heroines must be one step removed from gods and goddesses.  In appearance, anyway.

 Don't you think that every book with a decent story line and dialogue has a chance at being made into a movie?  There is such a demand for films, and original scripts couldn't begin to fill it.  I suspect every new author's dream is to get a movie contract for his book, and make his fortune.  And every established author hopes fervently that the producers don't ruin his/her book!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 07, 2009, 11:59:43 AM
Tomereader, I think a lot of folks here are being encouraged by the movie to at least take a look at Marquez’s book.  I didn’t like 100 Years of Solitude,  so tend to shy away.  But like Eloise, I’ll probably see the movie before I try the book.  You might put your give away offer over in Book Club Online as Love .  .  .  is one of the books being voted on this week for our February discussion.

Quote
I try not to compare a movie with the book. I try to take it as two separate things.
  from jeriron

That’s a good way to do it if you can, jeriron.  My f2f mystery group read and watched The Good German, set in Berlin right after WWII.  There were several changes made in the film, but the two items actually enhanced each other.  The book provided background on the characters and the newsreel clips in the film gave the reader a better perspective on Berlin at that time. 

But then there are all those films that make you wonder how movie-goers would know what was going on if they hadn't read the book. 

Babi, gods and goddesses – those scraggly young men with 5 days facial hair growth?   :P

Quote
And every established author hopes fervently that the producers don't ruin his/her book!
  from Babi.

Remember the first Elizabeth George novel  shown on PBS several years ago.  It was said at the time that she was very picky about how it was done, which was why none of her works had previously been made into films.  That first one was pretty true, as I recall, but look what’s happened since.  Did she get bought out?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 07, 2009, 06:24:09 PM
[
Babi, gods and goddesses – those scraggly young men with 5 days facial hair growth?   :P
[[/quote] Anyone would think the razor and comb businesses had gone down the tubes.  I mean, no guys comb their hair anymore!  And the facial hair, ugh.  A beard is nice when well trimmed, but this grunge look is awful.  I just imagine that these guys stink to high heaven!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 08, 2009, 09:15:41 AM
And how about that popular new women's hairdo---you know, the one that looks like an old straw broom?  I haven't noticed many scraggly young men with five days of beard;  probably not watching those movies. But I still think we would be astounded to see some 'before and after' pictures of actresses getting the Hollywood make-up and redesign treatment.

  Maybe Elizabeth George signed a new contract after the first book was treated properly.  Or maybe so many people complained about Barbara Haver's appearance that she agreed to the 'improvements'.  Even non-beauties can make the best of what they've got.  It's the false ideas equating beauty with a perceived 'perfection' that annoys me and discourages whole generations of young women growing up.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on January 08, 2009, 12:00:20 PM
Hi, everyone.   I'll try to post here later!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on January 08, 2009, 03:11:24 PM

I had placed Love in the Time of Cholera in my queue and was just notified that it is in the mail.  Didn't read the book.
JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on January 08, 2009, 08:50:15 PM
Checking in.  And, Hats, it's good to see that you found this new site!!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 09, 2009, 09:34:52 AM
Quote
And how about that popular new women's hairdo

Makes me think  -- “and she paid to do that!”

Mippy, Joy, and MaryZ, glad you found your way here.  Lots of neat stuff coming up around us.  Has anyone seen the Benjamin Britten film?  I understand that’s from an F. Scott Fitzgerald story.

And Joy, I’m glad for your uptick about Love .. .. Cholera.  I didn’t know it was already out on DVD.  There’s been so much talk about it lately I just assumed it was a new film.  Javiar Bardem – wasn’t he nominated for some award last year?  Anyway, it’s going on my queue.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on January 09, 2009, 10:41:32 AM
My most recent DVD rental was The Madness of King George.  It's based on a play, not a novel, does that count?  Anyway, it's terrific!

Marley and Me  is already in my rental queue, waiting to be released on DVD.   My hubby hates to go out to movies (don't ask) so I'll have to wait a while to see it.
 I don't care what the reviews say about the movie, I loved the book, gave it to relatives for gifts, and think John Grogan is a terrific writer!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Aberlaine on January 09, 2009, 04:58:27 PM
My f2f book group just finished discussing The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.  We ended up by asking each other if this book would be a good movie.  We all agreed it would.  Then we tried to choose the stars who would best play the characters.  No consensus there!

Nancy
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 10, 2009, 09:31:23 AM
I now have the "Guernsey Literary etc.,..."  from my library, along with about four other books, so I'm not sure when I'll start reading it.  I will, however, take notes so that if it is chosen for discussion, I'll be ready!  I'll see who comes to my mind as potential stars for that one.  One difficulty, however, is that I'm much more familiary with the older stars than the newer ones.  I wonder why that is?  ::)
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 10, 2009, 12:54:27 PM
Welcome Nancy.  I’m kind of like Babi, I only know the older stars .  So who would be a good Dawsey (I can’t remember the names.)  For Sydney – he’s the best friend’s brother?  How about Philip Seymour Hirsch?  And I want Tyne Daly (she is still alive, isn’t she) for that very blunt, big-hearted woman who meddles.

Well Mippy, it is very nice to be able to put your feet up, stretch out, and/or take a break during the movie.  That’s my main way of viewing because I don’t catch the dialog well enough in the theatre, and nothing here is captioned or subtitled.  The last foreign flick to play in my town was Pan’s Labyrinth.  But I do love a big screen every onece in a while, soI try to take advantage of visits to my New York daughter.  On my last visit I saw Tell No One, which is a recent French film, based on the book by Harlan Coban.  A good thriller for a movie.  I haven’t read the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Aberlaine on January 10, 2009, 01:06:18 PM
I love Sean Connery and if I were the director, I'd find a spot for him in the Guernsey film!   ~ Nancy
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 12, 2009, 10:36:37 AM
Last night was a big night at the Golden Globes, especially for the film Slumdog Millionaire.  I had heard that it was from a book, but did not know any more, so did a little research, and here is one link:   Slumdog Millionaire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vikas_Swarup)


Q and A, on which the film is based, is Vikas Swarup’s first novel.  His second novel, Six Suspects, was released this summer and has been optioned for a film (whatever that means.)

Are there any Elmore Leonard fans out there?  I had never read an Elmore Leonard until a few years ago because I always remembered the comments of an elderly gentleman from my church.  I would run into him periodically in the mystery section of the public library and we would chat about various mystery writers.  He was a great Elmore Leonard fan.  “But,” he said, “I would never want Dorothy (his wife) to read him,”  which, in my naïve younger years interpreted that his books were a little hard core.

But a few years back a film company came to Cape Girardeau to shoot scenes from Leonard’s Killshot.  With that, my f2f group read the book, and it was not bad.  The author had even researched well Mississippi River barge companies, which played a part in the book.  The film has been an up and down thing and the scenes shot in my town are now said to be almost non-existent. But it is being released Jan 23 in a few select cities – not here, as we are not select enough.  If you should see it,  don’t look for me, as I did not go downtown that day.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pike99 on January 13, 2009, 09:47:29 PM
Turner Classic Movies (TCM on cable)always shows a lot of older films that were made from books. Remember,back in the "old days" lots of classics were turned into films. One of the best adaptations was "From Here to Eternity".. You can go to TCM's web site and check the schedule. I always liked Picture of Dorian Gray. I still think Gone With The Wind is a classic. When you think of how these films were made without computer generated images ,you can really appreciate the artistry that went into film making.
   Does anyone think that seeing a movie of a book first ,is an impetus to reading the book? As an aside, I can remember reading Classic Comics and then being so interested that I would read the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 14, 2009, 09:02:14 AM
 Hi Pike, welcome, glad you found us.  Are you from Seattle?  I’m asking because of your name – Pike’s place market and highway99 (Aurora)

Quote
Does anyone think that seeing a movie of a book first ,is an impetus to reading the book? As an aside, I can remember reading Classic Comics and then being so interested that I would read the book.
  (from pike99)

If it was a really good movie, yes, because I’d want to know more, especially background material that the screenwriters couldn’t include.  The so-so movies, not so tempted.  And that’s how I’m feeling right now about Plain Truth, the film and book about the Amish family.  I have Jodi Picoult’s book on my bookshelf, and the movie was okay, but not outstanding.  And who wrote We Were the Mulvenys – I saw that film a long time ago, and have had the book for years, but so far not tempted to read it.

On the other hand, has a bad book ever turned into a good movie?  I hated Bee Season, tried the movie and found it just as bad.

Now Nancy, just where are you going to put Sean Connery?  I can't believe I've forgotten their names already -- but, the grandpa, maybe?

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 14, 2009, 09:49:14 AM
Most of our old favorite actors and actresses would have to play the older roles now, wouldn't they?  There are a number of newer generation actors that I like, too, of course.  I just don't recognize all of them by name.  (That's my fault, not theirs!)
   I saw an old re-run of Northern Exposure recently,  and was startled to realize that the good-looking young doctor was now the FBI brother on 'Numbers'.  And I had to laugh when I learned that the cynical genius doctor of "House" was also the none-too-bright Bertie Wooster of "Wooster and Jeeves".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Aberlaine on January 15, 2009, 11:28:18 AM
I'd love to put Sean Connery in the character of Dawsey Adams, the love interest in the story.  But I think he's too old for the character.  He's charming and honest and quaint, just like Dawsey Adams.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 15, 2009, 06:35:14 PM
Over in Read Around the World, MarjV was telling about a movie she received from Netflix, The Stone Angel, based on the novel by deceased Canadian author, Margaret Laurence.

"In ninety-year-old Hagar Shipley, the restless, crotchety, and proud protagonist, Laurence creates a memorable character who reveals what it is like to be very old, physically frail, dependent on others, and tormented by memories of the past. Laurence also movingly depicts the sudden dawning of realization in Hagar's mind of where she has gone wrong in life, and what has been the cause of her unhappiness. "

This is new to me.  Has anyone seen it, or read Laurence’s book with the same title?

"The Stone Angel is also a realistic portrayal of life in the prairie towns of western Canada from the late nineteenth century to the Depression of the 1930s and beyond"
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: hats on January 17, 2009, 08:33:23 AM
Joyce Carol Oates wrote "We Were The Mulvanneys." I haven't seen the movie. I loved the book. It's about a whole family dealing with one terrible, terrible incident that happens to one of them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: hats on January 17, 2009, 08:43:08 AM
Hi Babi,

The same here-
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: bellemere on January 19, 2009, 04:49:11 PM
I didn/t see the Broadway play "Doubt" but I found the movie riveting!  the tension between the nun and the priest was crackling!  I can just imagine how, on a live stage, it would be even more so.  but the fact that the playwright, John Patrick Shanley, also did the screenplay was a big plus.  Even the artistic direction supported the theme of doubt,' the wind as a metaphor for rumor,; the opening and closing of windows and doors; the stuffy atmosphere of the old scholl and convent!  Loved it!   if he ever has another play on Broadway, I will find a way to get there, for sure.
Did anyone see both?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 19, 2009, 05:48:28 PM
That's interesting, Bellemere, that both play and screenplay were written by the playwright.  And I find now that he also directed the film.  An article in Wikipedia states that it's in his contract that not a word of his screenplay can be changed.  (Would that there be more examples of that.)  At any rate, I'm glad you liked it and I look forward to seeing the movie when it comes out on DVD.

He asked his first grade teacher, Sister Peggy, to be the film's technical consultant, as he had no idea how nuns behaved in the convent.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on January 19, 2009, 09:47:20 PM
He asked his first grade teacher, Sister Peggy, to be the film's technical consultant, as he had no idea how nuns behaved in the convent.

I love that.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 20, 2009, 09:41:08 PM
John Mortimer very recently passed away. You may remember him for Rumpole of the Bailey.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-mortimer19-2009jan19,0,3493093.story
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 21, 2009, 09:33:34 AM
I've seem some previews of  "Doubt", and had already decided I want to see the film. I'll have to wait until it's available at Netflix, tho'.

  I'm sorry to hear of John Mortimer's passing, tho' not surprised.  I understood his health was poor.  I did so much enjoy his portrayal of Rumpole.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 24, 2009, 03:22:19 PM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movie2150.jpg)
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?

_______________________________

Books Into Movies Now on DVD (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2moviesDVD.asp)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Books in a Series by Their Authors (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/K_Authors/K_Authors.html)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 24, 2009, 03:32:00 PM
I've just been looking at the latest Bookmarks again and guess what's coming soon --

Alice Sebold's  Lovely Bones  (in March) with Rachel Weisz (I don't know her), Susan Sarandon -- would she be the mother, and Mark Wahlberg.  (I don't know him, either)

Then in February -- Sophie Kinsella's Confessions of a Shopaholic, with Isla Fisher and Hugh Dancy.

Guess I don't know these newer stars.  Takes a while.  I was pleased when I finally recognized such folks as Laura Linney and Phillip Seymour Hoffman.

Have any of you heard anything about these films?

Has Elmore Leonard's Killshot played in your town?   ;D  I have to know about that one.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 25, 2009, 10:23:45 AM
I've seen some previews on TV about the upcoming "Confessions of a Shopaholic".  It looks like there will be plenty of 'broad' comedy in this one. You know, like women brawling over a sales item.
  I do recognize Susan Sarandon. She isn't really new. I believe she is probably best known for "Thelma and Louise", which I did not see.  The name Mark Wahlberg I've seen before, but I don't know anything about him.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 25, 2009, 11:59:33 AM
What is so amazing to me is the number of actors, who have labored long and hard in the field, and are just now getting recognition for their acting abilities; i.e., Phillip Seymour Hoffman, the fellow who starred in "Breach" Chris Cooper, the wonderful Laura Linney, who has appeared in about half dozen movies of late including Breach, John Adams, The Savages, etc.

Has anyone else noticed this?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 25, 2009, 12:33:12 PM
I got curious about Mark Wahlberg because I see his name mentioned often and I couldn't place him. I still can't. It turns out the only movie I saw him in was Renaissance Man (w/Danny DeVito, 1993). I marvelous movie, IMO.

If you have seen the two Mummy remakes with Rachel Weisz, you have seen her. She was also in Constantine. I haven't seen that one yet.

The IMBD website listed 98 movies (beginning in 1970) in which Susan Sarandon played. Surely I've seen a bunch of those, but no, I only recognized a few I have seen. I liked her in White Palace with James Spader. She was also in Witches of Eastwick which was a fun movie. I've seen Thelma and Louise, but don't have an urge to watch it again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 25, 2009, 02:42:37 PM
Frybabe, Updike has a new book out -- The Widows of Eastwick --  a new stage of life for the Witches.  I wonder if they'll make a movie of that.

One of my favorite Laura Linney films (and I haven't seen too many) is Jindabyne, sort of mystery, set in Australia. Beautiful scenery, too.  It's based on a Raymond Carver short story. And now the public library has just notified me that they're holding the John Adams DVD, with her and Paul Giamatti.  I think she won Golden Globe best actress for her part in that.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 25, 2009, 04:50:47 PM
Thanks for the heads up, Pedln. Think I will get both volumes when the new one come out.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on January 26, 2009, 10:20:57 AM
Susan Sarandon was in Clockwork Orange

And she was in another with Goldie Hawn - I can't think of the title - they played two 'older' hippies - Hawn was still a hippie type and Sarandon had morphed into a straight laced wife and mother. They come together again after many years....with predictable consequences but fun all the way. The title will come...eventually
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 27, 2009, 09:25:19 AM
(sigh  I have read all the posts since my last one, and realize I haven't seen a single one of the movies y'all have listed.  It now occurs to me that between the time of the initial decline in my hearing, and the appearance of Netflix with closed captioning, my moviegoing was very limited.
  However, I have enough to do trying to read as many as possible of the good books people recommend.  I can't watch all the movies I missed, too.  :-\ ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: HaroldArnold on February 01, 2009, 12:11:08 PM
.The other day I saw "Slumdog Millionare" at a new theater at the sprawling REM Mall off I-10 in Northwest San Antonio.  I was with 4 or 5 of my contemporary Chandler neighbors.  It was a curious way to put a picture together, with strange camera angles, gargantuan scene enlargements, and explosive bursts of dialog and sound effects.   Immediately after its conclusion I was asked what I thought of the movie.  Spontaneously I replied, "At the ripe old age of 82, I've just had my first LSD trip."  Yet somehow I enjoyed the movie.  It was a film I will remember
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Eloise on February 01, 2009, 12:36:02 PM
I saw Slumdog last week. Well for me when there is that much noise, explosions, running from the bad guy, violence, child abuse, violence of every kind it overshadows the love story behind the special effects and I come out of there trying to forget it as quickly as possible. Like Arnold said I am too old for that kind of excitment.

There are a few that I liked the book as well as the movie and Love at the Time of the Cholera is one of them although the movie was better IMO. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 01, 2009, 02:57:32 PM
Harold, that’s one for the books. 
Quote
"At the ripe old age of 82, I've just had my first LSD trip."  Yet somehow I enjoyed the movie.  It was a film I will remember
I’ll take that as a recommendation.

Eloise, I won’t hear the noise and explosions, as I find digital sound difficult to listen to, so I don’t wear my hearing aids and just go with the captions. But at least you have forewarned me about the violence, which I don’t like.

I’ve put Love in the Time of Cholera on my Netflix queue.  Haven’t read it.  I did not like the book 100 Years of Solitude, so have kind of shied away from the author..

The John Adams DVD consists of three discs, of which I’ve watched one.  Laura Linney is just superb here.  Giamatti does well, too, but I am having trouble keeping all the characters straight.  I think it’s a set I’d like to own, to be able to go back and repeat certain scenes, and not to have to watch it all at once.  But I did get it renewed for another week.  It’s based on David McCullough’s book about John Adams.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Ella Gibbons on February 01, 2009, 06:42:38 PM
I didn't know SLUMDOG was a book!  Has anyone read it and how does it compare to the movie?  Is there any truth to the movie?  Any little "truth?"

I went with my daughter to the movie and we had very different opinions.  She liked it, I thought it was a bit too "much" drama and it took too long to get to the heart of the story.  The producers must have liked poverty and violence and the mistreatment of children, etc.

Actually I felt sorry for the whole country of India when we sit comfortably in our movie house with our popcorn and watch such poverty illustrated and then can say afterwards that it was entertaining!  Are the scenes of cities true to life?  Is "rich" America doing it again?

No, I didn't like the movie at all.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 01, 2009, 07:39:25 PM
I don't know if it's based on any book or not, but a movie you might enjoy is Outsourced.  It's about a young American male who is sent to India to manage a call center there.  Mainly, it's about all of us trying to understand and appreciate cultural differences.  It's light, it's pleasant, it's worth watching.

I enjoyed The Namesake, both book and movie.  No violence there, that I remember. Water was an excellent film, about widows in India during the 1930's.  While there was no out and out right violence that I remember, there were some very unnerving scenes. I'll never forget the happy eight-year-old widow, going into a rather opulent house, saying "Hello, I'm here to play with you."  The book by Indian writer Mistry, A Fair Balance, has left me with some horrifying scenes, but it was still an excellent book, and I'm glad I read it.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 02, 2009, 09:27:02 AM
Thanks for the movie reviews.  With a sigh of relief, I will be able to avoid "Slumdog".   :P
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: kiwilady on February 02, 2009, 07:27:43 PM
The slums in India truly are awful and they most certainly exist. My DILs Parents lived and worked in India for many years and still work on short term contracts there to this day. Despite the progress made in India there is still a massive gap between rich and poor. We cannot imagine the poverty. Its not made up and if it makes us feel uncomfortable to see it on the silver screen- it should!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 03, 2009, 02:07:10 PM
A goofy little website, that I get emails from, just this morning mentioned a new release of a movie, which I love:  "Far From the Madding Crowd" with Julie Christie.  I haven't seen it in years, and I would assume that they have restored it for DVD.  Gonna put it on my Netflix list.  Right now the author's name escapes me (CRS).  When I can think of it, I shall return and post it, but I feel certain that most of you here will know it right off the top of your heads! ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 03, 2009, 02:15:14 PM
Author is:  Thomas Hardy
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: kiwilady on February 03, 2009, 07:24:54 PM
That was a good book. I enjoyed it. Have not seen the movie.

Carolyn
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 04, 2009, 08:53:58 AM
I read that book so long ago I don't even remember what it was about. I do remember I liked it better than some other Hardy novels. Maybe I should put the movie on my list, too.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 06, 2009, 09:56:37 PM
Tomereader, is this the first DVD for Far FRom the Madding Crowd?  Netflix doesn't say, but Amazon does show this 2009 release to have English and French subtitles, which some of us need. When you get it, could you note that?  Quite a few of Hardy's works have been made into film, including a couple of Tess D'ub.  The only Hardy I've read was Jude the Obscure, eons ago in a lit class.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ALF43 on February 07, 2009, 09:38:13 AM
Oh Glory!
 Pedln  is here with our old tried and true subject of book/movies.  I am so happy to see all of the familiar faces.  I've not been to the movies in a couple of months and last Wednesday three friends and I decided to go to see Slumdog...

The movies theatre had burst a main water line and we were turned away with a free pass for each of us, in hand.  Next week, I am there!!! ;D

A movie has to be pretty bad for me to disike it.  Movie production amuses me (as do  theatrical ones.).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 07, 2009, 10:59:56 AM
Pedlin, I think the new release of Far From... is just an upgraded version, same cast as the original release.  It will be a few days before I get my copy from netflix, but I'll let you kknow if it has subtitles.

Tess of the D'Urbevilles is also one of my favorite movies.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 07, 2009, 05:28:14 PM
For anyone who is interested in movies of Thomas Hardy's novels, I strongly recommend the TV version of "The Mayor of Casterbridge" with Ciaran Hinds and James Purefoy, available from Netflix.  I hadn't yet read the book when I first saw it, but Hinds, in the title role, did an incredible job of showing you what that black, tortured character was about, getting your sympathy for the parts of him that deserved it.  Purefoy is also excellent.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Eloise on February 08, 2009, 04:51:59 AM
Pedln, I havn't read 100 Years of Solitude because from what I heard about the book I knew I wouldn't like it and that's why I hesitated seeing the movie and reading 'Love at the Time of the Cholera'.

I am glad I saw the movie first, the book is a little slow but I still liked it. It is poignant love story with superb writing.  I loved the theme song of the movie. I say don't hesitate to see the movie then decide if you want to read the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 08, 2009, 10:40:39 AM
PatH Seems we like lots of the same things...the Ciaran Hinds Mayor of Casterbridge is one of my favourites. What an actor that man is - did you see him in Veronica Geurin sp?- a film about the Irish reporter who uncovered a drug ring the police don't want to touch - true story/disturbing but brilliant film. Hinds in his frequent dark, troubled mode. He was also great as Captain Wentworth in  Persuasion.

Tonight we watched a 2 hour episode of Cranford with Judi Dench et al. I know many here watched it  last year on your PBS programme and discussed it on the other site.  I thought it excellent although it amalgamates parts from more than one of Elizabeth Gaskell's stories. I was racking my brains trying to think just where this character and that fitted into the novel Cranford and then realising they were drawn from other books.  But an excellent programme nonetheless.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 08, 2009, 05:46:19 PM
I am so concerned about our "Gumtree" who lives in Australia...those horrific fires there.  I don't know what part of Australia she lives in, or what part of the continent the fires happened in.  My prayers are certainly with those people who lost everything, and to the families who lost their relatives.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 09, 2009, 08:34:36 AM
Tomereader Don't be concerned - Here I am, alive and kicking...I got your message and sent a reply but then lost it again so can't see if you received it.
The bushfires are in south-eastern Australia - South Australia, NSW and Victoria which is the worst affected. The death toll seems to rise hourly and the destruction of stock and property devastating to everyone. There are heart rending stories of people who got out in time - and sadly those who didn't.
I live on the western coast and though there are fires in this state as well they are under control and contained -at least for the moment.
It's been a worrying time as we have family members living in the eastern states - my son and DIL live on Sydney's north shore where an arsonist lit a fire just for fun! They're OK. We also have extended family and more distant relatives scattered throughout rural areas in Victoria. We can only hope and pray for their safety.
The nation is in shock but united in its response to help the victims of this tragedy.
Thanks for caring -

 GUM
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 09, 2009, 10:07:06 AM
GUM, I do hope the authorities can find the arsonists.  That sort of crime in such a dry country is nothing short of murder! 

  I ordered the DVD of Cranford, but was disappointed to find that it did not have closed captioning.  So many of the British productions do not.  I could see that it is the sort of thing I really enjoy, so it was especially aggravating not to be able to understand what was being said.  I do wish all films had closed captioning.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 09, 2009, 07:40:28 PM
Speaking of poverty in India, has anyone read THE WHITE TIGER by Atavind Adiga?  (Not a movie, at least, not yet)  It's a darkly comic novel.  I was fascinated by it.  A young man describes his rise from a place he calls "The Darkness," an area of rural India where corruption is rife, education and electricity are equally scarce, clean drinking water and adequate sewage don't exist and life is cheap, to become an entrepreneur owning a fleet of taxis, by his own initiative as well as a "necessary" murder.   
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 10, 2009, 08:40:08 AM
I think that book was also mentioned in RATW.  Unfortunately, my library has 2 or three books entitled "The White Tiger", and none of them by that author.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: hats on February 11, 2009, 12:15:32 PM
I finished "Stardust" by Neil Gaiman. I really enjoyed it. It's Fantasy. Now, I want to see the movie. Have any of you seen the movie?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: hats on February 11, 2009, 12:21:03 PM
I have also reread "The Secret Life of Bees" by Sue Monk Kidd. It's such a wonderful book. Now, I'm waiting for the movie to arrive.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 12, 2009, 08:42:01 AM
I loved "The Secret Life of Bees", too.  I thought they had made a movie of it recently, though.  Or did I just read that they were going to?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 12, 2009, 11:32:59 PM
I was wondering about that too, Babi.  I think the movie came out this fall, but that the DVD is just now being released.  Time Magazine gives it a wonderful review, can't speak highly enough of Dakota Fanning's ability and also Queen Latifah, Jennifer Hudson and Sophie Okonedo -- quite an all-star cast there.

Just learned a surprising thing in the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society discussion, which brings up a lot of different books  to comment on.  ONe of the authors featured is Elizabeth von Arnim whom I'd never heard of before.  Come to find out, I had one of her books on the shelf -- Enchanted April, and the night before last, I taped the movie on TCM.  Have not yet read or seen either, but it comes highly recommended.  Netflix lists the DVD as Saved, release date unknown.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 13, 2009, 08:44:55 AM
Enchanted April is a wonderful movie.  I loved it!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Annie on February 19, 2009, 09:10:13 AM
I was reading all of the posts here about a week ago and saw that folks were listing movies with Susan Sarandon.  IMHO, her movie with Kevin Costner, "Bull Durham" was a good comedy.  Also, we enjoyed "Safe Passage" with Sarandon and Sam Shepherd was another.  These are older movies but worth watching.
We watched a Netflix movie last night, "The King and I" with Deborah Kerr and ????.  It was a delight.  The children used in the story were so beautiful.  Does anyone know if Siam is now Thailand???  I have a friend here in Columbus who is now in Cambodia attending her son's wedding.  He has married a young lady from that country.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on February 19, 2009, 09:45:52 AM
Siam is now Thailand - has been for a long time.  Turner Classic Movies ran TK&I last week, uncut and without commercials.  It's one of my favorites, and it was a treat to see it all the way through.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 21, 2009, 10:02:36 PM

We watched a Netflix movie last night, "The King and I" with Deborah Kerr and ????.

The ??? was probably Yul Brynner, who played the King.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on February 24, 2009, 12:36:06 AM
Just picked up Margaret Atwood's A Handmaid's Tale at my used book store. I had seen the movie years ago. The bookstore owner had read the book and stated that the movie, although good, did not do the book justice. The movie, said she, gave her the impression of something that could happen; the book made her feel as though the events were imminent, absolutely chilling. It is on her highly recommended list.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 24, 2009, 06:58:42 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movie2150.jpg)
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?

_______________________________

Books Into Movies Now on DVD (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2moviesDVD.asp)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Books in a Series by Their Authors (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/K_Authors/K_Authors.html)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)



Frybabe Your bookshop owner was absolutely right in regard to Handmaid's Tale. Atwood depicts things which could very easily happen right now - chilling is the word - I couldn't believe how real I found some of the events in parts of this book. Let's know how you respond to it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 24, 2009, 08:36:05 AM
That book title sounds familiar, and I think I've read it, but I don't remember the story line.  Didn't Atwood write some other books with similar titles?  Some medieval character's 'Tale'? 
  FRYBABE, can you give me a brief summary of the story line of "The Handmaids Tale", to jog my memory?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 24, 2009, 10:52:42 AM
Frybabe and Gum, you're absolutely right -- CHILLING is the word for this book, and some of this is going on -- when you think of the Taliban in some of those isolated areas.

Babi, Frybabe  can give you a better summary than I, but basically, women lost their rights overnight -- they could no longer read, their bank accounts were frozen and they could no longer handle money.  I don't remember much more other than those who didn't comply were sent to work in toxic waste dumps.

I don't think I could or want to see the movie -- 1990 with Natasha Richardson.  It would be very tense.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on February 24, 2009, 02:26:25 PM
Pedln, Atwood combined an ultra-fundamentalist religious beliefs with politics and sex. BTW, my bookseller told me that Atwood wrote The Handmaid's Tale just after the fall of the Shah of Iran.

I don't remember the toxic waste dump bit, but they may not have emphasized that in the movie. I wasn't even sure where this was supposed to take place. I also am fuzzy as to why the wives could not have children, although I had the impression it was the result of some nuclear event. Will find out when I read the book. The heroine of the story is Offred, who being fertile is assigned to the Commander (played by Robert Duvall in the movie) and his wife to produce a child. It is assumed that the wife is the one who is infertile when in fact it is the Commander. While doing her "duty" and keeping the Commander entertained, she continues to try to locate her husband and daughter, she discovers the fate of some of the other women with whom she became acquainted after she was captured and while she was in training to be a Handmaid, she discovers the resistance movement and the female underground railroad. I took a quick look at the ending. I do not think the ending of book is the same as the movie. 

Whenever I read about or hear about the privileges those in power enjoy while at the same time prohibiting (and prosecuting) the general population from same, I think of George Orwell's famous line in Animal Farm: "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 25, 2009, 09:04:27 AM
Brrr!  Thank you, Pedln.  That is definitely not the book I was thinking of, nor is it a book I want to read.  I appreciate the warning. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 08, 2009, 12:33:37 PM
Good Morning.  Good grief, it's March already.  What happened to the first week?

A Bookmarks Magazine ago it said that the film based on Alice Sebold's The Lovely Bones was going to be released in March.  Has anyone heard anything about it?

Or about Confessions of a Shopaholic by Sophie Kinsella?  The was supposedly due out in February.

I watched Alan Drury's Advise and Consent the other night.  The political shenanigans are what go on all the time, but in other respects, it just seemed kind of dated.

What books have you seen lately?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on March 09, 2009, 07:29:27 AM
"The Shopoholic" movie is already out in theatres.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on March 11, 2009, 02:37:50 PM
I am new to Netflix, and have a question-------How can you see before ordering if the movie
has Closed Captioning????? I have a hearing problem and SO much of the movie without CC, even though I have an expensive set of "hearing ears".
Joy
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on March 11, 2009, 02:42:45 PM
Edit: "miss so much ' left out  :'(
Re: Secret Life of Bees----- I read the book when it came out several years ago and recently saw the DVD (Netflix does have it).  IMO the movie does not COMPARE with the book.  I thought it was kind of "soapy".
JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 12, 2009, 11:15:23 AM
Joyous, we're so glad you found us here, and don't you love Netflix.  You're asking about captions at the right place.  That's my middle name, and for a few others here as well.

If on Netflix, if you go to the site that actually summarizes the film, has reviews, lists the actors, you should also see captions or subtitles listed, if they have them. Occassionaly they forget to include that information, and then I jump their case, which of course doesn't do anything at all.  If it's a film I really want to see, I'll look up the title at Amazon and see if they say anything about captions or subtitles.

Some of the newer DVDs now seem to use the symbol SHD (or maybe SDH) rather than CC (subtitles for deaf or hard of hearing.)

I haven't read or viewed Secret LIfe of Bees, though the book is on my shelf.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 13, 2009, 08:53:48 AM
Do read it, PEDLN.  "The Secret Life of Bees" is that rarity, a book with some unique scenes and people.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: lucky on March 14, 2009, 08:33:57 PM
One of my all time favorites is "A Tree Grows In Brooklyn", the original version with Dorothy McGuire, Peggy Ann Garner and James Dunn.  The book is also a favorite of mine perhaps because I grew up in Brooklyn.  This film version was an excellent version of the book.  If you want to see an excellent film with excellent acting I recommend it.  I don't know if it available on Net Flix.  Every once in a while FMC ( Fox Movie Channel)  shows it. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 15, 2009, 10:52:29 AM
Lucky, I loved "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn," too.  It apparently is not yet out in DVD --  Netflix has it listed and it can be "saved" as it is unavailable.  I've got it down there in my saved pile.

Where in Brooklyn did  you grow up?  My daughter has lived there for two years now, Prospect Heights, not far from the Museum and Library.  She loves it and is trying to buy a condo there. She rides her bike to work in lower Manhattan every day.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: lucky on March 15, 2009, 04:19:14 PM
Hi Pedlin

I grew up in Williamsburgh, Brooklyn.  I am familiar with Prospect Heights.  The Brooklyn Museum has a good Egyptian collection and the library was one of my favorite places to go.  It's been a long time and I have forgotten the name of the library.  The area also encompasses Prospect Park which had a beautiful botanical garden.  I would often take my mother there.  She knew the name of every tree and plant  (not in English, but Hungarian) and she especially loved the Japanese garden.  In the summers of long ago my father would take me to the band concerts in the park.  It was lovely place to spend a Sunday afternoon. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: BarbStAubrey on March 15, 2009, 09:33:45 PM
Wheee a NEW DISCUSSION - in fact an whole new area of discussion - we pushed this through quickly - this was ONLY thought about the past Tuesday or Wednesday but  here we are - as soon as I have links or know how to use them I will bring the links to this discussion

The discussion is a two for -  yep a twin discussion - the main discussion will be to explore Humor Wit and Satire in Literature but to narrow it down we chose the short story -

Each middle of the month there will be a new short story to read ON-LINE that encapsulates either Humor Wit or Satire or all three - lots of great authors like Mark Twain and Wells and Eudora Welty - the list goes on - and so for 10 days each month we will explore one of these short stories while learning  how writers make  us laugh or get a message across without beating us over the head by using satire or their wits using language.

I am really excited and hope you will look in - WE START TOMORROW - can you believe TOMORROW - and the sun comes up tomorrow as the song goes - we strike while the iron is  hot around here - and the story is - tra la la laaa - a P.G.Wodehouse story - do I see a smile already? - one of his early Bertie Wooster and Jeeves tales called  Jeeves in the Springtime (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=352.0) -

As y'all know there was a TV series and an English move of the Bertie Wooster and Jeeves escapades -  so why not look in and read where the original came from - hope to see you tomorrow.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 15, 2009, 10:07:00 PM
Barbara, thank you for telling us about your new series about Wit and Humor and Satire in short stories, and for reminding us about the TV tie-in with the Jeeves and Wooster series. I'm sure there will be many looking in on Jeeves in Springtime.  It sounds terrific.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on March 15, 2009, 11:04:19 PM
Sounds super Barbara, I will be there.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 16, 2009, 09:23:12 AM
PEDLN, how does one ride a bike to work in winter, in New York?  Your daughter must have been an Eskimo in a previous life.  Brrr!   ;)

I'll have to remember to check the index for 'Jeeves...' before I leave.  I enjoy Wodehouse, and found the TV series so much fun.  Can you believe that Bertie Wooster is now Dr. House?!!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: lucky on March 17, 2009, 07:58:26 PM

Sometimes movies are better than the book.  "Imitation Of Life", by Fannie Hurst is a case in point.  The book is a real hodgepodge, but the movie ( the one with Claudette Colbert, not the one with Lana Turner) was worth seeing.  Because of the movie I wanted to read the book and then was sorry that I did.  It tackles many thorny issues of the early part of the l9th century particularly "passing", hence the name "Imitation Of Life".   Blacks, of light skin color were often able to pass for white and the book does a good job of dealing with this  which was a serious issue in the black community.  Do any of you find that the movies that were made in the l930's and 1940's were so much better than those produced today.  I think they had much better writers in those days.  Today so much of movies is action, blood and gore and sex, sex, sex.  There doesn't seem to be the kind of good, solid writing that produced "The Life Of Emile Zola," "The Life Of Louis Pasteur", and "Madame Curie", "Random Harvest," and "Mrs. Minever."
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 17, 2009, 10:41:30 PM
Lucky: Yes, today it's hard to find movies written with a good strong storyline and which leave something to the imagination  ;) though occasionally there is one.  Can you tell me anything about the film Life of Zola which you mentioned. The others are familiar to me but not the Zola one. I'm a big fan of his and have a fair collection of his work and books about him as well...
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: lucky on March 18, 2009, 09:06:15 PM
Hi Gumtree

The film "The Life Of Emile Zola", starred Paul Muni and was produced sometime in the l930's.  The focal point of the drama is the Dreyfus case.  Zola was the only man in France who had the courage to accuse the French military of covering up a gross miscarriage of justice.  The piece that he wrote, "J'Accuse", is probably the best known essay of the l9th century.  In it he accused the French military of a gross miscarriage of justice.  Because he wrote the truth he was accused of defamation and was forced to flee France England.  Telling the truth is often a dangerous choice.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 18, 2009, 09:33:25 PM
Lucky Thanks for that information - the mention of Paul Muni brought the whole film back into mind though I couldn't for the life of me remember it before  :-[  Zola certainly had the courage to stand up and be counted. His untimely death under mysterious circumstances is always intriguing and there are lots of versions of that part of his story. His novels are really great - Cousin Bette, Money, The Drunkard, Doctor Pascal, etc but best of all Germinal.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on March 18, 2009, 10:39:30 PM
I have never read Zola. I take it I am missing something.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: BarbStAubrey on March 19, 2009, 03:10:41 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ds6hHdP3hFw
The movie trailer for Emile Zola
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 19, 2009, 11:21:50 AM
Barbara - you really are indefatigable in chasing up links - thanks for the Paul Muni one.

Muni was a man of a thousand faces and always looked different in each role he played. I remember many of his films...he and Edward G Robinson were related in some way - Muni came from the Ukraine and his real name was Meier Weisenfreund and was called Mooney (this amazing piece of trivia was contributed by my DH who holds such items in his mind   ::))

Frybabe I think that perhaps Zola is  an acquired taste - he wrote heaps so it is easy to read one of his lesser works and dismiss him but taken overall his oeuvre is quite something. So is his life's story with his involvement with the Dreyfus case and suspicious death.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: BarbStAubrey on March 19, 2009, 12:57:38 PM
Gumtree just a curiosity that won't quit - I remember as a small pre-schooler anytime I went anyplace with my father I could ask him the name of a building or a tree or whatever and he told me - I was annoyed and so dismissive of  my mother because when I asked her she didn't know - hehehe it may have been her way of getting me to walk along quietly since I was always filled with a million questions - but then when I saw my father next [his work often brought him home after I was asleep at night] I would describe what building or whatever it was that Mom could not answer so that he could tell me. To this day in my mind there is no such thing as a blank space - mention something new or something that is new to someone in conversation and my knee jerk compulsion rears its head to find and offer the information - All to quibble with the word indefatigable - compulsion is the adjective  ::)  :-[  ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: lucky on March 19, 2009, 04:32:22 PM
Hi Gumtree

I too read all of Zola.  Have you ever seen the French film "Gervaise", with Maria Schell?  It is a great film and a good adaptation of the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 20, 2009, 01:10:42 AM
Good Afternoon !

Lucky I don't recall seeing Gervaise either the version you mention or indeed any other - I should check out what's available on DVD. It took me a moment or two to remember which book was involved but then it came back to me - L'Assommoir often published in English as The Dram Shop or The Gin Palace even The Drunkard - such a tragic heroine - in parts so depressing and yet Zola manages to capture the reader's sympathy and compassion. The whole Rougon- Macquart series is fascinating especially taken overall but the individual stories hold up on their own - genius!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 20, 2009, 10:49:51 AM
Barbara
Whether it's indefatigable or compulsory I'm grateful for the results and appreciate your effort . After all,... what's in a name...that which we call the rose.....
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on March 29, 2009, 06:50:33 PM
This doesn't really qualify as a "movie" - but HBO begins a 7-part series tonight based on Alexander McCall Smith's "Ladies #1 Detective Agency" books.  I have read and enjoyed them all and am looking forward to seeing the scenes filmed in Botswana.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on March 29, 2009, 07:18:54 PM
This doesn't really qualify as a "movie" - but HBO begins a 7-part series tonight based on Alexander McCall Smith's "Ladies #1 Detective Agency" books.  I have read and enjoyed them all and am looking forward to seeing the scenes filmed in Botswana.
Certainly it's a movie.  It starts here at 8 pm, and almost makes me wish I had cable.  It got very good reviews in today's paper.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 29, 2009, 10:33:03 PM
I just watched a very good movie -- THE SWIMMER (1968) with Burt Lancaster, Janice Rule, Kim Hunter, and others.  It's from a story by John Cheever.  I've had his book of short stories on my TBR list.  The book received a 1979 Pulitzer award.  Really great acting in the movie.
Now I'll read Cheever's story.

I also want to see the 1990 film, THE COMFORT OF STRANGERS from the short early novel by Ian McEwan.  The film stars Christopher Walken and Helen Mirren.  I just finished the novel and was fascinated by it, altho' it is rather strange. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 30, 2009, 09:10:20 AM
Burt Lancaster was a very good actor; Janice Rule and Kim Hunter were good, too.  I don't remember a movie called "The Swimmer".  Did you notice whether Closed Captioning was available, MARJ?
  Helen Mirren and Christopher Walker are good, too.  Let me know what you think of "The Comfort of Strangers" when/if you see it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 30, 2009, 02:00:38 PM
Babi, I looked THE SWIMMER up on Internet Movie Database, and it says nothing about closed captioning.  Perhaps in 1968 when it was made they did not have that.

I had never heard of the movie either, until I read a column by Dick Cavett in the NY Times where he gave a link to one of his TV programs where he had interviewed John Cheever and John Updike together.  That's when I looked into Cheever's writings and found a film had been made of his short story.  (I really liked the old Dick Cavett programs -- much more interesting than most of the current late night shows -- he interviewed interesting people, not just blonde bimbo movie starlets--people like Jack and Robert Kennedy, Richard Nixon, authors, etc.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 30, 2009, 02:09:49 PM
Whoops -- It was Jack Parr's late night show that had the Kennedy brothers, and Nixon (who played the piano).  Wonderful show also -- loved it.  Best of the bunch along with Cavett, IMO!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on March 30, 2009, 11:19:37 PM
Ah, Jack Parr - the best of the best (or at least a tie with Johnny Carson). My Dad would let me stay up to watch it. Remember Malcolm Muggeridge? He was one of my favorite guests.

I also remember he let me stay up late to watch old movies. I particularly remember All's Quiet on the Western Front. It was one of Dad's favorites. If I am not mistaken Ernie Kovaks hosted the movie program.

Dick Cavet's show was way too short lived.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 31, 2009, 07:22:14 AM
Darn, Frybabe, I'm afraid I don't remember Malcolm Muggeridge on the Paar show.  I thought I remembered all of them.  I do remember Dody Goodman, Genevieve (she died not long ago), Oscar Levant, Cliff Arquette (Charlie Weaver), Peter Ustinov, etc.  Wonderful, all.

I also really liked the Steve Allen show.  So sad that the studio destroyed all the tapes of his programs.  I remember he made famous Don Knotts, Tom Poston, Louie Nye (as Gordon Hathaway..."Hi, ho, Steverino"), Bill Dana (My name... Jose Jimenez), Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme and so many others. 

Those were the shows where real conversation, and good comedy, were king.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 31, 2009, 08:31:00 AM
None of those old movies had closed captioning, MARJ, but many of them have closed captioning added now when they are put on DVD.  Not all of them, unfortunately, but I am glad for those that do.  There are so many great old movies I wouldn't mind seeing again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on March 31, 2009, 09:28:52 AM
Marjfay, I had to go aGoogling just in case I was remembering wrong. There are more postings on Google for Malcolm Muggeridge than I expected. I couldn't find more than two listings for him being on Jack Paar, one in Sept., 1963 and one in Oct. 1973. He also was interviewed by a very young Mike Wallace and was on William F. Buckley's Firing Line several times. He certainly was a character, a former socialist who discovered Christainity, has a bunch of movie and TV credits, was an editior for Punch magazine for a while, wrote a few books.

Here is a youtube clip from Firing Line.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__nHqyLfeFE&feature=related
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 02, 2009, 10:54:25 PM
Babi, The Swimmer is listed in Netflix as having both captions and subtitles.  But it's also listed as a "save" as opposed to an "add."  Apparently it is not yet out in DVD format.  You are correct when you say that many of the older films have had captions added.  Thank goodness, huh?

I really like Helen Mirren, but I'm not sure Comfort of Strangers is high on my list of priorities. Sounds really dark.

How did you like the first of the Alexander McCall Smith videos?  My book group met today and of the women was complaining about how much she liked the books and disliked the movie she just saw.  She seemed to feel they talked around in circles.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on April 03, 2009, 12:40:37 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movie2150.jpg)
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?

_______________________________

Books Into Movies Now on DVD (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2moviesDVD.asp)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Books in a Series by Their Authors (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/K_Authors/K_Authors.html)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)



CallieAs a program, I really liked the first "#1 Ladies"..." but I can understand how the woman who complained felt.  They took bits and pieces from several of the books, so, if you've read them all, it was a bit disjointed.
The photography is gorgeous (it was filmed in Botswana) and the actors are really good.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 03, 2009, 08:29:49 AM
I haven't seen any of the 'Ladies Detective AGency videos, PEDLN.  Actually,
I've only read the first of the books. It was okay, but It didn't really
interest me enough to read another.
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 03, 2009, 10:52:09 AM
Callie, does the #1 Ladies .  .  .  .  have a specific title?  I'd like to put it on my Netflix queue for whenever it DOES come out in DVD.   I tried to search on McCall Smith, but didn't really want to scan the 1100+ items brought up.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on April 03, 2009, 04:23:49 PM

My feelings exactly, Babi, but I would like to see the DVD.
JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on April 03, 2009, 05:05:06 PM
Looks like S&F is down again!  Hope to see a lotta postings here to make up for it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on April 03, 2009, 08:12:51 PM
Pedlin: Titles in the Series are:
1 "The #1 Ladies Detective Agency".
2. Tears of the Giraffe
3.  Morality For Beautiful Girls
4. The Kalahari Typing School For Men
5.  The Full Cupboard of Life
6.  In the Company of Cheerful Ladies
7.  Blue Shoes and Happiness
8.  The Good Husband of Zebra Drive
9.  The Miracle at Speedy Motors

All are set in a fictional town near the real Gabarone in Botswana.

Do you think the 7 episodes of the HBO series will be out on DVD before they've all been broadcast?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 11, 2009, 01:19:13 PM
Callie, thanks for listing those titles -- are they for the films as well as the books.  I would love to see the film, if for nothing other than the scenery.

It's been a little hectic around here, so yesterday, when the supermarket had Kashi Thin Crust pizzas on sale I bought one and settled in to just watch DVDs. (Ate the whole darn thing) while watching Nights in Rodanthe, with Richard Gere and Diane ? -- it's okay, but a tad slow-moving for me.  I didn't know it was from a book by the same title by Nicholas Sparks.  I've never really been a fan of his.

Will finish watching it tonight.  I don't usually finish movies in one night, so win I do, I know it's a winner.  This one is not.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on April 11, 2009, 01:50:41 PM
pedln, I, too, was disappointed by Nights in Rodanthe.  I paid for it from On Demand, because I generally like Richard Gere in romantic comedies.  But....
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 11, 2009, 03:15:35 PM
 Thanks for the critique on that movie, Pedln and Mary.  I was considering ordering it from Netflix, but now I won't bother.  I'm always glad to avoid
disappointment   ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on April 11, 2009, 04:36:03 PM
Just a suggestion, but a very good place to look at reviews of a movie is online at INTERNET MOVIE DATABASE.  I always do this before ordering a movie so I don't waste time with a bad or boring movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on April 11, 2009, 10:45:15 PM
pedln,  those titles aren't listed in my t v guide for the weekly episodes.  I don't think the episodes concentrate on one book's plot line.

I'm not a fan of Nicholas Sparks either - but I do like Richard Gere.  However, it seems that all his characters have been the same since "Chicago.  Maybe he's gotten lazy after all that dancing and singing.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 12, 2009, 10:07:01 AM
Maybe Gere felt dancing and singing aren't 'his thing'.  I'll always remember him best for "An Officer and a Gentleman".  That was a great movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on April 12, 2009, 03:32:07 PM
Babi, I agree about "An Officer and a Gentleman" and I suspect you're right about Gere and the dancing/singing.

This Friday night, HBO is showing all the "#1 Ladies Detective Agency" episodes, including tonight's, back-to-back.  They begin at 6:00 p.m. Central Daylight Time.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on April 13, 2009, 02:23:26 AM
Enjoying the conversation about the dancing Richard Gere - I rather thought he enjoyed dancing . apart from Chicago he also danced in Shall We Dance with Susan Sarandon and Jennifer Lopez. I think there are another couple of films where he dances too but can't think of the titles right now.

Dancing or not  - I like him!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 13, 2009, 09:39:54 AM
I have cable, CALLIE, but isn't HBO one of those 'premium' channels, where you must pay extra to view?  Val and I have more than enough to watch without buying extra channels, so we don't have any of the 'premium's. Which
means, of course, that sometimes I can't see some things I would like to.

   Me, too, GUM!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 13, 2009, 10:16:17 AM
I see that Netflix plans to get the Alexander McCall Smith film about Botswana -- at least it's in their database and you can "save" it -- which I've done.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on April 13, 2009, 10:26:27 AM
The AMcCS "film", "series", "whatever it's called" is well worth seeing - no matter what method you use.

I haven't tried Netflix (yet). I haven't broken it down, but I think the "price" of each HBO program I watch per month justifies paying the extra premium. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on April 13, 2009, 02:52:52 PM
I noticed that The World According to Garp was on TV last night. Something I hadn't realized before is that it was adapted from a John Irving book. Robin Williams played the lead as he did in Dead Poet's Society. Both of these movies were very good, but both were also disturbing enough for me not to want to watch them again. I can't quite place my finger on what bothers me. Maybe it is because of the tragic outcomes. I have seen movies before that did not have happy endings, but they didn't make me feel uncomfortable like these two did.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on April 13, 2009, 03:59:48 PM
Frybabe, do you think it might be more disturbing to see these kinds of stories acted out than to read them? 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 13, 2009, 09:09:32 PM
Callie, I'll not try to answer for Frybabe, but for me, reading Garp was also very disturbing. Irving is just plain weird at times, but also, the images he paints are sometimes hard to deal with.  I don't remember that much about Dead Poets Society, other than it took place at a boys' boarding school, supposedly in the Nashville, TN area.. The name eludes me right now.

Re: Netflix.  It's been a lifesaver for me as I have great difficulty hearing and understanding dialog in the theatres, and in my town we get a subtitled foreign film about once a millenium.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on April 13, 2009, 09:49:05 PM
Pedln, I don't know anything about Garp but I vaguely remember seeing Dead Poets Society.

I'm sure I will be interested in Netflix at some point.  I,too, have problems with dialog in many movies I see in the theater.  I've thought it might be because I use closed captioning so much when I'm watching t v.   (Probably not! <smile>)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on April 14, 2009, 01:32:17 AM
Frybabe: I found The Dead Poet's Society film very unsettling and would never watch it again - although maybe I should to see what it is about it that bothered me so much. I don't think it was the outcome as, in general, a tragic ending doesn't unsettle me - rather the opposite because there is generally some fundamental truth being explored by the tragedy - but Dead Poets - I think I'll still give it a miss if it crosses my path again...
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 14, 2009, 08:42:32 AM
FRYBABE got me to thinking with that post.  It seems to me that a tragic ending can be uplifting, if we can see a purpose in it and it leaves us with a
feeling of hope.  The tragic endings that leave one with a sense of hopelessness or futility, an ugliness that seems to leave stains on the spirit....these are the
ones that we would rather not have seen.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: BarbStAubrey on April 15, 2009, 11:38:05 AM
Our Humorous short story for the month starts today - come on over and join  us for our monthly 10 day discussion - and - the O'Henry story was made into a movie although I did not see it as a movie and only remember reading it in School laughing along with the rest of the class. - Here is the link to "The Ransom of Red Chief" http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=436.0
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on April 15, 2009, 12:51:56 PM
Babi, you may have hit the nail on the head.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on April 16, 2009, 01:56:52 AM
I just watched a fascinating 2006 film: FUR:AN IMAGINARY PORTRAIT OF DIANE ARBUS, with Nicole Kidman and Robert Downey, Jr.  It was not from a book, but the fictional portrayal of the life of Arbus, who "they" say was one of the most original and influential photographers of the 20th century.  And I believe she was when I looked at some of her photographs -- unusual to say the least.  The movie reminded me of Beauty and the Beast, and one reviewer said it was reminiscent of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, a good comparison I thought.  I want to see the film again.

One reviewer said something that I really agree with regarding the filming of books.  He said, "I don't look to cinema to find something that is readily available at my local library."  I've never understood why people get so upset if the movie doesn't follow the book exactly.  I read the book first and then am interested to see how the director has used his/her imagination to create something just as wonderful as the book altho' it may differ in many ways.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on April 19, 2009, 08:11:36 PM

Did any of you see the movie OR read the book NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN?  I did not, but the library has the DVD of it and I may go by and pick it up.  Of course I am a member of Netflix, and could get it there.
JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 19, 2009, 08:51:40 PM
Oh Joy, aren't senior mements frustrating.  I can't remember if I've seen No country for old men, or not. It was on my Netflix que and it's not there now, but no yellow stars showing either.  Maybe I checked it out from the library -- they have it.  I can picture Tommy Lee Jones, but am not sure if I'm picturing him there or in The Valley of Elah -- now that one I can recommend.  Very good.  I know at one time I was hesitant because everyone was talking about how violent it was.  Sorry not to be much more help.  I'd suggest getting it from your library, and have your netflix for backup.

Last night I watched Dashiel Hammet's Maltese Falcon, which I'm sure I'd seen before -- with Humphrey Bogart and Mary Astor.  I know this was a biggie in its day, but it just seemed to lack a bit of oomph.  Now African Queen I could watch every day of the week, but not the MF.  What's another good Bogie movie besides Casablanca?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on April 19, 2009, 09:05:53 PM
Now African Queen I could watch every day of the week.

Me too.  It seems to be hard to come by but my daughter gave me a copy, and I've watched it a number of times.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on April 19, 2009, 11:47:39 PM
I read the book, NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN, and also saw the movie, a Coen Brothers film.  Both were great.  I don't believe you'd forget the movie, Pedln.  Javier Bardem played the villian and you wouldn't forget him.  He received an Oscar for this.  Bardem also did another very good film, BEFORE NIGHT FALLS, about the Cuban writer and poet, Reynaldo Arenas. 
 
I think I'd recommend reading NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN before seeing the movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 20, 2009, 09:03:29 AM
I, too, read the book and saw the movie.  The movie was good; the book was even better. Nevertheless, much of the story was harsh and the ending was sad.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on April 20, 2009, 09:50:27 AM

Pedlin: I am VERY familiar with senior moments! They are becoming more and more frequent.
Since I have such a hard time remembering what movies I have or have not seen I have begun
to jot down the title and brief note of history after seeing it. :'(
Case in point---Valley of Elah--- I think I watched but have no clue. ;D
JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on April 25, 2009, 06:40:53 AM
Just catching up after a few weeks away from "fun" time on the computer:
regarding:    The World According to Garp  ... one of the most unpleasant books I've
ever read.   I came close to throwing it out, which I never, never do ... and finally
put it in the library return box, where I often put mysteries, etc, which I've finished.
                                    
Our good news is as of next weekend, we're getting free movies-on-demand from
Comcast because we signed up for "triple-play"  which is that we added telephone to
our existing service of Internet and cable TV.

What shall I watch first?   Comcast provides a library of hundreds of movies on demand, which one can watch anytime, can pause, can watch over 2 nights, etc.   This is particularly helpful because during baseball season ... Go Redsox ... my husband ties up the TV from about 8:30 on.   Now I can watch half-a-movie before that, and finish it another night.  I have such an old DVD player that I couldn't easily do that.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 25, 2009, 09:07:23 AM
Ties up the television during prime time for the entire baseball season?!  I hope you enjoy baseball, too, Mippy.  I'd have to go buy a second TV! 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on April 25, 2009, 08:50:58 PM
Mippy, I wish I had the Redsox to watch.  After forever without a ball team, Washington DC has finally got the Nationals, but I can't watch them because they're only on a sports network I don't get.  And they're even worse than the old Senators I watched when I was young--won 3 games out of 15 so far.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on April 25, 2009, 09:11:28 PM
Hey, come to think of it, the movie "Damn Yankees" is based on a book, "The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant" by Douglass Wallop.  It resonates strongly for a DC native, loyal to the Senators through thick and thin.  I watched the movie again a couple of years ago, and it holds up very well, although with some sexist assumptions.  Gwen Verdon is magnificent.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on April 27, 2009, 09:31:08 AM
Hi, PatH ... who knew ...  fellow RedSox fan!

We saw the wonderful stage play musical, Damn Yankees, about 4 years ago here on Cape Cod
at Monomoy Theater, where the actors are mostly college kids from somewhere in
Ohio ... cannot recall ... with sometimes a pro- for the lead.

We go to these plays almost every year, but that still leaves me with my ongoing
discussion of:  which movie do you love that I should watch on Comcast?  They
claim to have a library of 400 old movies, with new ones added every month;
we'll see in a few weeks when I return home from helping my daughter with
our 2-week old new grandson, Casey.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on April 27, 2009, 11:23:10 AM
Mippy, I don't know how old it is, or if it's on On Demand.  But, if you haven't seen it (or not recently), be sure to watch "Second Hand Lion"  with Michael Caine, Robert Duvall, and Haley Joel Osment.  Magnificent!!!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on April 27, 2009, 04:23:51 PM
Thanks, Maryz, it sounds like a terrific choice!     :D

If I were to suggest just one movie, in the books-into-movie category, I'd go for
Captain Corelli's Mandolin (2001).    Did anyone else here like it?  It's good enough
to see again.

Of course all the period movies a la Withering Heights, etc are fun, but I've seen
most of that genre more than once.

Pedln/Ann   ~  too busy with Latin to make a suggestion here?    (She and I
have been swamped with work during this final week of class with dear Ginny.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 27, 2009, 06:15:56 PM
Second-Hand Lion and Corelli's Mandolin both -- wonderful.

The other night I watch Slumdog Millionaire, which is from a book or short story.  Difficult to watch in many parts, but the way the story unfolded was fascinating.  I didn't like it at first -- it took a little getting into, but I haven't returned it yet to Netflix, and may watch the beginning again.  But once I got into it, excellent.  Did any of you read R. Mistry's  A Fine Balance when we discussed it a few years ago?  That kept coming to mind often, during this film.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on April 27, 2009, 06:21:10 PM
(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/bookclubs/books2movies/books_movies2.gif)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/bookclubs/books2movies/film.gif)
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?
(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/bookclubs/books2movies/popcorn.jpg)
Books Into Movies Now on DVD (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2moviesDVD.asp)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Books in a Series by Their Authors (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/K_Authors/K_Authors.html)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)








Yes, Mippy, I liked Captain Corelli's Mandolin also. And when someone here or on SeniorsandFriends said the book was even better, I bought it. It is now residing on my TBR pile. I decided to read A Handmaid's Tail first.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 28, 2009, 09:16:41 AM
PEDLIN, I saw Slumdog Millionaire, and it wasn't at all what I expected. I agree, a bit slow getting into it, and harsh, but a really good movie.

  I didn't see "Captain Morelli's Mandolin", partly because I'm not really a big fan of Nicholas Gage (I know! Heresy!), and partly because I was so bored by a film that I think was called "The Red Violin".  I suspect the similarity in titles put me off.  More of a subconscious reaction than a logical one, of course.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on April 28, 2009, 11:23:31 AM
Hi, Babi!   I didn't like Red Violin, either.   But the Corelli movie has nothing whatsoever
to do with it.   

Has anyone seen the Marley movie?   Not only did I read the book by John Grogan,
but I bought it as a gift for a couple of people.  If you love dogs ...    yada   yada ...       :D  
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 28, 2009, 08:34:44 PM
Babi and Mippy, I guess you have to be a violinist to appreciate The Red Violin.  I haven't seen it yet (it's on my Netflix list), but my granddaughter (now a college freshman) has raved about it. She's studied violin for about 11 or 12 years now, and this year for a Music and Film Seminar at college, wrote a major paper (about 20 pages) about The Red Violin.  I've asked her to email me a copy of it, but haven't received it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on April 29, 2009, 06:42:02 AM
Ann/Pedln ~  Good morning!   Yes, there is terrific violin music in the Red Violin film,
played on the sound track by Joshua Bell,  but as I recall (watched it many years ago) the plot was not terrific.   But each to his own ...

I'm still hoping to get a few more ideas of what to watch on Comcast's movies-on-demand, when I get back in a couple of weeks.   

Hope everyone has a nice sunny spring week ahead!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 29, 2009, 09:59:45 AM
  You could hardly say a plot existed in that move, MIPPY.  I guess you did have
to be a musician, like PEDLN's granddaughter, and enjoy the beauty of the violin and the music so much you didn't care about the rest.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on May 04, 2009, 01:06:13 PM
I am not a violinist, but I absolutely loved "The Red Violin".   There should have been enough plot for anyone, following the history of this one instrument through the centuries. 

The movie of Corelli's Mandolin was severely panned, and made note of the fact that it didn't follow the book that closely.  (Which movies ever do, really?)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on May 04, 2009, 02:47:24 PM
Quote
The movie of Corelli's Mandolin was severely panned, and made note of the fact that it didn't follow the book that closely.  (Which movies ever do, really?)

Tomereader, how right you are. Most don't. I did see one long ago that stayed very close to the book (only one deviation that I saw) and that was Lawrence of Arabia.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanP on May 10, 2009, 09:24:27 PM
I came in this evening to ask if any of you are watching Maspterpiece Mystery  this evening  on PBS.  Tonight is the first of three episodes of " Wallander:Sidetracked" with the Irish actor, Kenneth Branagh.

These episodes are based on best selling books by Henning Mankell -
Sidetracked, Firewall and One Step Behind Are you interested in a discussion of these thrilling mysteies? 
SeniorLearn has been contacted by Masterpiece HGTV - offering us free sets of two lf these books if we are interested.  (Masterpiece is one of our Reading Promotion Partners in the Library of Congress Center for the Book.)

If you are intersted in these books and chatting about the PBS adaptations, please post here and we'll open a discussion - and send you your set of novels.
I'm watching the first episode right now - Kenneth Branagh is Detective Wallender!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 11, 2009, 09:03:50 AM
 Drat, I didn't even check to see what was on Masterpiece Theater last night.
I don't know if it aired here or not, but I certainly would have liked to see that if so.  We had company - my kids and grandkids (first time I've seen them in years; they live in Canada), but I could have taped the show if I had known.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on May 11, 2009, 09:11:58 AM
JoanP ~ Hi, dear friend!
 ... oooops ... missed Masterpiece last night, but it might be re-played, I hope.
Yes, I think I'm interested, love Kenneth, former husband of Emma,
but may not have time to do anything in a reading group before June.   
Do tell more about the "window" in which a group might discuss these. 
   If you need a snail mail address for me, please email.
Thanks much!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 11, 2009, 04:20:42 PM
Our PBS station is still out -- a good portion of southern Illinois lost power on Friday, including SIUniversity at Carbondale, where our PBS (even for  SE Missourians) originates.  I hope they rebroadcast, but they've got to get running first.  MarjV talked about the Henning Mankell books over in RATW, and they sounded good.  I've never read any, but would like to see the shows if they'r available.

A book/film I'd like to read/see is THe Boy in the Striped Pajamas.  It's coming up on my Netflix queue, but I can't find that it has captions or English subtitles.  Only Spanish is indicated.  Have any of you seen it?  Some of the reviews on Amazon pointed out aspects that would be well worth looking for.

Mippy, have you been finding good shows to watch with your new Comcast set-up?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanP on May 11, 2009, 06:53:09 PM
OK, we've opened a General  PBS Masterpiece Discussion   (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=502.0) to determine if there is interest in the Wallanders - 
This is the question in the header of the new discussion.

Would you like to form a Wallander Book/Film club?   We could discuss  the PBS adaptation of Henrick Mankell's novels  and/or discuss  Mankell's  novels  if you are interested.  We can send you a set of two of the Wallander novels for the price of postage - if supplies last.  Are you interested?

Since I had posted in several discussions about the series yesterday, I'm going to ask those of you  who expressed interest to go into the new discussion, so all the information is in one place.
I'll be looking for you there, ready to take your orders!  ;)  Thanks!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 12, 2009, 09:02:30 AM
  Well, I don't know about a Wallender club.  After we finished the books, what would the club do?  Maybe a PBS Masterpiece club would be more useful. I checked with my library and fortunately it does have the first two books, so I would not need one of the free sets to participate in
a discussion.
  I checked and found that the PBS presentation was repeated at 2 a.m. this
morning, so it is now on tape. I'll be watching it at the first opportunity and get back to you.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on May 12, 2009, 10:55:43 AM
Mark.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on May 12, 2009, 12:05:08 PM
Thanks for asking, Ann /Pedln,  but baby-helper duty has taken over my life.
It's absolutely wonderful helping with our new grandson, now a big 5-week old!
However, I was only home for 48 hours then returned to my daughter's house.
   
We watched the movie Marley (did I mention that last week?) and it wasn't as good as the book,
but the dog film parts were worth it to us, as we love big dogs.   If anyone loves dogs, they ought to enjoy the film.    Of course if you've read the book  you know the (sad) ending.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on May 20, 2009, 12:24:32 PM
Went to see ANGELS AND DEMONS last night, but left after the first hour.  The beginning of the film was interesting where you are shown the Vatican and the Vatican's archives.  But after that it became pretty predictable and boring.   Too bad, because I liked the book (IMO, better than his DaVinci Code.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on May 20, 2009, 12:40:02 PM
Marjifay, in the movie did they tone down the constant beatings, etc. that Langdon received in the book? I read the book but thought, how could this guy survive and keep going with all that violence upon his person. A bit over the top, I think. Having said that, the movie trailers didn't impress me as being an interesting movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on May 20, 2009, 01:12:14 PM
Frybabe, up to the time when we walked out, Langdon hadn't gotten any beatings.  Odd, it's been so long since I read Angels and Demons,
I don't recall him getting beaten.  I just remember I was fascinated by the voting process for a new pope, and the description of the Vatican archives.  Yes the book was pretty much "over the top," especially in the ending as I recall.  I've checked it out of the library to reread.  I shouldn't bother because I've got so many better books on my TBR list. 

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 20, 2009, 09:33:15 PM
Oh dear me, Marjifay.  My brother was just saying recently that he'd never seen a bad Tom Hanks movie, and  now you may be proving him wrong.  I haven't read the book and probably won't see the movie until it comes out on DVD, but "boring and predictable" don't sound very promising.

That's pretty much the way I felt while watching "W" this week.  Well, "boring and lopsided," she says liberally. Gave up and sent it back to Netflix before it was done.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 21, 2009, 08:37:49 AM
FRYBABE, I am often 'put-off' by the way films show their heroes receiving beatings that should put them in the hospital, yet they just drag themselves up and continue with their heroics.  I find myself considerably cheered when I find one where the guy is human and actually winds up in the hospital.
  Tom Hanks is certainly a fine actor, PEDLN, but even find actors can find themselves handicapped if the screenwriting is poor. I have seen that happen more than once.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 28, 2009, 11:23:55 AM
I think fine acting is what saved the film Doubt.  I watched it the other night.  It's based on a play written by John Shanley, who also wrote the screenplay and directed it.  Meryl Streep was fantastic, especially when all you really see of her is her face and hands, as everything else is enclosed in her habit.  Phillip Seymour Hoffman, who plays the priest she accuses of improprieties, and Amy Adams, the young idealistic nun, are also excellent.  But I only gave it three  (out of 5) Netflix stars.  It was okay, but just didn't quite come up to snuff for me.  There was much to consider in this film, and it does bear watching, but something is lacking.  I don't know what.  Without the outstanding acting it would have fallen flat.

I'm sure there are many opinions about this film.  What are yours?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on May 28, 2009, 12:01:14 PM
I have DOUBT, the play, on my TBR list.  Per reviews I've read, people who read the book/play were disappointed in the film.  But I love Meryl Streep and didn't realize that Phillip Seymour Hoffman was in it, so with your recommendation, I'll watch it.

Speaking of Phillip Seymour Hoffman, I watched the movie CHARLIE WILSON'S WAR last night on HBO and loved it.  Now I'll have to read the book by George Crile.  In case I'm not the only one who's just now seen it, it's about a charmng, womanizing, boozing U.S. Congressman from Texas (played by Tom Hanks) who is a hero when his efforts to assist the Afghanistanis in their war against the Soviet Union are a huge success.  How he does this is fascinating.  Both Hanks and  Hoffman were excellent.

As to 'W', I've never cared much for Oliver Stone's films and tend to ignore them.  So I'll also skip this one on your recommendation, even tho' W was not one of my favorite presidents, to say the least.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on June 03, 2009, 10:25:40 PM
I just finished reading REVOLUTIONARY ROAD by Richard Yates.  Interesting, but rather sad.  Now I want to see the movie, which my library has on DVD.  Has anyone read the book or seen the movie?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 04, 2009, 05:16:29 PM
Marjifay, I have done neither -- seen or read, but it is on my Netflix que.  Since I'm currently involved in other books, I'll probably see before I read, just like with the Wallendar series.  But that doesn't bother me, as the books are usually better anyway.

Last night I watched The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, from the book by John Boyne.  I liked the movie, not the subject, and doubt I will read the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on June 04, 2009, 09:31:27 PM
Pedln, I'd not heard of the film (or the book) of THE BOY WITH THE STIPED PAJAMAS.  I'll get the film.  But probably will wait a bit, because the book REVOLUTIONARY ROAD, altho' completely different subject,  kind of put me "thru the wringer."   Need something a little more calming next.  I have THE GREAT GATSBY on my movie que next -- an older and not a great movie, but I want to see what they did with the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on June 05, 2009, 10:12:58 PM
A conversation with JoanK this evening reminded me of "The Third Man".  This was originally a novella by Graham Greene, appearing in 2 installments in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine; I read it there, and saw the movie when it came out.  A year or so ago, I both reread the novella and watched the movie (Netflix has it).  Both still seem good, and especially, the movie is still definitely worth watching.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 05, 2009, 11:23:13 PM
PatH, when I joined Netflix 4 or 5 years ago, the first film I requested was The Third Man, can still here that theme song in my ears.  After reading your post I started looking for the book, but none of the libraries around here have it.  And from what I read online, it was never really written to be a book, but was supposed to have been a screenplay.  And many say the film is much better.  Guess it's time to watch it again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 06, 2009, 09:16:03 AM
 I saw "The Third Man" so long ago, all I remember is a shadowy figure that must have made a deep impression on me at the time.  I don't think I really understood all that was happening.  I wonder if the Netflix copy has closed captioning?  I would like to see it again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 06, 2009, 10:58:53 AM
Babi, everything I get from Netflix has captions or subtitles.  Yes, Third Man.  I agree with you about the shadowy figure.  Lots of fog?  Did they go in the sewers?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on June 06, 2009, 05:35:16 PM
Fog, sewers, a Ferris wheel, all sorts of good stuff.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 07, 2009, 09:24:39 AM
 Most do, PEDLN, but we've gotten a couple that did not.  Most disappointing.
Still, I think I'll put 'The Third Man' on the queue and see how it goes.  I would like to see if I can resolve the puzzlement from my previous viewing, now that I am older and more experienced.   8)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 12, 2009, 10:33:02 AM
Here’s a link to a review of The Taking of Pelham 123, and I don’t think there’s a spoiler there.  I never read the book and I never saw the earlier (1974?) movie, but this apparently is an updated, modern technology version.  James Gandolfini as the mayor of New York – that’s a switch.  And I love this – in the earlier film, Walter Mattau played a character named Zachary G – now in this film, Denzel Washington plays the same character, but they’ve given him the name of Walter G.  Ooh, I do love directors with a sense of  .   .    .   ..

The Taking of Pelham 123 (http://movies.nytimes.com/2009/06/12/movies/12pelham.html?8dpc)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 12, 2009, 10:50:24 AM
I read the Taking of Pelham 1-2-3 when it was published.  I saw the original movie.  Don't know why Hollywood thinks they have to re-make movies (to add in special effects, crashes and explosions; bad language)?  Oh, I love Denzel, but the logic of this remake escapes me!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 12, 2009, 11:22:03 AM
Well, Tomereader, PBS does it all the time -- note their updates on Agatha Christies -- past and upcoming.

It's been 35 years since Pelham, and most likely a director's or screenwriter's dream to see how the scenario fits in a post Guiliani, post 9/11 world.  And they're got a brand new audience that probably doesn't even know the earlier version exists -- and wouldn't relate to it if they did.

But, some things are sacred.  Just don't let them update  ---

Casablanca
African Queen
Sound of Music

and -- what else, what are your 'untouchables."
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 12, 2009, 12:00:26 PM
Pedln, your three of course, and GWTW!  The King and I.   I'm sure there are others, but I can't think of them at this moment.  Mebbe later.

Oh, and the one with Deborah Kerr and Burt Lancaster!  (I feel sure they have already remade it, but anything couldn't compare to one scene (kissin' on the beach!) Wow!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on June 12, 2009, 12:15:09 PM
Tomereader : The Kerr/Lancaster was From Here to Eternity - and weren't they both in Elmer Gantry - another untouchable.

Though it's far too soon to remake it  - Evita - with Madonna and Jonathon Price - I saw it six times at the movies and have the DVD .
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 12, 2009, 12:17:44 PM
It was Jean Simmons in Elmer Gantry!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on June 12, 2009, 01:13:54 PM
But the Brynner/Kerr "King" was an update from the original with Irene Dunne. And the musical has been remade, with Jody Foster (?) as Anna.

And I do love the African Queen.  But I heard somewhere that Sean Connery had bought the property.  And, IMHO, he is more than welcome to do a remake - as long as he plays Charlie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on June 12, 2009, 01:38:28 PM
I loved the African Queen with Humphrey Bogart.

As for Sean Connery, he was the best of the James Bonds, but IMO he hasn't made a good film since.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 12, 2009, 04:26:32 PM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movie2150.jpg)
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?

_______________________________

Books Into Movies Now on DVD (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2moviesDVD.asp)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Books in a Series by Their Authors (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/K_Authors/K_Authors.html)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)






marjifay, did you see "Finding Forrester"?  That was a good film.  And I liked his action ones: The Rock and the one with J. LOpez.

maryz, the movie with Jodie Foster was a remake, but no musical!  I loved that one too. I may not have been around for the IRene Dunne one. (just probably haven't seen it)

My made up saying is:  "There is no Bond but Bond, and  Connery is his name".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on June 12, 2009, 04:29:36 PM
I don't see how anyone could equal the original "African Queen"  We don't have a Katherine Hepburn.

And I'd add "The Wizard of Oz".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 12, 2009, 04:33:10 PM
Oh, yeahhhh, the Wizard of Oz!  How could I forget that one?

And a big, loud NO on anyone doing the African Queen, don't care who might play "Charlie".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on June 12, 2009, 05:23:23 PM
Oh, I most definitely do not want to see a remake of GWTW.  Rhett Butler is Clark Gable is Rhett Butler - and there is NO - NOT ONE - current "Hunk" that can duplicate that role!

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 12, 2009, 05:51:58 PM
 The only logic required to do a remake is: "Will the public come to see it?"
And obviously, we do.  Look how many times Jane Austen and Agatha Christie have been re-done, yet I wouldn't miss a one!
  Some themes have been overdone for me.  I'm really tired of stories about
half-baked stories about King Arthur.  :(
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on June 12, 2009, 09:39:30 PM
Never thought I'd say this but Daniel Crain, IMHO, is the best Bond.  Connery's Bond belongs the the age of Doris Day and Rock Hudson love stories (remember when?) but DC is a sexier, more dangerous, more intelligent but more visceral Bond.  Two different animals.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on June 12, 2009, 10:35:14 PM
No, Tomereader, I haven't seen Finding Forrester.  I'll look for it.

And I take back what I said, because I did like the film The Name of the Rose which Connery made after the all the James Bond films.
(I agree with your saying about Connery & Bond!)

A remake of a film I want to see is The Taking of Pelham 1-2-3, because it has James Gandofini from the Sopranos, and John Turturro in smaller parts.  I'll probably be sorry because I really liked the original film with Walter Matthau, and haven't cared much for any Denzel Washington films I've seen.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 13, 2009, 10:34:45 AM
Really, Marjifay?   I don't think I've seen a Denzel Washington film I didn't like,
though I admit I don't want to see the one about the big time gangster. I find
him to be an excellent actor.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on June 13, 2009, 11:17:54 AM
Well, Babi, that's what makes life interesting, isn't it?  Not everyone agrees about a lot of things.  I'm sure a lot of people agree with you re Denzel Washington's films.
Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 13, 2009, 11:17:56 AM
marjifay, I agree about "The Name of the Rose", but I had read the book, and it rather skewed my impression of the movie, even though my Sean was in it!! Ha Ha!  He did a great job, and fit the part well.  Think his "tonsure" was real??  LOL.  When I saw my first Bond movie (1966, was it) (I had been reading the books from the time they were published here), and Sean popped up out of the water in those swim trunks...well let's just say I was in love!  Should have still been sighing over Elvis, but this was a M-A-N, and oh so sexy! (Daniel Craig looks pretty great in swim trunks too, even to an old woman like me!)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on June 13, 2009, 11:24:50 AM
My estimation of Sean Connery and George C. Scott went way up years and years ago when I read that they are/were readers (and not just for movie character research).

Finding Forrester is something of a little known GEM in my opinion. The Hunt for Red October is one of my personal favorites. And don't forget The Man Who Would Be King, Medicine Man, and The Wind and the Lion none of which I have seen in a long time.

I remember Scott best for Patton, of course, and Dr. Stangelove.... Didn't he also play in a version of Beauty and the Beast or am I remembering wrong?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 13, 2009, 11:33:29 AM
To All:  And as we talk about movies, it just dawned on me...see if you find it so...remembering older movies, and the studios' "star system", isn't it amazing that you seem to remember the stars of those films, but the supporting actors kind of fade into the background.  Whereas these days, most of the supporting actors seem to hold a second-level star quality, and now those actors/actresses are coming to star in their own films.  I know I'm not wording this the way I want to, but hopefully you all will understand what I'm getting at!  Think Phillip Seymour Hoffman, Thomas Haden Church, Malkovich, etc.   Even in secondary roles these actors stand out, and finally are being recognized for it.  I appreciate them as they have labored long and hard for recognition. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 13, 2009, 11:40:33 AM
I agree, frybabe, about Finding Forrester being a GEM, and how could I have overlooked all the movies you mentioned, I loved every one of them, Red October specially.  Wow, are we having a great discussion, or what?  LOL
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on June 13, 2009, 12:19:54 PM
Tomereader:  Good point.  Appreciation of directors has become a selling point, too.  In the studio days the studio was the producer and set the tone of the product.  Nowadays a package is set up, director, story, actors, etc, and then sold as a whole.  Seems like a better integration of talents, personalities, etc.  Of course the money men still have the last say, as always.  Profit is the bottom line.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on June 13, 2009, 12:49:14 PM
Am loving the discussion.  Interesting, all the different opinions.

Tomereader, I've never seen Thomas Haden Church that I know of.  One of the sexier hunks IMO in secondary roles is Willlem Dafoe.

And some of my favorite movies have been those written/directed/acted by (dare I say it?) -- Woody Allen.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 13, 2009, 12:52:03 PM
Babi, I’m with you on Denzel Washington.  I like him.

Tomereader and Jackie,  good points about the supporting actors and the packaging of the film as a whole.  And, I won’t try to name names, but more actors are also directing, with many good results.

Marjifay, I had to search Netflix for Thomas Haden Church because I didn't know if I'd seen him or not -- he was in Sideways.  It takes me a while to learn names and faces of some of the more recent actors. Laura Linney is one I really like -- in Jindabyne and loved her in John Adams.   (Must confess I've never seen a James Bond movie -- saw Connery in Hunt for Red Oct. & Murder on the Orient Express.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on June 13, 2009, 01:16:57 PM
We first saw Thomas Haden Church in the sitcom, Wings, as the not-too-bright mechanic.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on June 13, 2009, 01:34:27 PM
Marjifay: I agree  about Willem Dafoe as a great actor - hadn't really thought of him before as a sex symbol but can definitely see what you mean  :D
I remember him best as Caravaggio in The English Patient and as T.S. Eliot in Tom and Viv but have seen him in a host of other films as well.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on June 13, 2009, 08:19:33 PM
Wings!  I loved Wings.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on June 13, 2009, 10:16:50 PM
Oh, now I know who Church is -- I also loved Wings, one of the few sitcoms I watched besides Sieinfeld.  Church was great as the mechanic.  I'll have to get Sideways.  Thanks, Tomereader.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 14, 2009, 08:28:49 AM
PEDLN, I'm amazed. I don't know how one could have avoided seeing a James Bond movie. They are so popular it's like saying one never saw a Walt Disney movie or read Harry Potter!  You must have made a conscious effort to avoid them.  ;)

  I had to go look up 'Finding Forrester', but now I remembet it and I agree..it
was wonderful.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on June 14, 2009, 08:48:03 AM
Some of us are just slower, Babi.  ::)  The only Bond movies we've seen are those with Sean Connery. 

And I didn't read any of the Harry Potter books until after I'd seen the first movie.  Having said that, I've now read all the books, but have seen only 2-3 of the movies.

Obviously, we don't go to many movies.  I'd go frequently or watch at home, but John's never been a movie-goer.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on June 14, 2009, 02:27:57 PM
Babi,  I never read Harry Potter, or seen the movies, nor do I intend to
(LOL)

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 15, 2009, 08:31:04 AM
I watch all my movies at home, MaryZ.  On Demand TV or Netflix...it's all about
closed captioning now for me.

  Whatever makes you happy, Marj; some probably consider Harry Potter too juvenile.  Val and I found them highly entertaining.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 15, 2009, 08:39:58 AM
Well, I read the first Harry Potter years ago, but you all know so story -- so much to read, so little time.  And I used to watch the movies with my grandkids when I'd go to visit.  You've given me an idea, Babi.  Now that they're all in high school or college, I think I'll ask on the next visit if I can take them home for a Harry Potter Marathon.  I think they've got them all.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 16, 2009, 08:08:48 AM
Sounds like fun, PEDLN.  Don't forget the popcorn!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 16, 2009, 09:57:39 AM
Golly, there sure seems to be a lot to talk about in Books and Movies these days.  Werem’t we just talking about The Third Man?  And here’s the NYTimes with an article about Graham Greene’s films,  saying that he was “entirely comfortable with the movies.”

The Screen’s Seduction of Graham Greene (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/14/movies/14raff.html?hpw)

And Tomereader  was talking about the talented supporting actors who have now come into their own.  I just finished watching the 2001 production IRIS, about Iris Murdoch’s decline into Alzheimers.  Kate Winslet had been nominated for BSActress with that one (and Judi Dench a Best Actress nomination.)  Jim Broadbent won a Best Supporting Actory for his role as the aging John Bayley.  I’m not familiar with him.  What else might he have played in.  The young John Bayley was played by Hugh Bonneville, and the name is familiar, but I don’t know what films.

(And, I must confess again, I don’t think I’ve ever read an Iris Murdoch novel.  But that will change.)  Which should be the first?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on June 16, 2009, 11:00:14 AM
pedln:  Internet Movie DataBase (IMDB) has a very nice searchable database.  To see what movies Jim Broadbent was in see here:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000980/
This is one of my main sources, along with Fantastic Fiction and Wikipedia.  It's fun while watching a movie to look at IMDB and learn about the location(s), anachronisms, etc.  Sometimes I get an urge to see, say, all the movies Christopher Guest made so I look him up and then start ordering the novies from Netflix, another of my primary sources. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on June 16, 2009, 11:03:56 AM
Pedln, I'm a rabid Harry Potter fan--I even stood in line at midnight for the last 3 books, along with the tired little kids and the excited teenagers.  Do tell us how your marathon goes, and whether you get indigestion reading them close together.  And if you don't already know it, don't let anyone tell you how the series ends.  Of course a fanatic can pick holes in the movies, but they're very good.  It fries me that the next one has been finished for some time and is being held back for reasons of commercial timing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 16, 2009, 11:04:32 AM
I think, but am not sure, that Jim Broadbent was in "In The Bedroom" with Sissy Spacek, and may have had a nomination for that role.  Again, I THINK.  I'm almost never SURE!  lol
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 16, 2009, 11:12:56 AM
No, correcting myself, In the Bedroom was Tom Wilkinson.  Another actor in supporting roles who is star quality!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 16, 2009, 07:43:41 PM
Jackie, thanks for the link.  I see Broadbent is in Vanity Fair -- which is on my shelf, still unseen, even tho I picked it up on sale about two years ago.

PatH, you were probably in line with my grandkids.  I don't plan to read the Potters right now, but would like to see all the films in order.  But have too many other books to read right now, what with the PBS  Agatha Christie series coming up -- just picked up two from the library today.  And also a couple Henning Mankells, but not the three Wallendars shown recently on PBS.  My two Seattle grandkids have a very kind next door neighbor, a retired gentleman.  When the last book came out he knew that they had only one copy between them and that one of the kids wanted to read it at sleep away camp.  He lent them his copy, before he even had a chance to read it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 17, 2009, 09:06:21 AM
 You'll have to form you own opinion, PEDLN, but I found the movie "Iris" to be most unpleasant and depressing. Then, reading one of her books, I found I didn't like that either.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on June 17, 2009, 10:46:57 AM
I found the film Iris to be very moving and brilliantly acted. Of course the subject matter - a brilliant woman suffering with Alzheimer's Disease  - was harrowing and unpleasant. I've read several of her books and find I sometimes have to work at the philosophy they embody but they are worth it in the end. She won many literary prizes for her work. One of my plans is to read all the fiction she wrote in the order she wrote them - but not this week  :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanP on July 05, 2009, 01:30:30 PM
You might want to look in on  tonight's episode on PBS Masterpiece - A number of us are enjoying the comparison between Agathie Christie'  novels and the film adaptations. 

We're all looking forward to the new Miss Marple in  Agatha Christie's Pocketful of Rye.-  an all new production with a new Miss Marple.  Here is an interview with Julia McKenzie, talking of her role as Miss Marple -  If you are hard of hearing, you will probably have some trouble hearing it - her voice is quite soft - If you can turn up your audio, you will probably have to do so.

Interview with Julia McKenzie - Miss Marple (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/marple/mckenzie.html)

Join the discussion here  in
PBS MASTERPIECE   (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=617.120) 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 07, 2009, 02:16:57 PM
I've got 'em set to record, Joan and am hoping there are no momentary power outages while I'm away from home.  It'll be fun to compare Pocketful with the book, and I look forward to seeing a new Miss Marple.

Has anyone seen Jodi Picoult's MMy Sister's Keeper, which has just recently come out?  What did you think of it?  I havben't seen it yet.

Or, The Stoning of Soroya M I'm not sure of the details, but I think it's based on a journalist's porttrayal.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on July 08, 2009, 08:21:07 AM
 I haven't seen the movie, JOAN, but I did see an article the other day that the
family is greatly upset because the filmmakers changed the ending. Whatever that was. 
  Do you see a similarity between film writers and reporters.  If you can't get a good quote...make one up?  Whatever will sell.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 08, 2009, 05:46:25 PM
Babi, are you saying tne Christie family was upset about the changes?  That's surprising, because there have been so many changes and adaptations over the years.  Look at what they did to the ones with Geraldine McEwan.

has anyone seen UP, an animated film by Pixar?  I wasn't planning to, but after reading an article in the Seattle Times.  There was an elderly (86 years) woman living in Ballard, what used to be the Scandinavian area of Seattle.  All she wanted to do was live her life in her little house. And so, when the developers came she turned down their offers of $1 million, and stayed in her house while on three sides of her were built 5 story buildings. It became the Little House that Could. She had a good friend who did kind things for her and when she died her will bequeathed the house to him.  Now the house has been sold to a man who has a motivational speaking business and he is going to raise the house up to the level of its surrounding buildings and will have his offices there with public access in the floors below.

In UP, the article stated, an old man tied balloons to his house, to keep it from the developers, and then floated away to adventures in other lands.  Sounds like fun.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on July 09, 2009, 08:22:48 AM
 Oh, no, Pedln.  I'm referring to the one you mentioned:
Quote
Has anyone seen Jodi Picoult's My Sister's Keeper, which has just recently come out?  What did you think of it?  I havben't seen it yet.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanP on July 15, 2009, 08:54:31 AM
Babi, Pedln - have you read the book?  I've got about 100 pages left - cannot put it down.  I'm told that those who didn't care for the way the book ended will like the movie ending better.  Can't comment because I haven't finished the book yet.  Must say, I can't put the thing down.  

BUT - I do have to take care of business - and came in with this announcement this morning - Several months ago we had a vote for Individual Book Discussion Titles - and you all voted for Dickens'  Mystery of Edwin Drood, which we hope to discuss in September - and Geraldine Brooks'  People of the Book, which starts - TODAY!
Hope you didn't forget - we're waiting to hear what you think of Brooks'  protagonist - Hanna Heath.  If you haven't started the book yet, that's okay too.  The author is travelling abroad on an international book tour this month, but promises to try to respond to your questions via email if she can.  Please do come  over and say hello -  

  People of the Book (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=680.0).




Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 17, 2009, 10:12:34 PM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movie2150.jpg)
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?

_______________________________

Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Sources for Films from Books (http://www.library.sjsu.edu/research/web/iguide_subjectList.htm?t=41&catID=1044)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Books in a Series by Their Authors (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/K_Authors/K_Authors.html)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 17, 2009, 10:13:07 PM
Here's an example where the movie is better than the book.  I just read C. S. Forester's "The African Queen", the basis for that wonderful movie with Humphrey Bogart and Katherine Hepburn.  The movie and the book are pretty much alike most of the way, but the ending of the book is quite different, and less satisfactory.

An amusing difference is that the movie has bumped up the social class of the characters.  In the movie, Rosie and her brother are Establishment, (probably bottom level) and Allnut is Canadian, hence hard to place, though he is obviously working class.  In the book, Rosie is the daughter of a shopkeeper, and Allnut is a Cockney, only one level down from Rosie.

Who knows how the marriages worked out in either case.  In the movie, they are left floating down the lake on a piece of wreckage, no clue as to what happens next.

The book is a good read, though, with lots of details about navigating the river and patching up the African Queen.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 23, 2009, 12:10:13 PM
PatH, you've just sent me looking at AMazon for African Queen DVDs.  I think I'd like to own this classic, and that's definitely what it is.  That looks like it might be a little tricky, as I don't want used, and I need captions or subtitles, but in English, please.

There was a bit of discussion among the reviewers about the imports, the Chinese subtitles, the region numbers, etc.  And some discontent that US film makers haven't done anything about reproducing or remastering or whatever this classic, but have left it to non-US markets.

Guess I'll wait until I can hold it in my hand at the store.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 25, 2009, 10:53:53 AM
Browsing in the online New York Times can lead to many places, and to another site for Books Into Movies, on slow Saturday morning.  This one turned up as I was checking out the review of a new film just opening in New York and LA – Paradise Travel – based on a same title novel by Jorge Franco, a Columbian writer.  Sounds kind of dark.  The book has been translated into English.

But that led to this Macmillan Pub. site to movie tie-ins from books (and screenplays).

More Books into Movies (http://us.macmillan.com/all/editorslist/General/AdaptationsBooksfromthePagetotheMovieScreen)

I didn’t care much for In Bruges, except for the scenery.  But I am interested in When Did You Last See Your Father, based on the memoir by Blake Morrison.  Has the film been released, starring Colin Firth and Jim Broadbent. (We talked about Broadbent not too long ago, but I don’t remember what he played in.)

Another surprise from this list was Jar City, based on the book by Icelandic writer Arnaldur Indridason.  His works have been discussed on RATW, but I didn’t know a film was in the offing.

Seems to me I’ve heard of Snow Angels, from Stewart O’Nan’s book.  Has anyone seen that?

Check it out.  What have you seen and liked recently.

The other night I watched the German film Beyond Silence -- fantastic.  Five Netflix stars.  About a child, talented musician, whose parents are deaf.  Don't know if it's based on a book. English subtitles.  The parents are played by deaf actors, one French, one American.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 25, 2009, 01:13:09 PM
(We talked about Broadbent not too long ago, but I don’t remember what he played in.)
Jim Broadbent was talked about here for playing John Bayley in "Iris",but since then, the latest Harry Potter movie has come out, and he does an excellent job as Professor Horace Slughorn, a new character in this volume.

How good was the movie ("Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince")?  I have a lot of complaints.  They made the choice to go for gee-whiz flashy special effects over connected story telling, and added some new, unnecessary, bits to the story at the cost of leaving out stuff.  But it's good enough that Potter fans will want to see it.

I suspect that anyone who hasn't read the book would have a lot of trouble making any sense whatever of the plot.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 29, 2009, 09:59:52 AM
And, PatH, a recent NTtimes article commented about the emphasis on alcohol and drinking, with parents wondering about the messages being sent to young people.

We all love Nora Ephron, right?  And the words “food stylist” is part of your everyday vocabulary?  And Julie Powell has always been a household word.  Maybe not.  But here comes the movie, starring Meryl Streep and Amy Adams, based on her book about a year of cooking up every in Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking, a combination of two true stories – hers and Julia’s.

And Nora Ephron?  Director and screenwriter.   And taster and approver of every bit of food cooked and shown in the movie.  Here’s the link:

Julie and Julia Cook (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/29/dining/29movie.html)

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 29, 2009, 08:13:19 PM
That's a great link, Pedln, especially to a foodie like me.  The Washington Post had an article this morning connected with a preview of the movie.  Opinions of her friends were divided as to how well the movie and Streep caught the spirit of Julia, but a lot of them thought they got it right.  Interesting that you have to doctor a recipe to get it to splat properly when someone drops it on the floor.  Julia worked for the OSS in Southeast Asia, she claimed only as a clerk, but the Post says it's now confirmed that she also did some spying.  I like to think so.

From your link: "Mr. Flynn had to debone 60 ducks over the course of “Julie & Julia.” "  Boy, I bet he was pretty slick by the end.  I've deboned one duck in the course of my cooking career.  It's not difficult if you started out as a Zoology major and took comparative anatomy, but it's picky and slow.  I'd love to watch him in action.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 29, 2009, 08:27:11 PM
Drinking in the Harry Potter movie:  I don't see it as an emphasis.  The main drinking scene is one in which Harry watches while Hagrid and Professor Slughorn get drunk (they are mourning the death of Hagrid's pet giant spider).  Harry is carefully not drinking, because what he really wants is to manipulate Slughorn into doing something for him, and the whole thing sends a message of how dumb it is to drink a lot.  There is more drinking elsewhere, but it seemed pretty understated to me, and I didn't see it as an issue.  I will surely see the movie again, and I'll report if I see it differently then.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 04, 2009, 03:09:16 PM
 
Quote
I suspect that anyone who hasn't read the book would have a lot of trouble making any sense whatever of the plot.

Thanks for the warning,  Pat

 
Quote
Harry is carefully not drinking, because what he really wants is to manipulate Slughorn into doing something for him, and the whole thing sends a message of how dumb it is to drink a lot
.

.   .    . and for setting it straight about the drinking scenes.

Has anyone seen the film Lost in Austen -- apparently from a British TV miniseries. I'd never heard of it before.  A modern girl switches place with Elizabeth Bennet and tries to help the Bennet sisters find husbands.  Problems occur and she finds herself in trouble. It's said to be a fun, humorous show.  A must for Austen fans, but enjoyable even if you're not.  Son's family has it from Netflix, and I hope to watch it this week.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 04, 2009, 03:23:13 PM
Not about a book-into-movie, but a remake of a play-into-movie.  Did y'all see that Steven Spielberg is going to make a modern version of "Harvey"?  The cast has not been chosen, or at least not announced.  I dunno about that.  We shall see.  Daughter says probably Tom Hanks would play Elwood P. Dowd.  I can see him in that part.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on August 04, 2009, 04:21:45 PM
It's hard to imagine a cast that could do a better job than the one in the original Harvey : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvey_(film)

For some reason this link isn't working but I've checked it two times and it is the correct URL.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 05, 2009, 08:43:49 AM
Good casting, MARY.  Tom Hanks would make a very good Elwood Dowd.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 05, 2009, 06:08:02 PM
Tom Hanks would, Babi, but right now I can't picture anyone other than Jimmy Stewart.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 06, 2009, 08:28:54 AM
Ah, Jimmy Stewart.  I don't think he ever made a movie I didn't love.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on August 07, 2009, 08:24:39 PM
I just saw Julia and Julie which is based on the book (by the same name?) Not sure but the movie is really sweet, and Streep nails Julia Child amazingly well, that hunch over a piece of meat, she must have worked on that little mannerism in a sea of accurate takes for a long long time. It's perfect.


I had read the book by Child about My Life in France, the movie does a nice job of including SOME of that stuff but not all. Stanley Tucci does a super job of being Paul Child, but they don't mention his photographs for the book or some of his jobs in the movie.  The book (My Life in France) gives a slightly different impression of his work but it's a small quibble, obviously they both supported each other, beautifully shown in the movie.

I haven't finished the book yet. A lot of critics (2 today, the Wall Street Journal and People Magazine as disparate as those might seem) seem to feel less Julie and more Julia would have been better, just a movie on Julia Child herself.

SPOILER:

The movie ends without her becoming a TV star and also raises the question that Child herself did not care for the blog of "Julie" on her project. I wonder if that's true.

What did you all think of the movie (or the book) if you read or saw either?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 07, 2009, 10:22:16 PM
It would be a little hard for Julia Child to have an objection to a blog since she passed away Aug. 13, 2004.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 08, 2009, 09:11:25 AM
 GINNY, I posted on "JUlie and Julia" in the library, if you want to read that.
I just started on the book, and I'm finding some of the humor really crude and
Miss Powell's description of her lifestyle less than appealing. What kind of
image does it convey to write: "I love my husband like a pig loves shit."
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on August 08, 2009, 09:44:11 AM
Frybabe, in the movie Julie kept hoping to meet Julia. A reporter calls her and says that Julia dislikes the idea or the blog (which apparently ?? went on before the book was published in 2005).  But if it were only a YEAR? I am really confused over these elements.

I sat there the whole movie and thought but she was deceased when you wrote the blog and when you hoped to meet her. Apparently not? Apparently she was in her late 80's maybe 89 when the blog was going on. Did she die at 91 in 2002?

In Edit: Nope, wrong again: Julia Child: August 15, 1912 – August 13, 2004.

It's confusing, it really was, one of the confusing things about the movie.

Babi I'm still reading it also.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 08, 2009, 10:03:37 AM
Julia was alive during the blog which was earlier than that. It took over a year for the blog to be edited to the book, maybe more.
As I remember someone asked Julia about the blog and she was quite old and confused about what a blog was. I think she thought they were making fun of her , so she was short with them about not really wanting to meet new people.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 08, 2009, 02:35:59 PM
I've only read reviews, not the book, but am thinking that one of the reviews said Julie started the blog in 2002.  So that would work for Julia having had a chance to see it before she died.

The reviews i read really tore Julie apart, saying she was very self-involved. And like the reviewers Ginny spoke of, would have preferred much less Julie and more Julia.  The critics also remarked about the wonderful love story of Julia and her husband Paul.

I can't wait to see it, but will wait for the DVD.  And maybe have a chance to read the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 08, 2009, 08:09:33 PM
So the blog is something that went on before the movie? The blog is not a result of the movie but a motivation to make the movie? And the book was written from the blog? Is this a first - from blog to book to movie? I don't follow blogs so I forget how long they have been around.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on August 08, 2009, 08:14:54 PM
Julia's cookbook was first; Julie wanted to cook all Julia's recipes, and blog about it; then they published Julie's book, and from that, we have the movie=Julia & Julie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 08, 2009, 08:57:01 PM
I am about to read Harlan Coben's, Tell No One. Just on a whim, I Googled Coben and discovered that this book is now a movie. They apparently released it to DVD on March 31. Has anyone seen it? Looks like a low budget thing. Never heard of the leading actors. Didn't catch who directed.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 09, 2009, 08:49:56 AM
  FRYBABE, Julie Powell started the blog at the suggestion of her husband, who
was trying to find something to hold her interest.  From her book I gather she
is a rather mercurial person.  She had become interested in an old Julia Child
cookbook, and decided to make that the theme of her blog., ie., she would make all the recipes in one year and talk about it in her blog.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 09, 2009, 09:27:56 AM
Yes, at the time of the blog, she was working part time , had  a degree in writing and was convinced she was wasting her life. She got involved in the blog from her husbands  approval of the subject and really blossomed.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 09, 2009, 04:00:27 PM
Frybabe, I saw the movie about a year ago in NY -- it's French, with English subtitles.  At the time I had no idea that it wa from a book, and I've never read anything by Harlan Coben.  I thought it was a good movie, good acting, suspenseful.  Glad to know the DVD is out.  I might want to watch it again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 09, 2009, 04:18:01 PM
The other night I watched Lost in Austen, where 21st century Amanda Price slips through a door into Pride and Prejudice and changes places with Elizabeth Bennet.  Some fans might be horrified at the liberties taken, but it's all in good fun.  I thoroughly enjoyed it, even though I fell asleep and missed the ending, which I rewatched today.  Be warned -- it is three hours long, so start early.  (We didn't start here until after 10 pm, so no wonder the sandman came.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 09, 2009, 05:41:22 PM
Pedln, thanks for the info on the film. I may just grab the DVD and share it with my sister. Already, I know she will just love the book and movie (she is a film junky).

Lost in Austen sounds like great fun. Three hours? I watched The Jane Austen Book Club a month or so ago. I liked that too.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on August 09, 2009, 08:11:51 PM
The New York Times today magazine has a gigantic article on Julia  Child and how we've changed as a nation vis a vis cooking and cooking shows. I think it's not positive but have just started it. It does show a photo of Juila Chlid behind her counter cooking with a whole bunch of people squatting behind her, one is handing her a plate. :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on August 10, 2009, 08:18:23 AM
 AND the new issue of Time contains somewhat of a....unflattering view of "Julie," and the information that the Efron movie contains Julia Child's actual reaction and why, it's a bit different from the confusion on blogs that Frybabe posted, and more in tune with "Julie's" desire (to be famous and a writer) rather than the cooking part. What an interesting controversy.

Frybabe, let us know how  you liked the Coben, I've never read one of his and he's all over the place now.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 10, 2009, 08:27:57 AM
Coben is an interesting writer. He writes a series about Myron Bolivar.. Who is a sports agent that gets involved in mysteries. Quite funny in spots and good. He also writes stand alones and they are much darker and generaly involve mistaken identites and revenge.. Very good.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 10, 2009, 08:47:18 AM
So far, I like Tell No One a lot. It is shaping up to be a bit gory which is not to my taste, but the story is so good so far anyway. In fact, since there was nothing going on at work on Sat. night, I read a little at the end of shift. Almost forgot to leave at shift end.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 11, 2009, 07:54:20 AM
 I made a good start on Julie Powell' "Julie and Juliet", but decided not to
continue. I found that I liked Miss Powell less and less, so I saw no point in
making myself read all about her.  I didn't like her attitude, her language, her
self-involvement... or her housekeeping!  Anything so bad it makes your landlady break into tears when she sees what you're leaving behind?  A stove
so filthy no one wants to touch it, and she's been cooking on it?!!
  I'll go see the movie, since Meryl Streep is reported to be so good, but I'm
returning the book to the library today.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 13, 2009, 11:26:27 AM
Sounds like a wise decision,Babi.  There are only so many hours in the day, so why waste them on something you don't like.

I've just finished watching The Miracle of St. Anna, about a group of African-American soldiers in a small town in Italy during WWII.  I didn't realize at the time that it was from a book by the same name by James MacBride.  I enjoyed the movie, but it was bloody at times, also confusing at times, (it jumped around) and having to get another disc from Netflix because the first one proved bad didn't help.  Probably 3 1/2 stars.

Have any of you watched Netflix films on your computer or TV?  While at my son's I watched Blame it on Fidel (a French film) on my laptop, and the family has their large screen TV hooked up to an old dead computer with a new motherboard, so they can see Netflix films. (We both have wireless routers.) If I had a VGA port on my TV all I would need would be a cable to connect to my laptop VGA port and bring in Netflix.  But I don't have one and since Netflix can't stream captions or English subtitles yet it wouldn't be worth any investment for me.  But Netflix sells something called a Roku ($99) and all you need is an Internet connection (don't need wireless) to download the films to your TV.  They have English subtitles on the foreign films, and are working on technology to provide them on streamed English language films.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 13, 2009, 01:10:07 PM
I don't think I'd like watching a movie on my computer - screen too small.  Plus we couldn't watch something together.

We just got the second Harry Potter movie,HP and the Chamber of Secrets .  It's only for 7-days, so we'll can't dawdle in watching. ::)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 13, 2009, 07:20:55 PM
I don't think I'd like watching a movie on my computer - screen too small.  Plus we couldn't watch something together.


Actually, Maryz, it's not too bad.  I've watched on a portable DVD player before, and the laptop is bigger -- although mine is small, for travelling -- about 11 inches.  My youngest and her partner don't have a TV, so I've watched films with them on their laptop.  Of course, they let me sit in the middle, so I probably had the best view.   :D

Enjoy Harry Potter.  My DC grandkids generously let me bring all five of their Harry Potters home with me.  I guess now that they're all teen-agers they don't repeat-watch as much as they used to. Though they'd all seen the new film.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 14, 2009, 08:36:57 AM
 Ah, that brings back memories.  Relatives next door had 'our' first TV, with it's
very small screen. I can remember both families gathered in front of it,
all hunched over and leaning forward to watch a wee Milton Berle!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on August 14, 2009, 09:29:32 AM
aahhh ~ Babi ~  Me, too, and do you remember My Little Margie?   And being allowed to stay up late for Saturday night movies at 11 p.m. on that tiny screen?    
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 14, 2009, 10:07:38 AM
This is a bit off topic, but I have to tell it anyway -- going back to the early days of media.

One of my uncles by marriage was named Harry Johnson, and he loved to tell about when his family got their first radio.  They turned it on, and the first thing that came out was someone singing a song that went -- "How do you do, Mrs. Johnson, how do you do?"  Harry's mother just about fainted and said, "turn that thing off," and it was quite a while before they turned it on again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on August 14, 2009, 10:39:41 AM
 :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 15, 2009, 09:35:37 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movie2150.jpg)
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?

_______________________________

Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Sources for Films from Books (http://www.library.sjsu.edu/research/web/iguide_subjectList.htm?t=41&catID=1044)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Books in a Series by Their Authors (http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/K_Authors/K_Authors.html)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)



Oh Pedlin, I did love that.. I can imagine their faces.
By the way we went to see Julia-Julie.. Meryl Streep is a wonder indeed, but Amy is too sweet to be Julie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 15, 2009, 06:46:44 PM
I was just cruising the lists of recent books into movies.

Where the Wild Things Are must be a musical. Hope it does well.

I bought the book, The Alchemist, but haven't read it yet. I didn't see a release date on the movie.

The Last Templar as a movie was a bit weak, I thought. I think that is the book I bought several months back, still on my TBR pile.



Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 15, 2009, 09:59:35 PM
We just finished watching Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, #2 in the series.  We're working our way through the movies, on loan from our library.  They're such fun.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 16, 2009, 08:51:14 AM
  I think everybody feels that way about Harry Potter, MARY.  So what if it
is all about kids and magic; the books and movies are thoroughly enjoyable.
I'm eagerly waiting for the latest Potter movie to be released to DVD so I can
watch it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 16, 2009, 09:54:29 AM
Babi, I am with you. I will get the latest Harry Potter, watch it and then I send it on to my grandson who is almost 8 and loves them..
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 16, 2009, 12:17:14 PM
Our Jean was planning to see the new HP in I-max on Friday.  I'll be "chatting" with her (via gmail) shortly.  I'll post a review later.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 16, 2009, 01:14:12 PM
Jean's only comment about the new HP movie was "very good".  That's pretty high praise from her.  :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 17, 2009, 07:16:42 AM
 My grandson, STEPH, is in his late twenties, a fact which never ceases to
amaze me.  All three of my grandchildren are old enough to have children of
their own, but not a one does.  On the one hand, I am pleased none of them
rushed into marriage too young.  On the other hand, I'm not getting any
younger and I'd love to hold a great-grandchild.  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 17, 2009, 07:38:16 AM
Our sons both married late.. 30's rather than 20's.. One son has two children, but did not have them right away, So he is in his 40's with a 13 and an 8 year old. The other son did not want and does not have children.. So I would guess I will not get any great grandchildren..
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 18, 2009, 08:19:12 AM
 Enjoy the grands while you can.  For most of their lives, mine have been far
away and I only saw them...or see them now....all too seldom.  But they have
their lives to lead, and I'm proud of all (3) of them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 18, 2009, 08:30:18 AM
By the way,, any of you that saw Julia-Julie.. I loved the small insert of her sister and  her courtship.. The woman who played the sister is truly a funny lady. I have seen her in a number of small parts. She gave you with such a small part, the meaning of love and not having to do with who is tall and who is not.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on August 23, 2009, 08:11:39 PM
I saw a great show on TCM today, Geo Clooney's father - sorry i don't remember his first name - did an hour interview w/ Angela Lansbury and they talked about and showed clips from all her movies and her Broadway shows. It was really terrific. TCM than broadcast a marathon of her movies, Gaslight, her first movie when she was 17 is on right now, 8pm my time. i looked to see if they were repeating the interview, but i don't see that they are. I'm sure some of her movies came from books - maybe Manchurian Candidate?................jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 23, 2009, 08:40:48 PM
That sounds interesting, Jean.  Was/is the senior Clooney an actor too?  Or involved in the film industry?  I've always enjoyed Angela Lansbury.  How old is she now?  She certainly doesn't look aged.

Why am I thinking Gaslight was a silent film starring Charlie Chaplin?  Was it?   ???
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 23, 2009, 09:45:17 PM
Here's the IMDb link for Gaslight. (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0036855/)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on August 23, 2009, 10:02:25 PM
According to imdb, Angela Lansbury was born in 1925, so she's 84.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on August 23, 2009, 10:25:42 PM
AL was only 17 when she did Gaslight and got a nomination for best supporting actress. I'm not sure how to read the chart in IMBd. I don't think she won. oh, yeah took another look, no she didn't win.  The senior Clooney was in radio and local tv, i believe. .....................AL's mother was an actress for a few years before she had children and was apparently very supportive and helpful in AL's career.................AL was just so positive and kind in every comment she made about the various people Clooney asked her about that she had worked with...............The senior Clooney does many interviews on TCM and seems to have a wonderful grasp on movie history..................jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 23, 2009, 11:01:29 PM
George’s father Nick Clooney has been a journalist, columnist, politician, in Kentucky and Ohio, and hosted the ABC game show The Money Maze.  His sister is Rosemary Clooney.  He spent the 2008-09 academic year at DC’s American University as the “distinguished journalist in residence.”

Has anyone read his 2002 book, Movies That Changed Us?  No wonder he knows so much about movies.

And I don’t know my lights.  Charlie Chaplin starred in Limelight.

Netflix has Gaslight, which has both captions and English subtitles.  There are two Gaslights -- one in 1940 and the Joseph Cotton, Ingrid Bergman, A. Lansbury one in 1944.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on August 24, 2009, 12:45:33 AM
Thanks Pedin - interesting info.................yes, "Nick," I should remember that...........jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 24, 2009, 08:34:40 AM
 I saw that 'Gaslight' was on TV this weekend.  I had no idea that it was part
of an Angela Lansbury film marathon.  I didn't even realize Lansbury was in "Gaslight"; I only remembered Ingrid Bergman.  I'll keen an eye on that
series; I imagine I will want to watch some of those old films. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 27, 2009, 01:02:09 PM
Angela Lansbury was so young in Gaslight. A totally different face when young..
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 28, 2009, 08:12:32 AM
 What channel is presenting the Lansbury film series?  I haven't seen them
listed, but I haven't checked the late night shows. Maybe that's where they are.
  Meanwhile, I see she is going to be doing a Broadway musical, "A Little Night
Music", with Catherine Zeta-Jones.  A Broadway show, at 83!!!  Heavens, the
stamina the woman must have!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 28, 2009, 10:12:23 AM
John's reading The Treasure of Sierra Madre.  I don't think I knew that had been a book before it was a movie. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on August 28, 2009, 09:34:39 PM
Angela Lansbury was 17 when she made Gaslight. .................. The program about her and the marathon of her movies was on TCM, i think that stands for Turner Classic Movies......................jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 29, 2009, 08:59:56 AM
 Thanks, JEAN. Now I need to check and see if TCM is freely available or is one
of the Premium pay channels.  Lansbury has had such a long career, but it seems she just missed being a big name star.  I can't think of a movie in which
she starred, other than the 'Bedknobs...' one, that has survived as a classic.
I see from Netflix that she was in "The Harvey Girls", but she wasn't the star.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 29, 2009, 09:42:47 AM
Lansbury until the tv series was always considered more of a character actress. Very pretty, but never given much work.. I think she might have been the Mom in a picture.."The Manchurian Candidate" but not quite sure.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on August 29, 2009, 01:17:05 PM
TCM is a standard, basic cable channel.  Should be able to get it if you have cable or satellite.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on August 29, 2009, 05:00:06 PM
yes, she wasa the Mom in Manchurian Candidate, altho she was only 4 or 5 yrs older than her "son," Laurence Harvey. She was also in The Picture of Dorian Gray and Death on the Nile and did the voices for a couple of very good animation movies. She had her best success, at least as awards go on Broadway in Mame, Gypsy and Sweeney Todd and others.
Here's a good bio.

http://us.imdb.com/name/nm0001450/bio

Jean
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on August 31, 2009, 07:28:06 AM
I thought I remembered her in the Manchurian Candidate.. And did remember that she and the star were roughly the same age.. Still as I remember she looked right in it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 09, 2009, 11:22:28 AM
It’s been a little quiet here, but here’s a film from a book that may surprise you, and a link to an article that will tell you all about it.

2009 is the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his “On the Origin of Species.”  Lots of stuff going on in celebration of this.  One that applies to us here is the world premiere of Creation, the first full-length film about Darwin for the big screen.  And it’s  based on a book called “Annie’s Box: Charles Darwin, his Daughter, and Human Evolution,” by Randal Keynes. Keynes is one of Darwin’s great-great-grandsons.

Quote
“Unlike most biographies of Darwin, its central event is not the publication of the “Origin,” but the death of Darwin’s adored eldest daughter, Annie, at the age of 10. She died in 1851 after nine months of a mysterious illness; at the time of her death, she was not at home, but in the English spa town of Malvern, where she had been sent for treatment.  

Annie’s death is also the central event of this beautifully shot film. For “Creation” is not a didactic film: its main aim is not the public understanding of Darwin’s ideas, but a portrait of a bereaved man and his family. The man just happens to be one of the most important thinkers in human history.

At the same time, we see his view of nature — a wasteful, cruel, violent place, where wasps lay their eggs in the living flesh of caterpillars, chicks fall from the nest and die of starvation, and the fox kills and eats the rabbit. “
From the NY Times.

The Creation of Charles Darwin (http://judson.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/08/the-creation-of-charles-darwin/)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 10, 2009, 08:13:42 AM
 Violent, undoubtedly.  Survival does depend on a feeding chain among the wild.
 It would be a very slanted approach, in my view, to portray only that aspect
of nature.  However, if that was Darwin's view, it's only honest to say so.
I don't think I'd care to watch it, tho'. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 11, 2009, 12:09:16 PM
I think the focus of the film is not limited to his views of nature, but also about his family life and the impact of his daughter's death.  She was his eldest and his favorite.

Have you all been watching the series about Inspector Lewis -- Inspector Morse's former seargent?  They're excellent, and while not written by Colin Dexter, they're making me want to reread and view some of his works.

Another film from a book -- The Private Lives of Pippa Lee by Rebecca Miller.  I'm not familiar with either book or film which is now showing at the Toronto International Film Festival.  The lead is Robin Wright Penn, wife, now in the process of divorce, from Sean Penn.  Miller is also the director of the film.

And here’s another book/film from the Toronto Festival – An Education, from a memoir by British journalist Lynn Barber, the screenplay written by Nick Hornby. Reviews are comparing the lead, Carey Mulligan, to Audrey Hepburn

What films are you reading these days?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 11, 2009, 02:33:05 PM
I recently saw an interview w/ Carol Higgins Clark on NJ PBS, she and her Mother Mary Higgins Clark have written some "Christmas mysteries" together. Her Mother lives in NJ and Carol grew up in Saddle River, which is why she was a show titled NJ Notables.
She said that the last Christmas book has been optioned for a movie and will be out for C-mas 2010. ........I wonder what happened to a movie of the Evanovich Plum series? Five or six yrs ago Evanovich said that she had an option for a movie and had on her website requests for who her fans tho't should play the various characters and that's the last  I heard of it. I immediately tho't of Sandra Bullock to be SP. ............ hope it hasn't fallen thru..........altho it would be a great tv series. ....... jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 12, 2009, 08:47:15 AM
Anyone who is being compared to Audrey Hepburn has my immediate interest,
PEDLN. Such a wonderful actress and gracious lady. I would love to see
her like again.

 I'm also an admirer of Sandra Bullock. I will happily watch anything she is in.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 12, 2009, 11:31:04 AM
Jean, I'll bet there are a lot of books that give birth to movie rumors.  A Mary Higgins Clark (and daughter) film ought to be good.  I've read some of MHC, but not daughter.  Did not know there was a film in the making.

Earlier this year there was something about The Lovely Bones coming out in film -- I think Bookmarks mentioned it.  But I have not heard anything since.

What I'm really waiting for is the supposedly forthcoming production of Erik Larson's The Devil in White City -- about the 1893 Chicago Exposition and the serial murders that occurred at the same time.

Does anybody know?

One film, long anticipated (by some, a few   ;D ) that is now on reel is Elmore Leonard's Killshot.  I'm not a Leonard fan, but my f2f group read it a few years back because parts of the proposed film were to be shot in Cape Girardeau.  There was much hoopla here, of course, when Hollywood came to town, but then everything came to a halt.  Now supposedly someone has a tape of it or can get it, and the f2f group is going to view it at her house in December.  We shall see.  While reading the book, my group was quite impressed with the research Leonard had put into the town, especially the use of barges on the Mississippi.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on September 12, 2009, 12:42:48 PM
Would you believe I just spent the evening watching a film 'Anne of Green Gables' on TV. I thought it was excellent - haven't a clue who the actors were but they all suited their parts perfectly. Hadn't read the book since I was a girl and had never seen the film. Enjoyed it immensely. Nostalgia I guess.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on September 15, 2009, 08:30:56 AM
I saw a preview of Lovely Bones, so it must be coming sometime in the future.. I loved the book
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 15, 2009, 10:09:14 AM
I did too, Steph, and remember when our late DL Lorrie led a wonderful discussion of it.

Last night I watched a film that I am not recommending -- Autumn Hearts, with Christopher Plummer, Susan Sarondon, Max von Sydow, from a book Emotional Arithmetic by Matt Cohen.  (Have never heard of him or it) A group of former Holocaust victims are gathered together for a small reunion.  The acting was fine, but it was one of those films where y ou needed a lot more background and past history of the characters, which may or may not have been in the book.  I'm giving it two Netflix stars (which means didn't like it) -- it was okay, but there was something lacking.  This was a Canadian film, and most certainly an Indie film.  It reminded me of those films that use "lay" actors who don't have a script.

The NYT had an interesting article this morning about where films and the film industry, especially the Indie films, are heading.

Exploring New Routes to the Indies (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/13/movies/13darg.html)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: elizabeth84 on September 16, 2009, 10:53:38 AM
Speaking of Darwin's anniversary, Pedlin, here's another one: One thousand years ago this year, Al Hakim reduced the Church of the Most Holy Sepulchure in Jerusalem to rubble--ground level.  The church foundation is believed to cover the site of Christ's crucifixion and burial.  I can't think of a recent movie that celebrates (ahem) the event.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on September 17, 2009, 08:41:36 AM
Poor Jerusalem.. The religions have spent years tearing apart each others holy places.. The sins committed in the name of religion are numerous and horrible.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 17, 2009, 11:13:58 AM
Elizabeth, welcome to Books into Movies.  We're glad  you found your way here.  An interesting anniversary that you spoke of.  I didn't know that.

Steph, I think I'd have to agree with you about the sins committed in the name of religion.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on September 18, 2009, 08:34:38 AM

(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)




Newest book to for sure make a movie would be the new Dan Brown..
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 18, 2009, 01:35:20 PM
Watched The Other Boelyn girl, last night. I had read the book, but had not yet seen the movie.  Does anyone know if the "mary story" has any validity? They rushed thru the Anne/Henry marriage pretty quickly. It seemed as tho the director suddenly realized that s/he had spent too much time on the pre-marriage segments and now had to finish.

The beach scene when Anne returned from France was almost identical to the opening scenes in The Lion in Winter.................the settings and wardrobe were beautful and very interesting to see. I did get a little tired of seeing Henry purposely striding down the hallways. But mostly the acting was good ...................jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 19, 2009, 08:48:09 AM
Hmmm!  I don't know, JEAN.  From what you describe, I think I'd rather
re-view "Lion in Winter".  I do get annoyed with movies that have to fill in
the plot with lots of 'striding down halls' blank spaces.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Steph on September 19, 2009, 02:27:44 PM
Lion in Winter was a better movie, but the actors were better, so it follows the movie would be. I saw this one.. I have always been intrigued by the Boleyn family and the answer is yes... Henrys first interest was Mary.. But no idea whether Anne cared. At that moment she was enthralled by a Border lord named ( I think) Percy..
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 29, 2009, 09:29:50 AM
Has anyone read anything by Susan Minot?  Over the weekend I watched Evening from her book with the same title, with Vanessa Redgrave, Hugh Dancy and also in small roles, Glenn Close and Meryl Streep.

It was okay, jumped around a lot, but I enjoyed it -- probably a Netflix 3.  Vanessa Redgrave is an amazing actress.  She plays a terminally ill old woman and is still the star.  Reviewers say the book is so much better.  Well, sure, aren't they always.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on September 30, 2009, 09:18:06 PM
Oh good,  movies too! That's a natural with this group of astute viewers.  I've got the popcorn! Thank you Pedln for this expansion.

I've just seen (for the 4th time) Valentino The Last Emperor. I'm obsessed with it. It's fabulous. DID you see it and what did you think of it? The DVD has 4 I think bonus films on it, I've seen each about 5 times each.

It won 9 awards and was the highest rated documentary this year by far. JUST out  on DVD.

 Now a new movie, also highly acclaimed,  has come out on  Coco Chanel, is it a documentary, too? What IS it with designers in this depression? Is it like the last depression and the Ziegfeld girls? They are in Valentino, too.

 I loved Valentino, barely knew who he was and it's absolutely charming.As it turned out I happened to stumble into his last 45th anniversary show at the Ara Pacis in Rome in 2007.

This is my photo but you can see the same thing in the movie: (http://seniorlearn.org/latin/graphics/ara2red.jpg) Funny, after waiting so long for the Ara Pacis to open, I was somewhat put off to see the fashion there, and he didn't want it there as he said he never liked the Ara Pacis and it turned out to be  brilliant, I learned something from the experience, and  he ended up liking it and showing Karl Lagerfeld around who also liked it.  The movie's got a lot in it.

I can't run downstairs like that 77 year old man, I can tell you that, loved it, just loved it. 

What a world he lives in, which he's created around himself. Have any of you seen it? It's hard to leave. :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on October 01, 2009, 03:54:09 PM
I watched Some Came Running yesterday on TCM. It is from a James Jones novel.

The script was bad, but Frank Sinatra and Shirley McClain were good and fun to watch. Altho Vincente Minelli directed the movie, it had some strange action in it.

 I have such an ambiguous feeling about Frank S. He was a good actor, but the stories about him make me think i would not have liked him as a person. Of course, there are stories of his generosity and kindness as well as his arrogance, bullying and mafia connections. He apparently was kind to Sammie DAvis and Mia Britt ( I don't think that's the way you spell her first name - i have forgotten) at a time when their marriage was controvesial. Dean Martin is not a good actor, but i like looking at him  :P, and he does have a comic sense that i like. ........... jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on October 01, 2009, 04:36:17 PM
Mabel: I feel the same way, almost guilty for enjoying his acting and his singing, since he was not at all a nice man. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 02, 2009, 08:24:57 AM
 Face it, ladies.  Talent is not confined to the pure of heart.   Not that there's
too many of those around.  Acknowledgement and appreciation of a gift is not approval of the bad behavior of the possessor.  The talent doesn't excuse the
behavior, but the behavior doesn't negate the talent.
  I think Frank Sinatra falls into the category of the survivor...the man who  became what he was because he had to do so to survive and succeed. And where he could, it seems he put out a hand to help others survive and succeed as well.
   There are many authors with rough and/or questionable backgrounds. The quality of their work still has to stand on its own merits. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on October 02, 2009, 09:48:17 AM
Well think about it a minute: why would you want to act, anyway?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 02, 2009, 01:26:04 PM
Quote
Talent is not confined to the pure of heart. 


Babi, I love that.  So true.  And who was that bad boy of tennis?  And just this week Timothy Egan at the NYT had his editorial about presidential secrets.  Oooh, some of the things they said about other people.

You may have noticed in the heading, we don’t just talk books and movies any more. We all want to know all about all the things you view, and how you like them -- or not.  There’ll be some other changes coming to the heading, including some new links.

Speaking of or not – last night I watched, but didn’t finish the Mayles documentary of the Beales of Gray Gardens.  I think it will be my first ever Netflix 1 star – I really hated it.  It just didn’t seem to be any more than a stream of consciousness.  I’m still keeping the movie version of their life on my Netflix queue because I’d like to know more about their lives, just not from their mouths.  Must admit, though, the wardrobe – sad, but interesting.

Ginny, interesting about the Valentino film.  And thanks for the picture.  He’s 77 and can run downstairs?  Lucky.

Let's hear from you.  What is everyone watching these days?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 02, 2009, 03:52:52 PM
I watched THAT FORSYTE WOMAN, the 1949 film with Greer Garson, Errol Flynn, Robert Young, and Janet Leigh.  I had never watched a Greer Garson film, and this was an interesting one. Not a role she usually played. Errol Flynn was great as her cold, jealous husband, except I'd always heard he was gay, so that bothered me a bit as I watched him playing her husband.  Robert Young IMO was very miscast as her lover, and it was a different role for him, as well as Garson.  I hadn't recognized Janet Leigh until I looked at the cast list after watching the film, but she was also very good.

Now I want to read the John Galsworthy trilogy, THE FORSYTE SAGA (also made into a TV movie I had seen.)

Oh yes, and my son took me to the drive-in to see Bruce Willis's latest, Surrogates.  Has anyone seen it, or am I the only one who likes Bruce Willis films?  This was about a future world where people live in isolation in their homes and have robot surrogates do their work and interact with the outside world for them.  I don't care much for these new sci-fi technology films (hard for me to follow, and I had a hard time figuring out who was the human and who was the surrogate.)  I've seen better Willis films.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 02, 2009, 04:06:52 PM
Is Greer Garson the actress who said "I vant to be alone."?

My mother and aunt were always using that quote for some reason or other, usually when I was pestering them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on October 02, 2009, 04:41:39 PM
/GretaGarbo.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 02, 2009, 04:47:27 PM
No, that was the Swedish actress Greta Garbo who said "I vant to be alone."  I don't think I ever watched one of her movies for more than a few minutes.  That's all I could stand of her acting.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 02, 2009, 05:21:08 PM
 ;D  I knew Greer Garson was wrong, but couldn't think of who else began with "G"
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 02, 2009, 08:00:55 PM
Marjifay, the Forsyte Saga is actually 6 books, but you don't have to read them all.  They kind of shift down to later generations, and you can stop if you get tired of it.  The first ones are the best.  There were 2 TV series.  I saw the first one many decades ago.  It was a perfect job of translating book to screen.  The second one got good reviews too, but I didn't see it.

I haven't seen "Surrogates", but I do like Bruce Willis.  Checking his movies in IMDB, I see I've seen 12 Monkeys, The 5th Element, and 6th Sense.  Maybe I like all his movies with numbers in them.  I'm good on sci-fi, maybe I should see Surrogates, even without a number.  Which Willis films do you like?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on October 02, 2009, 11:21:26 PM
Speaking of Sf are you watching Flashforward on TV?  for 150 seconds, the same 150 seconds, the entire world blacks out.  Ths is the story of the survivors.

Also on the SF TV front the BBC series Primeval has been renewed for two more "seasons".  In this  one there are intermittent gates called events to Earth's prehistory.  They are discovered when these strange animals start popping up, first around a particular woodland outside London.  Then rogue events appear and the situation goes downhill.  Check this one out at Netflix.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 03, 2009, 09:10:58 AM
  I enjoy Bruce Willis films, MARJ. They are brash and crammed full of
derring-do, but Willis looks tough enough to pull it off. "The Sixth
Sense" was a departure from his usual tough guy roles and gave him more
scope as an actor, IMO.  It was a very good film.  I'm planning on seeing
"Surrogates" when Netflix has it.
  I've seen the opening show of "Flash Forward" and it immediately had me
thinking/talking about my ideas re. future events.  I'll continue watching
it unless it turns into a soap opera with only that one SF event as a
starting point.  
 I'd never heard about "Primeval" until you mentioned it here, JACKIE. It sounds
interesting, tho'.  I'll have to check Netflix for it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on October 03, 2009, 09:33:49 AM
Oh I am too, on the death of John Mortimer,  and he wrote other things as well, good writer.

Pedln!! At last, somebody who has seen one of the Beale documentaries, but you hated it! One star? Why? Did you find it exploitative? Did you know that when Big Edie died Little Edie would not allow the Maysles at her funeral?

What did you think of it, tell all!

The second film, The Beales of Grey Gardens, the outtakes and rejects from the original was it 1970's documentary I think you're talking about, presented them in a more positive light and in fact they were quite impressive as strange as that sounds. All that hit the cutting room floor.

What did you hate about it? Them? The way the movie was shot? The fact it was shot at all?

Do tell!  One good thing it did was bring them help from Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on October 03, 2009, 09:59:51 AM
Armageddon, 12 Monkeys, The 5th Element, Mercury Rising, 6th Sense, Tears of the Sun. I suppose I could go on. Bruce Willis has been a busy boy. Looks like a bunch more coming in the next two years according to the IMBD list. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000246/

I was particularly fascinated by his drooling scene in 12 Monkeys. Not real interested in his Die Hard series though.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 03, 2009, 11:54:49 AM
Ginny, re: Beales.  I had thought it was going to be the original documentary.  It wasn't.  It was left over footage from the original 1973 production.  So, I was clueless about what was going on and the people they referred to, and to me it was just a lot of prancing around (little Edie) and talking about whatever popped into their minds. 

Perhaps I'll try it again after I see the HBO film version which is on my queue.  (After I watch the other 168 titles there    :-[ )

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 03, 2009, 02:13:05 PM
I guess my favorite Bruce Willis films were Pulp Fiction and Sixth Sense, both great.  Also liked The Jackal, Fifth Element and his Die Hard films.
I see I missed 12 Monkeys -- will  have to get that one.

Jackie, I saw the advertisement for Flashforward, but missed it.  Do you or anyone know what night and channel it's on?

Primeval sounds good.  I'll look into that one.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on October 03, 2009, 02:58:32 PM
Flashforward was on last night.  See here:  http://abc.go.com/watch/flashforward/235637?partner=rm&cid=KNC-rm+flashforward_title_fall_launch+google+flashforward
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 03, 2009, 04:22:38 PM
Thanks so much, Jackie.  Looks like I can see the first episode here after all.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on October 04, 2009, 02:19:24 PM
A good movie I got from Netflix:  "Outsourced".   A company outsources its fulfillment center to India, and sends a young manager to train his successor.  Culture clash ensues.  Terrifically funny, and sad.
A very clean movie, no killing, gore, cursing. 

Also, "New In Town" with Renee Zellweger & Harry Connick,Jr.   Predictable with slapstick comedy, and lots of funny lines.  Also, culture shock from going to Minnesota from Miami (in the dead of winter).  Not great filmmaking but totally enjoyable on the lighter side of the spectrum.  Basically good, clean fun!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on October 05, 2009, 10:39:10 AM
Hi, everyone!  Hi, Pedln, amica mea!

I guess all you movie watchers don't share a TV set with a husband who is into Baseball with a Capital B.   We are watching the playoffs this week, followed by the World you-know-what,  so no movies for me right now.

Friends and I were talking last week about the movie Marley!  
Did everyone here see it?  Like it?   EA in our Latin class heard John Grogan speak in person in PA a year or two ago.   I especially loved the Boca Raton parts because we've been to a few of the places in the movie.  Of course, I assume it's not a spoiler to say the ending was not anyone's favorite part.   But I'm a big-dog lover, so I loved all the dog scenes.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 06, 2009, 08:15:11 AM
 Declaration of Independence, MIPPY.  Smaller TVs are fairly inexpensive now. Unless you husband can't do without your 'participation' in viewing the baseball games,  get one of your own and retire to another room to watch what you please.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on October 06, 2009, 09:07:00 AM
Babi ~  You are so sweet to write that,    :)
but there's an unusual dynamic going on.   My husband
suffered a severe heart attack last winter, so every moment
we spend sitting together ... boo-ing the Yankees, haha ... is a
treasured moment!   

Movies can always be watched when it isn't baseball season!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 07, 2009, 08:40:09 AM
Ah, of course, that makes a big difference, MIPPY.  I fully understand; enjoy every minute with your DH. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on October 10, 2009, 07:27:32 PM
Tomereader, thank you for your recommendation of "Outsourced".  I read up on it and put it in my Netflix queue, it sounds great.  Something like  Gung Ho with Michael Keaton and the Japanese taking over a local automobile plant, which I loved.

If I could stop watching Valentino I'd be in good shape. I guess it's time to send it back to Netflix since my own copy has come. :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 11, 2009, 09:05:54 AM
 Val and I started watching a movie called "Tell No One".  After a short while
we looked at each other and agreed it was really boring and watched something else instead. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 11, 2009, 04:45:58 PM
You won't be disappointed with Outsourced, Ginny.  It has an interesting, unique plot.  Very enjoyable.

Babi, I'm sorry you didn't like Tell No One -- that's based on the book by Harlan Coben.  I liked it, but that may be in part because I saw it on the big screen in New York.  Theatres here rarely show any foreign films with English subtitles, so I always try to seek them out when I go to the big city.

Has Girl with the Dragon Tattoo made it to the States, yet?  I was so surprised when I found a trailer of it and it had subtitles (most of them don't).  But they were in Swedish.  PatW said her grandkids got a DVD of it from cousins in Sweden and it had English subtitles.

There will be some more changes in the heading -- look for a few new links.

I'm in the market for a new DVD player, and boy, have I learned a lot by checking out reviews, etc.  My old one takes 2 minutes to show up on screen, saying "bad disc" and then another 2 minutes to load and start working. And if you stop for more than 15 minutes it won't pick up where you left off.   I was half considering Blu-Ray, but they're still working on the technology and you have to update them with "firmware" every so often from you computer. And that seemed to cause problems for a lot of folks.  Is it just because the age clock is ticking or are things getting more complicated?  Am going to stick with plain old stick-it-in-and-watch for now.

MaryZ, you really have a gem with your  Phillips DVR player/recorder with hard drive, etc.  Nobody is making that sort of thing anymore, and if you can find the Phillips, it's price has more than tripled what it used to sell for. I hope my ancient VCR lasts because it would totally gall me to have to pay a monthly fee just to tape a program or two.

Remember -- there's another new Inspector Lewis coming on tonight on my PBS channels.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 12, 2009, 09:22:59 AM
 My PBS station had two Inspector Lewis films on last night, probably because
they are playing catch-up.  I watched the first last night and will watch the second today.  I am still having so much fun with the little one-liner zingers
between Lewis and Hathaway.  If you're not paying attention you'll miss them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 13, 2009, 05:09:54 PM
I just saw the best film I've seen all year!  My son took me yesterday to
Los Angeles to see a new film, A SERIOUS MAN, a comedy/drama -- Wonderful!   But no wonder, since it's a Coen Brothers film.  It will make you laugh and wince at the same time at all the things that happen to this poor man, and will leave you thinking for quite a while.  The cast, altho' not well known, should all get awards.  Don't miss it!

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on October 13, 2009, 07:34:52 PM
Thanks, Marjifay, I'm a Coen Brothers fan so I'll be sure this one is on my list.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 14, 2009, 09:11:24 AM
  I must confess I never pay much attention to who produces and directs the
films I watch. I'm just there to enjoy the story.  Reading the posts from MARJ
& JACKIE,  I decided to go check out the Coen Brothers. 
  Well, what do you know! I found some of my favorite movies in their list.
I really so need to start paying more attention.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 15, 2009, 10:38:39 AM
You’re one smart lady, Babi.  Like you, I’ve paid little attention to directors and producers.  Maybe it’s about time.  Anyway, here’s a listing of their films, and a link to more about them.

Coen Brothers Films


A Serious Man (2009)
No Country for Old Men (2007)
Paris , je t'aime(2007)
The Ladykillers (2004)
Intolerable Cruelty (2003)
The Man Who Wasn't There(2001)
O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000)
The Big Lebowski (1998)
Fargo (1996)
The Hudsucker Proxy (1994)
Barton Fink (1991)
Miller's Crossing (1990)
Raising Arizona (1987)
Blood Simple (1985)


Coen Brothers (http://worldfilm.about.com/od/thecoenbrothers/p/thecoenbrothers.htm)

A Serious Man sounds like a good one.  I'm going to put it on my Netflix list.

Take a look above -- thanks to PatW the heading has changed.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 15, 2009, 08:43:06 PM
Pedln, the reviews of "A Serious Man" make it sound like a good bet.  The only 2 Coen brothers films I've actually seen are "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" (the Odyssey retold) and "Fargo", both stellar.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 16, 2009, 08:16:21 AM
Pat, I've seen those two, plus "No Country for Old Men".  I now have a healthy respect for the
Coen Bros.  I want to add "Serious Man" to my queue also.  Maybe "The Man Who Wasn't There", also; that sounds intriguing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on October 16, 2009, 08:42:23 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)



Oh goody, can we rate these movies?  
Coen Brothers movies are mixed, for me.

No Country for Old Men (2007)           not bad, good acting, weird plot

O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000)     one of the best,  laugh riot!

Fargo (1996)                                     The Best.  Seen again, still good!

Barton Fink (1991)                             awful, don't waste your time
     that was a surprise because I almost always like John Turratino

I hope the new one is up there with the best ... do tell ...
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 17, 2009, 08:31:21 AM
 I watched "Brother, Where Art Thou" twice.  I never thought of myself as a
country music fan, but I really liked the music they used in the movie. The scene
where a large group of people were walking down to the river to be baptized,
singing as a choral group, was truly magical.
  'Fargo' was such a departure from the usual country sheriff genre it bordered
on genius. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on October 17, 2009, 09:34:48 AM
Nobody has mentioned Raising Arizona.  There are parts in that movie where I laughed til I hurt.  Some of it isn't funny but on the whole it is a riot.  Fargo, same. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 18, 2009, 09:33:31 AM
 The title "Raising Arizona" is very familiar, but I honestly can't remember
whether I saw it or not.  I may have just seen some of the ads.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on October 18, 2009, 12:17:39 PM
Just finished watching latest version of The 39 Steps which was screened locally tonight. Enjoyed it thoroughly - it kept the pace up - though there really wasn't any tension throughout. Wasn't much like I remember from earlier versions. Why do they tamper with the storylines all the time - Penry-Jones is certainly not going to oust Robert Donat or Kenneth More as my favourite Hannay but he was OK.

Also, last night we watched  a DVD of the classic Casablanca - it never changes  - these days I'm not sure whether the cast and crew were playing it seriously or not . Claude Raines was surely playing for laughs. So many one liners from them all - I'd forgotten what a great actor Paul Henreid was -   
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 18, 2009, 10:16:53 PM
Gumtree, I don't know the latest version of 39 steps,but the original version with Robert Donat was already a total tampering with the book (which is actually a rather slight plot).  As you probably remember from Author Author, I am a fan of John Buchan--I'm not quite sure why--he's pretty corny and his politics and world view aren't mine, but he's good at telling a tale and catching you up in what he feels, and I've read pretty much all he's written with pleasure.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on October 18, 2009, 10:32:50 PM
PatH Yes, I know - very corny at times. I guess that the Robert Donat version is something of a classic and has become the yardstick we measure others by - and of course, Donat had Hitchcock at the helm. I know it's been a long time and perhaps my memory is not what it was - but I don't recall a suffragette alongside Donat  ???
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 18, 2009, 10:49:45 PM
Gumtree, I don't recall a suffragette anywhere.  Buchan has some powerful women--the villainess in "Greenmantle", and the woman Hannay marries after "Mr. Standfast", but they all fit into the pattern of "powerful in their way, but the world is still run by men's rules".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 19, 2009, 08:32:46 AM
  You thought so, too, PatH?  I remember reading the '39 Steps', and being
disappointed in it. I thought it was supposed to be really good, but
maybe I just got that impression because of the movie publicity. I don't
remember actually seeing the movie, either.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 24, 2009, 10:59:00 PM
It seems to me that I've heard of 39 steps since forever, but have never seen nor read it.  For some reason I thought it was a religious story, but from the way a few of described it, it sounds like a thriller.  Guess I'll have to read it and find out.

I've had The Station Agent here from Netflix since mid-September.  Just never felt in the mood.  But I finally got a decent DVD player hooked up, so last night was the trial run.  It was great, I loved it -- about a dwarf (played by Peter Dinklage) who loves trains. More than people. It was very much a film about the ways we shut people out, as well as how we open doors.  Thomas McCarthy was the director, and I believe also wrote the screenplay.  The film itself has received a variety of awards.

Has anyone seen Amelia?  The NYT reviewer really panned it, but other than that I know nothing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on October 24, 2009, 11:41:13 PM
Richard Gere and Hilary Swank are not my dream couple.  I'll pass.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 25, 2009, 12:30:18 AM
Pedln, 39 Steps is a pre-WWI spy thriller.  Although I'm a fan of the author, this book is rather slight, though it reads along OK.  I don't care much for the movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on October 25, 2009, 09:17:51 AM
No I'm going to pass on the Swank/ Gere thing too.  I hear a lot of people are planning the same, shame really, I guess.

_________________________

I'm still on a Valentino kick and yesterday thought it might be nice to read a book about him, so I went to Amazon and yes, there's one with interviews, etc., but I thought that looks like a coffee table book, I don't' need one that big, and looked at the price in passing.  And looked at the price?  And stared at the price! GUESS what the price of that book was?

Don't look it up, guess?

Slick glossy looking  book, guess at the price?

Perhaps we should give a prize to the person who comes closest? I would say without going over,  but there's no fear of that.

_________________________

So I won't be reading about him.

I first saw O Brother Where Art Thou in a class on the Odyssey, believe it or not and was immediately hooked on the music and the cleverness of it. A local musician was also in it.  I got the sound track and still play it in the car, fabulous thing.

_________________________

Has anybody seen September Issue? It came here but left before I could get to see it, another documentary, this time on Anna Wintour, would love to see it, but maybe it will come out on DVD, I'm beginning to enjoy that experience more than the movie theater.

You can stop the action or fast forward it and see something as many times as you like, a different kind of experience.  Which do you prefer, really? The theater or the DVD? I like the little players, mine has a 9 inch screen (do they make bigger ones? ) and sits in the lap, for all but a few movies it's perfect.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 25, 2009, 01:14:32 PM
I wouldn't buy that book.  You don't even get FREE SHIPPING!!    ;D

But now I know Valentino's last name.

I love seeing movies on a big screen, but the DVDs offer so many more choices, in additon to providing subtitles and/or captions. And it's a great way to watch some of those TV shows that were missed in previous years.  Right now I"m working my way through Desperate Housewives and Boston Legal.  Up until last week I really didn't know who people were talking about when they'd mention Jon and Kate -- plus 8.  Reality TV. And Netflix has their first two seasons available, but I doubt I'll put them in my queue at #169.

But isn't it amazing how much is now available to us, in so many different ways, all because of technology.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on October 25, 2009, 01:39:40 PM
DVDs by a mile.  The other features mentioned plus the biggie IMHO is the commentary.  watching Waiting for Guffman on DVD and then listening to the commentary by Christopher Guest and Eugene Levy, the movie became memorable in a new way.  Love the extras on DVDs.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 26, 2009, 12:08:05 AM
Pedln said: But isn't it amazing how much is now available to us, in so many different ways, all because of technology.

I love the way you can get repeats on the internet of programs you missed via UTube, et al.   And I've found old television programs, like Jack Benny and other really old ones on UTube.  And now CSpan's BookTV website is set up so you can watch programs you've missed.
Wonderful!

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on October 28, 2009, 01:05:27 PM
Somehow I missed Marley and Me.  When I saw the movie recently I loved it.  How do the book and movie compare?  The author has a new book out http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/g/john-grogan/longest-trip-home.htm by John Grogan.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 29, 2009, 08:07:21 AM
  I wonder if I have C-Spans Book TV?  I'll have to go check my listings.
I'd like to know what that's about.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on October 29, 2009, 09:27:16 AM
Babi, in our system, BookTV is on CSpan-2, generally only on weekends.  Look online at booktv.org for the schedule.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 30, 2009, 08:06:48 AM
 Thanks, MARYZ.  I do have C-Span 2; I'll check the schedule for this
weekend.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on November 01, 2009, 10:48:16 PM

 :-*
Joy
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: fairanna on November 17, 2009, 02:59:21 AM
Since we had a week of RAIN AND WIND ETC from the nor'easter aided and abetted via hurricane Ida ...I had to go out one day for some dr tests and thank goodness I had a warm jacket with a hood and longer length, The wind pushed  rain sideways and it hurt to have it hit a bare spot,,anyway I had time (although I did lose power one evening ) to read a book from front to back Has anyone read The Time Traveler's Wife? I understand it is or will be coming out  soon and is called a MAJOR MOTION PICTURE...

I wish I had a concise opinion but I kept changing my mind about how I viewed it ..There were parts I loved and other ones I just wasnt sure what the author was thinking ..BUT I want to see the movie because I have to know how they DID it! I would love to hear what those who read it has to say..anyone?  annafair
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 17, 2009, 08:36:58 AM
 Hi, ANNA.  I've been seeing quite a bit of ads and talk about "The Time
Traveler's Wife".  I'm not sure if I want to read the book/see the movie
or not.  What little I know about it leaves me ambivalent. 
  When you see the movie, let me know what you think of it.  I'll probably need a strong recommendation from people with tastes similar
to mine before I tackle the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: fairanna on November 17, 2009, 08:46:10 AM
It is a clever book but ......I can tell when a book captures me ...I dont peek at the ending to make sure it would be worth my time ....I peeked but still felt hmmmm which is why I am anxious to hear what other readers think,,,,I have some other new books to read but time seems to be moving FAST  hugs to all
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 17, 2009, 09:08:15 AM
 Oh, my, doesn't it!!  It seems I've hardly turned around each year before it's holiday season again.  What happened to those endless days of childhood, when the next event took forever to get here?
 Oh, I know. Then, I was just waiting for it. Now, I've got to get ready for them....all of them!
   
  I guess I'll wait and see the movie. What I've heard about the book
makes me suspect it would only irritate me.   :-\
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 17, 2009, 09:47:27 AM
Anna, how nice to see you here.  Like Babi, I've heard about the Time-travellers Wife, but have never put it on my To Read list.  Perhaps the movie, when it comes out on DVD, but I've never really been drawn to books about the strange or impossible.  However, your comments sent me looking for more, and Audrey Niffenegger, the author sounds most interesting.  T-T W was her first novel, her second has either recently been published or is due out soon.  But she is also an artist and will exhibit sometime this coming year in her hometown of Chicago.  She's also created a visual series, The Night Bookmobile, for the UK's Guardian, and it will be published in book form next year.  Here's her website   Audrey Niffenegger (http://audreyniffenegger.com/)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on November 17, 2009, 12:20:16 PM
My ftf book club read The Time Traveler's Wife last year.  It got mixed reviews from the group.  I did not care for it much.  My SIL really loved it and she and I usually agree; so maybe it was the mood I was in.  I'll probably wait to see the movie until it comes to TV.
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: fairanna on November 17, 2009, 12:32:31 PM
Pedlin thanks for the link and after viewing her paintings the book I read is more understandable.....I know over the years I have written short stories and one was published in a works by the seniornet writers group and another won a first place at a writers conference...all of mine are on a disk but I have never tried to do anything with them...it would seem her mind is always busy and she has done something with it...and I have to admit my mind seems to be like hers...lol  Strange ...I am glad I  followed through on the email about the books discussions ...

My life has changed considerably since my companion of 8 years passed away Easter this year...he was ill most of those years and I could have suggested he return to his daughters in Iowa,,,but taking care of him gave my life a purpose and I felt God had sent him here to give him another 8 years of life and asked me to care for him..

Now my mind has become very active and I may write some more stories ..they come to me when I am ready for bed,,,,AUGH

My two HUGE Goldens keep me busy and awake since they will bark at me to let me know they need attention .I think I prefer a human at least they speak human and it is hard to converse with dogs they dont speak human and I dont speak woof.....I am glad to be here ....and enjoy reading everyones comments ...I SEE US IN MY MIND sitting around my dining table ,,yellow pads full of ink scratches of our thoughts...tea cups empty or still full of a delicious tea, crumbs from the home made cookied I have offered      tomorrow I am baking wonderful chocolate chip cookies with pecan and walnut pieces....( I dont keep them but send them to friends from on line or neighborhood children ,,,baking cookies is a soothing way to help a day go bye and I often think of a story or a poem when I am doing so,, the aroma from the cookies and having a cup of tea with some oven warm cookies is my idea if bliss ...God Bless all  :-)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 17, 2009, 12:32:45 PM
Audrey Niffenegger's latest is "Her Fearful Symmetry".  I read it and enjoyed it much more than TTW.  It, too, is filled with oddity.  I read it right around Halloween time, and found that it fit right into that time period.  A ghost story, to simplify.  The locale is England and set near the  "cemetary" where some famous people are buried.  It made me want to visit England and see this burial ground.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 18, 2009, 08:41:15 AM
 Interesting, PEDLN.  I enjoy the strange, but have a lifted eyebrow for
the impossible. The proposition should be at least within the dim range of
possibility so I can relax and let my imagination roam.

 Okay, Niffenegger's drawings are definitely weird.  For some reason I
clicked on a pendant(?) held by a woman in one drawing and Surprise!!,
another drawing came up whose symbolism equally escapes me. A raven with a crown, a leash around it's neck held by a skeleton smaller than the raven.
Does anybody have a clue?  FAIRANNA?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on November 18, 2009, 09:47:37 AM
Babi regarding your description of a drawing in Niffenegger's book: Could the raven with a crown reference the British crown? Remember they keep ravens at the Tower of London, wings clipped so they can't fly away. The myth is that if they fly away England will fall. That may explain the leash. Is it possible that the skeleton represents the Empire a mere skeleton of what it once was? Well, that is my interpretation without seeing it or reading the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 18, 2009, 10:49:19 PM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/foodsbooks/christmasdivider9.jpg)
You are invited to a

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=978.0)  for Book and Food Lovers

December 1 - 20

Guests will be YOU and  authors of your favorite books that combine a good story with good tips on food.  Do drop in and tell us about your favorite foodies, real and otherwise, be it Rachel Ray or Kate Jacobs or Tyler Florence or Joanne Harris.  Who's your favorite cook?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 19, 2009, 08:04:30 AM
A very imaginative interpretation, FRYBABE. Who knows?  I found it by
accident, clicking on an object in another drawing. I had no idea there
was anything there, nor do I know why I had an impulse to click. The mind can do very strange things.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on November 19, 2009, 12:22:34 PM
Babi, maybe there were subliminal clues in the painting urging you to click.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 20, 2009, 08:03:06 AM
Hmm, interesting thought, PAT.  It was a medallion or pendant, being
dangled by a woman sort of hanging in air. Perhaps that made me
curious, but who would have thought to click on something inside a
painting?
  I'm wondering now if perhaps other paintings I've viewed on-line could
have been seen in more detail by clicking inside the picture.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 27, 2009, 03:32:32 PM
Brace yourselves.  This weekend's Wall Street Personal Journal calls it the time for Serious Movies for Grownups, that period at the end of the year when studios release the last of their Oscar ( and other award) hopefuls.  And this year's selection sounds good.

Up in The Air starring George Clooney, due for release Dec. 4, loosely based on a novel of the same name by Walter Kirn.  About a guy who goes from city to city firing people.  That's his job.  But when the economy tanked, the director had to make changes, including having real people who were really fired, incorporated into the script.

The Lovely Bones, based on Alice Sebold's novel, long-awaited, is due out Dec. 11.

And also on Dec. 4, The Last Station, about Tolstoy's final days, starring Helen Mirren and Christopher Plummer. That sounds like a lineup hard to beat.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on November 27, 2009, 04:27:07 PM
We have Cormac McCarthy's The Road, as well.  We discussed this on SeniorNet.  http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/film-reviews/the-road-film-review-1004009191.story
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 27, 2009, 09:17:23 PM
That's right, Jackie, though I think I will pass on that one for a while.  I know both book and film have received a lot of attention, but post-apocalypse dramas are not my cup of tea.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on November 30, 2009, 08:27:18 PM
I just read that! Isn't it amazing how much older Helen Mirren looks in that get up than she does normally?

At any rate that looks good. I came in to say that I have finally viewed Outsourced, recommended here, it's cute. I enjoyed it, thanks for the recommendation.

One not mentioned here (yet) is Berkeley Square, I think it is, about 4 nannies in  England, in 1902.  I saw it for sale in one of the PBS catalogs and thought I'd rent it from Netflix and loved it. Very much like Upstairs Downstairs if the first two are anything to go by (there are 10).

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on November 30, 2009, 09:47:05 PM
(http://www.christmasgifts.com/clipart/christmasholly7.jpg)
We're looking forward to seeing you at the

Holiday Open House (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?board=76.0)


December 1 - 20


Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 04, 2009, 11:24:08 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)




Tonight we watched the old David Lean film A Passage to India and found it to be absolutely absorbing. Alec Guiness and Dame Peggy Ashcroft were at the height of their powers, Judy Davis just beginning and Edward Fox already the consummate actor. The Indian actors Victor Bannerjee and Saeed Jaffrey are better known today. I think I'll have to read the book again !
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 04, 2009, 11:48:55 AM
Gum, I just now added Passage to India to my Netflix queue, and would you believe, moved it up to the #1 position.  I'm just in the mood for something like that.

One of these days Netflix will figure out how to put captions or subtitles on their downloaded English language films, but the mood should keep for a week.  Passage has just knocked Desperate Housewives down a notch.

The other night I watched Lakeview Terrace.   Not particularly memorable -- a homeowner, a cop, disapproves of his new neighbors' interacial marriage, and attempts to drive them away.  Three stars.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 04, 2009, 12:26:58 PM
Pedln: I do hope you really enjoy Passage - I did.   The No 1 spot in my queue (not Netflix - we don't have them here)  is Gran Torino which we missed at the movies - but there's still a big demand for it so I just keep waiting...

Next one for us is Girl With the Pearl Earring - maybe over the coming weekend...
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on December 04, 2009, 01:17:02 PM
(http://www.seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/kim/kimcvrsm.jpg)
Coming Soon...KIM by Kipling ~ our January Book Club Online.
Let us know you'll be joining us in our discussion (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=997.msg49658#msg49658).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 05, 2009, 08:42:19 AM
 Alec Guinness is one of the best, isn't he?   Being an old movie, tho',
I wonder, GUM, did you notice if it had closed captioning? I'd like to see
the movie, but it is so frustrating to have one arrive..yay!!...and then
discover I can't follow the story for lack of the CC.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 05, 2009, 10:37:47 AM
I'm sorry Babi I didn't notice about the closed captioning - I've already sent it back so can't check either. The movie was made in 1984. Of course, in any case the Netflix stock would be different from Aussie stock.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on December 05, 2009, 12:05:07 PM
I've never forgotten the film Passage to India.  Wonderful acting.

Turner Classics Movie channel will be showing RANDOM HAVEST soon with Greer Garson and Ronald Coleman.  Have never seen it.  The book sounds interesting too, and I've put it on my hold list at the library. 

Have been listening to the old Jack Benny radio programs on my car's XM Satellite Radio channels, and he often had Ronald Coleman as a guest.  He and Benny were wonderful and very funny together.  By the way, I'll never be without XM radio -- wonderful when you're driving throught an area where all you can get is religious and country music broadcasts!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 05, 2009, 06:45:32 PM
Babi, Passage has CC and subtitles both.  If it's on my queue, it has to have it.

I love to haunt the DVD bargain boxes, and yesterday at Sam's I found a goodie with four Turner Classic Movies, including Casablanca.  I hadn't seen it in years.  So this morning I thought I'd just check and make sure this bargain disc was of decent quality, with subtitles, etc. Well, I got so caught up in it that I watched the whole thing, marvelling at what a good film, what a great picture it was -- even in b & w, even without the special effects so common in today's movies.  The acting and staging and script can't be beat.  No wonder it's one of the top classics.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 06, 2009, 01:11:11 AM
Ah Pedln - I agree with all you say about Casablanca -we have a copy of it and watched it only a month or so ago. Brilliant - can't get over what a good actor Paul Henreid was and also how Claude Rains carried his comic part so well.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 06, 2009, 09:55:24 AM
 Thanks, GUM. Unfortunately, I find that most of the BBC films do not
have closed captioning. It's a pity, since there are so many British films
I would love to see. Over here, CC has been added to most of the old
movies that are offered.
  Oh, PEDLN says 'Passage' does have CC. Great! Thanks, P.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 19, 2009, 10:01:54 PM
This has been a banner week for movies for me.  I did watch Passage to India -- wonderful.  Glorious scenery and shots, good acting. Definitly a classic to keep.

Tonight I just finished watching Julie and Julia.  Wonderful.  Especially Meryl Streep in her role as Julia Child.  I'll be very surpised if she does not get an award for her performance.  I'd love to see her in a whole movie just about Julia Child.  Though I must say, I think the critics have been a bit harsh with Julie Powell, so many accusing her of whining, etc.  I did not feel that way, although at times I felt her appearance to be an intrusion.  But that was just because Meryl STreep was so good.

Golden Globe nominees are out.  Have you seen any of these?
Golden Globe nominees (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2009/12/15/movies/awardsseason/1215-GG_index.html)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 20, 2009, 08:40:47 AM
 Oh, my. Now I've got a list of movies to enter on my Netflix queue.
I've got books to finish.  I've got presents to wrap. I must go grocery
shopping.  Thank God today at least is clear and sunny!  Where are my
track shoes?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on December 20, 2009, 09:13:54 AM
It's clear and sunny here too, but we got almost 2 feet of snow yesterday and the residential streets aren't plowed yet.  Track shoes will be useless.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on December 21, 2009, 09:49:26 AM
I want to see Meryl Streep in It's Complicated, the new movie with Alec Baldwin and Steve Martin as well as Mary Kay Place who I loved in the 1970s TV series, Mary Hartman--Mary Hartman.  Meryl Streep said she was surprised to still be working at age 60, but I'm not as she's such a wonderful actress.  I really get tired of seeing all those old male geezers in movies with young dippy "actresses."  Sad that there are few good roles these days for mature female actresses.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on December 21, 2009, 03:38:45 PM
I agree. But the fact that there are some really good ones around inspires producers to make movies for them.

My one complaint about Meryl Streep was that she was always suffering in all her movies. A new one would come out and I'd think "I know it will be great, but can I stand to see her suffer again?"

I'm so glad she has gotten away from that. I LOVED her in that ABBA musical (Mama Mia?)!! And I can't wait to see her as Julia child.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 22, 2009, 08:12:53 AM
 I agree, JOANK.  I've enjoyed seeing Meryl Streep in the movies she
has been doing lately.  Much more fun!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ginny on December 27, 2009, 07:21:49 PM
Wow I am so glad to see those Golden Globe nominees, I just saw Up in the Air yesterday along with It's Complicated, which I thought was OK, funny, fun, etc, but Up in the Air I  thought was really something, I'm glad to see it leading the pack.

Also I see Grey Gardens nominated as Best Mini Series,  with Drew Barrymore AND Jessica Lang as the Beales both nominated for acting.

It's also fun to see Meryl Streep nominated twice against herself, that should surely shorten the odds. :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 28, 2009, 10:26:38 AM
Tonight I watched the Al Pacino film 'Looking for Richard' Hadn't seen it since it was showing in the movies and have been wanting to see it again specially since we read and discussed Richard III with Deems et al. I was not disappointed - brilliant. Many of the topics we discussed were raised in Pacino's film and made it seem like it was only yesterday that we were talking about and trying to nut out those self same issues.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on December 28, 2009, 01:47:30 PM
In surfing my premium channels, I ran across the subject movie and gave it a try.  It certainly doesn't rate among the best I've ever viewed but it is interesting by virtue of an unusual quality that, frankly, didn't occur to me until the latter portion of the film.  It stars Patrick Stewart and Kate Winslet.  I would love to hear what others have to say about it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on December 28, 2009, 01:58:46 PM
This movie, while not an award winning film, is a "must see", particularly for those who enjoy Anthony Hopkins.  Don't let the title mislead you as it did me.  It's all about a geezer achieving his dream.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on December 28, 2009, 04:56:30 PM
I saw "The Fastest Indian" and enjoyed it a lot. The extra about the making of the movie was fun, too- all the small parts were acted by people in this small New Zealand town.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on December 28, 2009, 06:28:02 PM
Loved Fastest Indian.  It truly is a feel good movie about a dream and the life it inspires.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on December 28, 2009, 08:38:58 PM
JimNT--I watched "The Fastest Indian" a couple of years ago.  I loved it.  Anthony Hopkins is worth watching in anything, but I loved the sense of whimsey in this movie.  I tried to watch "Little Children", but couldn't get into it.  Maybe it was the mood I was in, but I did not finish it.
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on December 30, 2009, 10:14:50 AM
Sally:  Like the title, Little Children is a film about immature adults.  As one of many examples, the Prom King agrees to meet his lover (Kate Winslet) but is distracted by his love for skateboarding.  The entire movie centers around immature acts.  Hilarious but also thoughtful.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 30, 2009, 11:29:01 PM
Welcome JimNT.  I'm glad you and so many others recommend
the World's  Fastest Indian, with Anthony Hopkins.  Ihope no one is waiting for it from Netflix.  I've had it almost a month, but have not had a chance to see it, what with the holidays and travel and all.

I'll probably wait a bit on Little Children, but definitely want to see It's
Complicated.  Those of you who have seen both the recent Streep films, which one do you think is the best?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 31, 2009, 09:04:16 AM
 Actually, I had a very mixed reaction to "Mama Mia".  Much as I enjoy
Meryl Streep, the musical didn't work for me.  I used to like them when
they were so popular back in the 40's and 50's.  But now this one seemed so contrived and, of course, wholly unreal.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on December 31, 2009, 01:33:09 PM
Babi:  My sentiments exactly.  Since ABBA as a group was contrived, like the Monkees, and did not grow out of the association of the performers, it has lost much of its sparkle for me.  When one thinks of the emotional intensity  of musicals like Les Miz, Rent, Phantom, Chorus Line, etc, Mama Mia seems pretty feeble to me.  Curious about Streep;  my daughter can't stand her.  She is not someone whose preformances I seek out, but I've always enjoyed watching her. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 02, 2010, 09:05:13 AM
  Streep is simply an excellent actress.  Her movies are not always ones
that I particularly enjoy seeing, but I know her own performance will be
'spot on'.   I never watched "Sophie's Choice", for instance, despite the
rave reviews, simply because what I had heard about the story sounded
depressing to me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 02, 2010, 10:23:42 PM
I just finished watching World's Fastest Indian, and I certainly agree with Jim -- it's a "must-see."  It's definitely a "feel-good" show, but there is so much going on that it is not sappy, just very engrossing.  Was Anthony Hopkins nominated for anythng for that film?  I didn't realize it was based on real events.  Towards the end of the film I kept thinking that one character looked quite familiar.  Well, of course, it was Christopher Lawford (playing the part of Jim), and he looks much like his father, Peter.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 03, 2010, 01:07:44 PM
Pedlin:  Thanks for clueing me in re Christopher Lawford.  I missed that entirely though I'm sure he was listed in the credits.  In fact, I didn't know that Peter has a son in films.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on January 03, 2010, 06:29:36 PM
See here:  http://www.imdb.com/media/rm865508608/nm0492441
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 04, 2010, 09:49:12 AM
My son and I are going to see Avatar today.  Has anyone seen it (or plan to see it, LOL)  We are curious because there's been so much interesting hype about it.  We're driving to a town near here (Camarillo, CA) that has a great Mexican restaurant.  So if we walk out on the movie, all will not be lost.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 04, 2010, 09:59:55 AM
Marjifay, I haven't seen the movie but my sister has as well as several of my co-workers. They all say it is great. Apparently you can watch it with or without the 3-D glasses.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 04, 2010, 10:57:08 AM
Thanks, Frybabe.  Good to know that someone liked it that much.  I'd heard that you didn't need 3d glasses (as back in the 1950s 60s.) We're going to see it at their IMAX theater.  Will post my comments on it later.

Marge
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on January 04, 2010, 02:24:49 PM


On HBO this weekend, I watched "The Soloist" with Jamie Foxx, which is a true story based on a book by the...journalist portrayed in the movie by Robert Downey, Jr.  (can't remember his name - Steve Lang, maybe?).   Anyway - it's about a reporter from the L. A. Times who becomes involved with a schizophrenic street musician.  Although I don't care to read the book (too intense a story), the movie was very good.

Right after that, on PBS, I watched the classic Bette Davis movie "Now Voyager".  Don't think I'd ever seen it straight through from start to finish.  "Soapy" but a good antidote to "Soloist".  

Babi, the absolute lack of intensity and reality is why I am such a fan of musicals - both old and new.  I don't care to be "tied in knots" after I've seen ones like Les Miz and The Phantom - although I did like Chorus Line.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 04, 2010, 04:39:44 PM
How could you possibly be "tied in knots" after The Phantom?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 04, 2010, 05:47:36 PM
Steve Lopez is the journalist in The Solist.  I read the book and saw the movie and enjoyed them both.  Robert Downey Jr. is one of my favorites as is Jamie Foxx and the movie is remarkedly close to the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 04, 2010, 05:53:55 PM
I saw the Phantom some years ago at the National Theater in Washington, D. C.  Great show, but I, too, wonder why you were "tied in knots."  I suppose that each of us are affected differently.  I knew a girl that cried throughout commencement exercises.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on January 04, 2010, 06:18:12 PM
Perhaps "tied in knots" wasn't the best description I could have used.  That's as close as I can come to explaining the inner feeling I get from a movie or stage production in which the main theme is tragic and portrayed in a very dramatic fashion.  I leave the theater feeling very tense.  "Miss Saigon" is another one that affected me that way.

Jim,  I've been known to shed a tear at similar events.
After having taken her to see "The Nutcracker" since she was 2, I could barely see through the tears as my beloved 12-year-old granddaughter danced in it for the first time, even though it was a dance studio production and she was just a blossom in Waltz of the Flowers. After four years in various roles, she now dances The Dewdrop Fairy role and I only get a little misty-eyed.  :)

Just noticed your post about "The Soloist" as I was posting.  I almost had the journalist's name right!!  I thought Jamie Foxx did a fantastic job with his role.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on January 04, 2010, 06:26:54 PM
Thanks for the update about "The Soloist".  I heard an  interview with the author on NPR and Robert Downey, Jr, and Jamie Foxx are always worth watching.  It will be recorded tomorrow.  there's a companion pice, "The Making of the Soloist" coming on Wednesday on HBO AM so it's being recorded too.  I always enjoy those "Making of . . ." programs.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 05, 2010, 02:29:46 AM

(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)



I've had THE SOLOIST on my TB seen movies list-- thanks for reminding me!  Sounds good, doesn't it.

I OD'd on movie videos over the Christmas holidays.  My favorite rental store in North Hollywood closes down for two weeks, so we could have them at the same price for that lenghth of time.

The first was BRIEF ENCOUNTER (1948) with Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson, from a Noel Coward play, "Still Life."  About two people (both married, but not to each other, of course) who accidently meet and fall in love.  I'd seen these two actors in STAYING ON (1980), a sequel to Jewel in the Crown, in a very non-loving relationship, and wanted to see them in a loving relationship.  Interesting contrast.  Great acting.


Then I watched THESE THREE (1936) starring Miriam Hopkins, Merle Oberon, and Joel McCrea (with interesting bit parts by Margaret Hamilton and Walter Brennan).  Also watch the remake of this titled THE CHILDREN'S HOUR (1962), with Shirley MacLaine, Audrey Hepburn and James Garner.  Both directed by Willim Wyler from a Lillian Hellman.play.  About how a  vindictive bratty little girl's lies destroyed three lives.  I'd seen The Children's Hour before, but just found out about the previous film.  Excellent acting in both.  Interesting to see how the story changes after 26 years, from a lie about a love triangle to a lie about an "unnatural" relationship between the two women.  Miaiam Hopkins plays a young woman in the first film, then an older meddling aunt in the second.  She's great in both parts.

Marj  
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 05, 2010, 08:29:58 AM
I saw an old Jimmy Stewart movie the other day,.."The Man From Laramie".  Still really good.  Jimmy Stewart is one who seems to remain
enjoyable no matter how old the movie is.  Can you think of anyone
today who seems to fill the kind of place he did?   I can't.  Remarkable
man.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 05, 2010, 09:47:01 AM
My favorite Jimmy Stewart movie isn't one of his westerns, it's Bell, Book and Candle.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 05, 2010, 01:42:25 PM
I have several friends who adore old movies.  With some few exceptions, like The African Queen and Gone With the Wind, I simply can't develop an interest in them.  I've heard from several sources that the 1941 movie starring Orson Wells and based on the newspaper giant, William Randolph Hearst, is considered by many to be the best movie ever made.  I've watched it at least twice and clearly remember the last word uttered as "rosebud" but I can't for my life remeber the title.  In any event, I didn't find anything remarkable about the movie and have thus concluded that I'm devoid of any artistic taste.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 05, 2010, 02:56:47 PM
JimN, was it Citizen Kane? I never watched it the whole way through. Orson Welles is my favorite Mr. Rochester of all the incarnations of Jane Eyre.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 05, 2010, 06:20:56 PM
Thank you.  I can sleep well tonight.  Orson was a heavyweight in every sense.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 05, 2010, 07:03:59 PM
I've seen Citizen Kane a couple of times, but it's not one of my favorites.  I'll have to get the Jane Eyre film in which he is Mr. Rochester.  Haven't seen that one.

My son and I are addicted to old film noir films.  Love some of the lines, such as, from "Cry Danger,":

     "Do you always drink in the morning?"

     "Listen, If you drink as much as I do, you have to start early!"

Or, from the Raymond Chandler film, "The Big Sleep," where Philip Marlow (Humphrey Bogart) says,

     "He's so tough, he'd knock your teeth in and then kick you in the 
      stomach for mumbling!"

Marj

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 06, 2010, 08:38:36 AM
There are many of the old movies that are seriously dated and seem rather silly now. I can't say I 'adore' them all, JIM, but some are 'classic' in the sense that the acting and the production pass the test of time.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 06, 2010, 11:10:44 AM
Maybe I should give old movies another try.  I have found, as I'm sure you have, that movies deserve as much attention as books.  I seem to be watching movies now more than once and seeing certain attributes I hadn't seen before.  The settings for old movies have been a distraction to me because they are usually so unrealistic, but maybe I should consentrate on the plot, the lines, and the acting. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on January 06, 2010, 01:47:55 PM
Since the advent of color we have become jaded, I believe.  Watching an old B&W movie I am struck by the detail the film reveals.  An old Sherlock Holmes had one scene where there were several men with hats and overcoats.  I noticed that each coat was distinctively patterned so that it was easy for the eye to differentiate between them.  Opened my eyes to the importance of scenery design, costume design, lighting and camera work in a different way than in color.  Makeup would have been critical, too, for B&W.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on January 06, 2010, 09:22:52 PM
" I have found, as I'm sure you have, that movies deserve as much attention as books." That's a very good point. It takes less concentration to watch a movie -- it flows by us whether we are paying attention or not. And with the wide availibility of movies on TV, we tend to undervalue even the good ones.

It's interesting: some old movies hold up very well and others don't. And I can't tell which will hold up.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 07, 2010, 07:40:16 AM
JoanK  I agree that old and new movies can be and or often merely forms of relaxation; that we might sit through one without the least bit interest and forget about it immediately.  I think that in watching movies we must be in the proper frame of mind to concentrate on every detail, meaningless or not, if we are to thoroughly enjoy the presentation.  The same holds true with books.  Recently, I read the Reagan Diaries and became bored with the repetiveness of activities but I was determined to finish the book.  I did, but I didn't get any satisfaction from the content because I was thinking of the next book I've been wanting to read for some time. There are, however, bad movies and books but sometimes our own human frailties obscure our ability to judge the quality.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on January 07, 2010, 09:15:55 PM
I think that in watching movies we must be in the proper frame of mind to concentrate on every detail, meaningless or not, if we are to thoroughly enjoy the presentation.
I totally agree, with most movies.  If I re-watch a movie, I often pick up a lot of details that matter and enhance.

It's interesting to see what old movies still seem good now.  In recent watching, I felt "The Third Man" is still really good, as is "The African Queen", but "Rear Window" is poor.

Marjifay, if you want a really good "Jane Eyre", rent the 1997 TV version with Ciaran Hinds as Rochester.  He does a wonderful job of showing the man's harsh, selfish nature (with redeeming appealing qualities).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on January 07, 2010, 09:42:25 PM
Thanks to those who mentioned "The Soloist" on HBO.  I really enjoyed it and the short feature, "The Making of The Solist".  Looking Steve lopez I saw he was on the staff of the San Jose Mercuey News.  I can remember reading hisz farewell column, he was leaving SJ for Philly and The Inquirewr.  Seemed to me he was travelling the wrong way but he found himslef in LA after a while.  Making had interviews with Steve and Nathaniel.  I'm glad I had the experience of watching this so, thanks again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 07, 2010, 10:28:58 PM
PatH, I think that The Third Man was the first movie I requested from Netflix when I first started subscribing. I can still hear the theme song and hope that maybe my sheet music for it is still in the piano bench. Not sure I agree with you about Rear Window, but it's been a while since I last saw it.  I've always enjoyed the Alfred Hitchcock films, but don't necessarily want to rewatch some of them.  Certainly not Psycho.

Meryl Streep is certainly amazing.  A month ago I watched this 60 year-old actress play a middle-aged Julia Child, a superb performance.  Tonight I've been watching Evening (2007) and she plays a young 24 year-old bride.

Quote
I have found, as I'm sure you have, that movies deserve as much attention as books
I agree, Jim.  They certainly are a legitimate art form.  Well, most of them, some of them, anyway.  Do you remember the "double features?"  For the price of one ticket you would see one "good" movie and then another that was referred to as a "grade B."  There would never be two blockbusters together.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on January 07, 2010, 11:39:37 PM
Pedln, I know that the music is still in my piano bench (no, I can't play it, my husband bought it).  I love it.  "The Third Man" was originally a story by Graham Greene, first appearing in Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine where I read it before the movie came out.  Recently, I both reread the novella and rewatched the movie.  Both are very good, the movie better than the book.  They're different, though.  In the novella, the American Holly Martins gets the girl, at least for a while, with no long-term promises.

I also read the Cornell Woolrich story on which "Rear Window" was based when it first came out in EQMM, and in this case I think the story was better, but I haven't reread it to match rewatching the movie.

To complete the books part, I recently read C. S. Forester's "The African Queen" for the first time.  Again, similar but not the same.  The movie is really good, worth watching a number of times.  The book isn't as good, though it has some interesting seamanship not in the movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 08, 2010, 09:31:26 AM
Pedln, I looked up Cornell Woolrich on Google.  A lot of his books and stories made it into the movies. I remember listening to The Whistler when I was little. The radio show ran 13yrs.  There were a number of movies based on The Mark of the Whistler.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on January 08, 2010, 07:22:43 PM
IMDB lists over 90 titles for Woolrich.  One I remember liking at the time is "The Window" (1949).  A young boy, notoriously untruthful, sees a murder.  No one will believe him, but the murderers of course do, and are trying to get him and kill him.  the suspense is heightened by the powerlessness of a child in an adult world.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on January 08, 2010, 08:18:46 PM
PATH: I remember that story, too. We must have read it about the same time. I always liked Cornell Woolrich.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 09, 2010, 12:29:52 PM
These Ellery Queen Mystery Magazines -- are they collectors' items now?

I'd never heard of Woolrich before, but he certainly wrote a lot of books.  Our library has one -- Into the Night.  And the old Rear Window video tapes.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on January 09, 2010, 01:24:53 PM
Reading good reviews of "The Soloist" on Seniors & Friends I recorded it and it was a fascinating tale of a musical genius who was eeking out an existance on LA's skid row.  The story, based on a book by Steve Lopez, LA Times columnist, starred Jamie Foxx and Robert Downey Jr.  Nathaniel Ayers, the musician, had been a student at Julliard when schizophrenia struck.  The film presented his illness with sympathy and compassion.  Incidentally I am reading The Caveman's Valentine which is fiction but features a schizophrenic black man who lives in a cave in a NYC park.  The book:  http://www.bookreview.com/$spindb.query.listreview2.booknew.2778   and the movie:  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0182000/
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on January 09, 2010, 04:56:38 PM
These Ellery Queen Mystery Magazines -- are they collectors' items now?
Last time I checked, they were worth about $1 each, so someone wants them, but they're not valuable.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on January 09, 2010, 06:43:45 PM
In Mystery Corner, we were just talking about what I think is one of the most successful transcription of books into movies: "The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency". If you haven't seen the DVDs, I highly recommend them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 12, 2010, 09:40:47 AM
Well we got to see Avatar yesterday at the IMAX in Camarillo.  It was interesting (to a point).  But we did need 3-D glasses which were given us as part of the $11.50 ticket price.  The 3-D was great -- fantastic, in fact -- very much better than the tame 1950s 3-D.  And the scenes of the jungle and exotic animals and birds on the other planet were gorgeous.  But I'm just not that much a fan of fantasy/sci-fi books or movies, so the 2-1/2 hours seemed a bit too long.  Lots of action, more than I cared for.  But I'm glad I went - my curiosity was satisfied.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 12, 2010, 09:51:04 AM
Forgot to mention that the previews showed the next 3D movie at the IMAX will be ALICE IN WONDERLAND with (who else?) Johnniy Depp as the Mad Hatter.  We just might go see that, as it looked very good.  I just re-read the book recently for discussion in another group.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 12, 2010, 10:47:14 AM
Marj, I think the special effects would be interesting, but I'm not a sci-fi fan either, and 2 1/2 hours would be a bit long.  Especially if there were no captions, which I doubt there are.

Alice in Wonderland sounds good.  I'd like to see that.  My question would be, when the DVDs come (hopefully with captions or subtitles) can they only work on a 3D TV set or would you also get a pair of the glasses with the DVD.  Somewhere, in one of the news colums they said that if you tried to watch a 3D production without the glasses (screen or TV) it would be a blurry mess.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 12, 2010, 11:05:29 AM
No, Pedln, there were no captions except a few here and there to decipher some of the dialogue of the people on the strange planet.
As to whether you can watch a 3D movie without the glasses -- I took my glasses off towards the end of the movie as my eyes were getting tired, and after a few moments I could see it just fine without any blurriness -- just no 3D effects.  So I imagine you could see it on a regular TV screen, you just wouldn't have that effect.  But it looked like a beutiful movie, and I don't think that would matter too much.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 13, 2010, 08:36:00 AM
 Hmmm. At 2-1/2 hours, MARJ, I'm glad I've put it on my Netflix list.
It may be a long while before I get it, but I can at least break up my
viewing session into smaller chunks. 
  I hadn't heard about Johnny Depp as the Mad Hatter. He would be in his
perfect metier for that one. Another one to add to my 'send it when you
have it list' at Netflix.
  Another reason for Netflix, PEDLN.  The theatres don't use closed
captioning, but nearly all the Netflix films do. I'm glad you asked that
question about blurred vision with 3-D on the TV. And very glad to read
Marj's answer.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 13, 2010, 10:27:57 AM
Well, I just ordered seasons1 & 2 of The Waltons from Amazon -- rock bottom price for the 10 discs.  But what an ordeal to get product info from them.  (And half the stuff in my house is from Amazon.)  E-mailing is just about impossible because any response says says that it comes from a "non-responsive" site.  I wanted to know if the product had closed-captions.  Finally after almost a week I received an email (non-responsive) that the product was shrink-wrapped and I should contact Warner Theatre.  Oh sure.

Anyway, guess if they have CC or subtitles they'll certainly be a change from Desperate Housewives, which I'm received from Netflix, disc by disc.

Babi, I'll be curious to know how Avatar works on a TV, without glasses.  A woman in my bridge foursome just saw it.  Her opinion was similar to yours, Marj.  She's not into sci-fi, but liked the special effects. Thought it was pretty long.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on January 13, 2010, 12:22:39 PM
Netflix sent me "Lost in Austen" and I couldn't turn the CC off!  "Lost" is fun and I was really caught up in it until the disk got stuck.  Maybe cleaning with a damp cloth will work; if not Netflix will send me another one when I send this one back.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 13, 2010, 08:24:47 PM
Jackie, to turn off CC you go into your TV Memu settings and turn it off there.  (Or, some lucky people have a little CC button on their remote, which is a tad easier) To turn off subtitles, you do that directly to the DVD, usually with your DVD remote.  What gets confusing now, is that many of the newer DVDs don't have CC, but have SDH, which is "subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing" and that (I think) comes from the DVD, and turning CC on or off on your TV wouldn't affect it.  But, I'm not totally sure on that.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 14, 2010, 08:21:35 AM
JACKIE, there are little velvety cloths made for the purpose of wiping off
CD's. I don't know whether wiping with a damp cloth is a good idea or
not.  My daughter explained, too, that the wiping should be done gently from the center outward, not a circular motion. It's a good thing I have
her here with me.  No telling what kind of damage I would do with all
the new tech.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on January 14, 2010, 10:15:10 AM
The Netflix sleeves advise gentle washing with liquid soap or window cleaner.  This has sometimes worked for me.  I then rinse under a gentle stream of water.  Babi's right about wiping from the center out.

Once I wanted to be sure that a badly defective DVD wasn't sent out again, so I put a sma piece of masking tape over the center hole, not touching any playing surface, with a note.  I got back an email saying We believe you have tried to communicate with us, but it is not in a form that can be answered.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 14, 2010, 12:14:23 PM
PatH     ;D

Sounds like their PR is okay.  Not like some other places I know.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on January 14, 2010, 02:56:07 PM
I just got a letter from Netflix, inviting me to rejoin (I used to belong, and dropped it when I saw I wasn't using it). They offered me a service where instead of sending movies, they would stream them to my TV or computer -- any number of movies for $8.99/month.

Somehow, that doesn't appeal to me. I would feel I HAD to watch trhe movie in one sitting, but I almost always get interrupted.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 15, 2010, 08:42:08 AM
 I didn't know about the liquid soap or glass cleaner, PAT. Valerie
probably does, tho'.  I generally leave the handling of the DVD's to her.
I think she also notifies Netflix when a disc is flawed. Apparently
there is a way to do that, perhaps at their website.

I don't much like the idea of movies being 'streamed' directly to my TV
either, JoanK. But I would still watch them at my leisure. One can always
'resume' at a later time.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 15, 2010, 09:49:09 PM
Streaming or DVD -- the final product would be the same.  I think.  You could still stop in the middle of a streamed film, could you not?  I've watched a few on my laptop and somehow Netflix remembers right where you left off.  One disadvantage with streaming is that you don't have as large a selection, and for those of us who use captions, you won't find them on English language films.  One on foreign films that have English subtitles.  Netflix says they're working on this.

Streaming is no doubt the way of the future, but I'll stick with the DVDs until the entire collection is available, and the streaming can be done wirelessly without having to connect your TV to something else.  Like right now, I can sit in a chair in my living room or on my front porch and watch one of those foreign films on my battery-run laptop.  But I don't do it very often.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 17, 2010, 10:40:30 AM
I finally found a movie I saw several years ago and had confidently predicted it would win several awards. Lo and behold, I received the disc from Netfllix broken in half and must now await a replacement.  In any event, I never heard about the movie again.  So much for my ability to identify award winning movies.  I've boldly made such predictions before and cannot remember a single success.  I'm a slow learner. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 18, 2010, 08:31:09 AM
Don't give it a thought, JIM.  Critics often praise things I don't
like, and vice versa.  We all have things that appeal to us
particularly.  There are any number of books that won awards
in the past that few people today ever heard of.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on January 18, 2010, 11:27:34 AM
A new site to me is "Rotten Tomatoes", a movie review site.  They have awards each year, the Golden Tomato, with a companion award, The Moldy Tomato.  Here is the page for 2009 awards:  http://www.rottentomatoes.com/guides/rtawards/
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 19, 2010, 08:31:12 PM

(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)







An interesting site, Jackie.  I need to explore it more. I’ve come across it when looking for individual reviews on Google, but never really understood how it worked.  Wikipedia explained the categories – Certified Fresh (more than 75% positive reviews), Fresh (more than 60% positive), and Rotten (less than 60% positive reviews.)

Quote
Another study by USA Today in 2003, unrelated to Rotten Tomatoes, also produced similar results: "the better the reviews, the higher the box office". The newspaper found that, contrary to popular belief, film critics and moviegoers agree more often than not.[9]
    fromn Wikipedia.

Guess I should have checked there before requesting Mr. and Mrs. Smith (A. Jolie, B. Pitt) from Netflix.  Couldn’t get through half of it.  Just plain boring.  2 stars.  And Paraiso Travel didn’t fare much better, although I did watch it all.  Columbian film.  Three stars, which is okay.  Maybe it was mood, but I just didn’t care about the characters.

On the other hand, last night I just loved the final of Return to Cranford, and wish there was more.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on January 22, 2010, 06:29:08 PM
Among my favorite authors is Cormac McCarthy.  I found The Road to be outstanding and was looking forward to the release of the movie.  It must be good because it didn't stay in the theaters very long.  I have it earmarked in Netflix so as to get it as soon as it's available.  If anybody has seen it I'd love to hear their take.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 23, 2010, 08:51:35 AM
 It was a great book, JIM, but I'm not sure I want to see the movie. Some of the scenes were so grim to read, they are bound to be even more so to watch. That may be why it didn't stay very long in the theaters.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 23, 2010, 10:26:56 AM
Usually when a movie does not stay in theatres very long, is because it's not making money, (no one going to see it).  I think word of mouth sank this movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on January 23, 2010, 12:22:43 PM
Jim:  I'm a McCarthy fan also.  His west is a grim place but his characters shine through the grit and grime, don't they?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 01, 2010, 11:31:45 AM
Last night I watched  On the Waterfront with Marlon Brando and Eva Marie Saint.  I really don't know if I ever saw if before or not, or had just heard a lot about it.  But why is it considered a great film?  I won't fault the acting, and I applaud the lack of profanity.  For me, there wasn't that much of a plot.  I compare it to another film, Casablanca, and for me there is no comparison.  Casablanca is a great film and I'll watch it again.  Waterfront, I won't say it was boring, but I doubt I'll watch it again.

What are your thoughts on some of these former greats?  What makes a film lasting?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on February 01, 2010, 08:33:38 PM
Wasn't The Magic of Ordinary Days a book? Hallmark did a nice job presenting it on tv - was it on Sunday? ................jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 01, 2010, 11:13:26 PM
I'm sorry I missed that, Jean.  It sounds like a good one.  Yes, it is a book by Ann Howard Creel,  who is primarily a YA author.  This is her first adult novel.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 07, 2010, 09:50:42 AM
I'm just beginning to catch up the posts after several weeks absence and enjoyed reading the discussion. Can't respond to all I would like to but there are a couple I just can't resist...

JimNT: I agree totally with you about Citizen Kane. I really can't see what the fuss was about. Maybe it was because Welles targetted a major public figure and perhaps showed him in an unsympathetic light.
I feel the same about The Third Man - it just didn't appeal to me at all - and I should say that I loved Joseph Cotton who starred alongside Welles in that one.

The Soloist and Brief Encounter are both on my rental Q - (we don't  have Netflix here in the land 'downunder'but something similar).

PatH - Ciaran Hinds as Rochester gets my vote too - IMO he is always superb - He made a wonderful Henshard sp? in The Mayor of Casterbridge and was great as a villain in Veronica Geurin. As for the part of Captain Frederick Wentworth in Persuasion - he was made for it. You could say I'm biassed but he is  such a good actor that his performances stay with you - well, with me anyway.  ;D


I really came in just to say I watched Capote last night. Such a brilliant film - Phillip Seymour Hoffman does it again but I found the speech mannerisms difficult at times.
I first noticed him as an actor in Cold Mountain - he was so believable that I hated him.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 08, 2010, 07:14:41 PM
Gumtree, I agree with everything you say about Ciaran Hinds, especially about his performance as Henchard.  He totally makes you see what that dark, partly unsympathetic character is about.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on February 09, 2010, 12:01:09 PM
Hesitantly started the John Adams series provided thru Netflix.  I was pleasently awarded a well acted, informative film of the early republic.  It was produced by Tom Hanks, et al, and stars Paul Giamatti.  I think there are several discs in the series and I'm awaiting number 2.  I highly recommend this little known (at least to me) series.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 09, 2010, 12:16:56 PM
Yes, Jim, Giamatti does a fine job, and also Laura Linney as Abigail.  I borrowed the set from a friend and did not have time to finish it, but want to go back to it.

Right now I'm watching Possession, based on A.S. Byatt's book, but I think I"m not taking it all in.  Perhaps it's the frequent and very short flashbacks that occur.  I'm thinking I need to read the book first, and then watch the film again, more closely.  I had it checked from the library, but then three reserve books became available before I even started.  So instead, I'm now reading Byatt's The Children's Book.

Does Byatt always write about literary matters?  Both Possession and The Children's Book seem  to be about that.

Gum, I didn't realize that P.S. Hoffman had played in so many films.  I liked him in The Savages and Charlie Wilson's WAr, as well as Capote.  Will have to go back now and watch some of the earlier ones.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on February 09, 2010, 06:25:22 PM
Jim, I watched the John Adams series when it was on HBO.  I thought it was excellent and that all the actors did a fantastic job.  I would like to watch it again.  I may have to rejoin Netflix !
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 09, 2010, 10:00:18 PM
Pedln  Seymour Hoffman played the kind of characters one doesn't really notice in a film except that he did it so well that they stay with one. I guess that finally the directors noticed how good he is too and started giving him the major roles.

I haven't read a lot of A.S Byatt but think she often uses literary allusions. I didn't care for the film of Possession which simply passes over a lot of the content (as films tend to do) there is just so much in the writing that needs to be taken in slowly and savoured.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 10, 2010, 11:24:13 PM
I gave up on the film Possession.  Maybe someday, after I read the book.  But am now watching one that came today from Netflix, The Laughing Policeman.  I don't know how it ended up on my queue or who recommended it or what, but surprise surprise, it's a police thriller starring Walter Mathau, not exactly a new production -- 1974.  I'm in the mood for some action, so will stick with this one. My favorite Mathau is Pete n Tillie, also starring CArol Burnett, but is apparently not yet available in DVD format.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 11, 2010, 02:19:48 AM
I love Walter Matthau, Pedln!  Haven't seen Laughing Policeman.  My very favorite of his is A NEW LEAF with Elaine May (1971)  So funny!

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on February 11, 2010, 05:10:35 PM
I saw an awful film last eve but with superb acting and a somewhat curious twist to a well-worn plot.  It's titled Lymelife and stars Alex Baldwin, who I roundly despise despite his excellent ability to act.  My purpose in mentioning this movie at all is simply to read your comments.
The movie is really not worth your time but, like me, maybe you were forced into viewing it, possibly at gunpoint.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on February 12, 2010, 07:33:19 AM
Shutter Island is soon to be released.  I really liked the book (Dennis LeHane) and am anxious to see the movie.  Did any of you read the book?  If so, what did you think?
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 12, 2010, 09:04:38 AM
 You'll get no comments from me, JIM. After your review, I have no
intention of spending my valuable time on that move.

 I've been seeing previews of Shutter Island, SALLY, and it looks really
weird. Didn't know there was a book.  I think I'll wait and see what
kind of comments it gets before I decide whether or not to watch it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 12, 2010, 12:30:59 PM
After having seen endless previews of Shutter Island on TV, I got the book by Lehane from my library.  I enjoyed it, but was left with a feeling of "incompleteness" somehow.  From the movie clips, I think they are going more for the scare tactics than the psychological scare!
And from reading the book, remember "all is not as it seems".  At least until you get to the ending.  And then some!  I hope the movie doesn't do the book a disservice, because it was a nifty psychological thriller.
I will probably wait until it comes to DVD, and as my husband says, "it's not my kind of movie"!  I don't mind a good scare, without the "slasher" emphasis though.  The scariest movie I have EVER seen was Hitchcock's "Psycho", only the original, none of the follow ups were even close!  Read the book, and wait until Shutter Island comes to DVD, then make your judgement, as will I.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 12, 2010, 09:39:41 PM
Tomereader,  Psycho is one movie I never ever want to see again.  I agree with you about "scariest."  I saw it back in the 60's with my visiting mother-in-law, and remember the next day when a neighbor came and said, "think about it during your next shower." 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on February 13, 2010, 07:46:20 AM
Psycho ruined showers for me for several years.  Every time I closed the shower curtain I kept feeling like someone was on the other side with a knife!!  The movie Jaws spoiled the beach for me for a short period of time.  I had trouble getting in above my knees!  I have a very active imagination.  Now that I live alone I avoid "creepy" books.  There are too many good books out there to fill my mind with more pleasant images!
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 13, 2010, 11:11:56 AM
Seeing Psycho once was enough for me. and Hitchcock's 'The  Birds' from a short story by Daphne du Maurier simply terrified me - all those sharp beaks - took me a long time to look at a kookaburra again with any affection. I've never seen Jaws - we have sharks in plenty along our coastline - they are a real and present danger to all swimmers and surfers (like me - ouch!) so I didn't fancy the film at all.

This week we watched The Hunt for Red October again after many years - was amazed at the 'presence' Sean Connery brought to his role - Sam Neill and Alec Baldwin were also pretty good as was Tim Curry from The Rocky Horror Picture Show fame.

Tonight we watched Miss Potter and loved every minute of it.
I missed it at the movies and hadn't seen it before. Great movie - Aussie director - Aussie wrote the music - need I go on?



Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 13, 2010, 11:56:48 AM
It was probably 20-25 years before I was able to watch Psycho again without losing sleep.  I couldn't sleep for a week after the first time. In fact, it probably was 20 years+ before I even watched it again! A bunch of girls at work and I had gone  to see it...bad idea!  We were all freaked out!  Yep, Jaws was a goodie.  It still makes me jump when that shark comes up out of the water at the rear of the boat, and the guy says "we're gonna need a bigger boat".!  Liked "The Birds" too.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 13, 2010, 12:00:21 PM
P. S.  As far as showers, an even scarier thing for me is the scene from Bird On A Wire where Goldie Hawn is showering and a big roach crawls on her head!  Ughhh, that both grosses me out and scares the crap outta me!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on February 13, 2010, 12:54:04 PM
I've never been a horror movie fan, so I have managed to avoid most of them with little effort.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 14, 2010, 09:31:32 AM
 I can understand about the roach, TOMEREADER.  It's unlikely one
of us will ever run into a homicidal maniac but the blasted roaches are
all too common.
  I enjoyed an occasional good scare when I was young enough to think
nothing could happen to me.  Now, I've lost my taste for horror and like
FRYBABE, I avoid them. Would not watch 'Silence of the Lambs' no matter great a movie it was supposed to be.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 14, 2010, 10:00:22 AM
Silence of the Lambs - I wouldn't watch it either Babi - Anthony Hopkins notwithstanding!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 14, 2010, 10:42:47 AM
No horror for me, thanks, but I do like mystery/thrillers, etc.

This is from Marcie’s post in the library.  Lots of good news for film watchers.

Quote
FYI, If  you go to the PBS website at Masterpiece  (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/index.html#giveaway)  
in the middle of the page, one of the blurbs let's you click to sign up for a giveaway of a set of Jane Austen DVDs. When you complete the form you can either sign up for the email newsletter that announces upcoming PBS programs or just enter the contest.

 PBS is going to show an adaptation of James Buchan's The 39 Steps  on Masterpiece Classic on February 28. Read more about it at 39 Steps (http://www.seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/masterpiece/39steps/39steps.html)

Written in the depth of World War I by British public servant John Buchan (later to become Governor General
of Canada), The 39 Steps was eagerly read by soldiers in the trenches, and since then has been adapted several
times for screen, most famously by Alfred Hitchcock in 1935. (A stage adaptation of Hitchcock’s 39 Steps is
currently on Broadway).

To make this experience even more enjoyable, PBS is offering our SeniorLearn readers a free copy of the book but for the postage. These free copies will be available to the first ten people who post a request in our PBS discussion at Masterpiece Discussion  (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=1023.msg59466#msg59466)  or who email JoanP at jonkie@verizon.net.  Don't miss this one! We'll be talking about both the book and the TV show.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanP on February 14, 2010, 03:28:04 PM
Spamming...
As promised, the poll  to determine our Spring Book Club Online in-depth discussions is now open -
We will stay open until Feb. 26.
 You may vote once.
 Notice  the titles in the Suggestion Box heading are linked to reviews.
Note the two different categories:
 1. Your first choice
 2. All the titles  that interest you for future discussion



VOTE HERE - (click this link) (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/X9T285W)


Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on February 22, 2010, 11:03:45 AM
I viewed the last of a three disk series last eve of Adam's presidency.  This is a well done series with excellent acting.  Tom Hanks was cited as one of the executive producers.  I enjoy bios of American presidents and wonder if there are many others I've overlooked.  Might anyone give me a clue?  I am about to complete a very readable book titled What It Takes by Richard Ben Crammer.  It's a tome, about 1,100 pages and has taken me sometime (I'm not a fast reader) but the content is so interesting. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 22, 2010, 11:11:41 AM
This might better belong in the "Mystery" group, but since it now has a movie made from it, I guess it can go here too.  They have taken Dennis Lehane's "Shutter Island" and made it into a movie.  From the clips I have seen, they have used a "horror-type" theme, rather than the wonderful psychological thriller the book is.  I think I will wait till it appears on DVD to see it.  The book was good, but you had to pay attention, especially near the ending.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 22, 2010, 09:43:29 PM
Jim, did you ever see the one-man film, Give em Hell, Harry, starring James Whitmore as Harry Truman.  It was truly remarkable and I do hope they bring it back in the form of DVD someday.  It's apparently available on VHS.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on February 23, 2010, 08:53:03 AM
Harry is somewhat my hero.  There were many great presidents and Harry certainly numbers among them.  No, I haven't seen this DVD.  I will immediately look it up on Netflix; they might have it.  I've read practically every book on him and am particular partial to David Mc Collough's Truman.  Thanks for the tip and should you come across a source let me know.  Incidentally, last eve I saw with great pleasure What the Lord Made (sic) about a white doctor and his black assistant who together made a great medical breakthrough in the early forties.  It's a true story.  Bring along a box of Kleenex.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on February 28, 2010, 03:54:52 PM
Having seen trailers for Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland" I'm going to give it a pass. It scares me; the make-up and costumes are not funny.  Doesn't seem like a children's story.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 01, 2010, 08:04:28 AM
 True stories that call for Kleenex always do appeal to me, JIM.  I'll see if my library has it.
Thanks..
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 01, 2010, 01:04:28 PM
We saw Shutter Island at a Drive-in Theater last night. Can't say I'd recommend it -- we were somewhat disappointed. A little too melodramatic and over-the -top hard to believe. But then I'm not a fan of Leonardo DiCaprio. Altho' he did a couple of good films, he reminds me of a young kid trying to look and act like a grownup.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on March 01, 2010, 01:12:45 PM
I only saw one Tim Burton movie in my life.....perhaps I should say, I only saw part of one Tim Burton movie.  We walked out!  Tim Burton is not on my favorite list and never will be so I don't expect to see how he butchered "Alice".  And Johnny Depp does seem to seek out the bizarre roles, doesn't he?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on March 01, 2010, 04:53:54 PM
Haven't been to a drive-in movie in decades. I hope you necked.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on March 02, 2010, 12:53:27 AM
I have only seen one Tim Burton movie.  Never want to see another!  Too weird, and creepy.

Jim. I recently saw a movie on HBO. called "Frost/Nixon".  I thoroughly enjoyed it.  There are several movies about FDR and Eleanor.  Cannot think of the titles right now.  I also saw on about Woodrow Wilson. 

I enjoy learning about all of our presidents.  There are many programs on the History Channel, and the History Internatioal Channel.  I get the military Channel, too.  They have quite a few programs about different times in world history.  A series I highly reccomend is called:  "The First World War".  It is also a book.

Sheila

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 02, 2010, 09:07:05 AM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)

 




  ??? I didn't know there was a drive-in movie left in the country!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 02, 2010, 11:21:24 AM
Joan K said, "Haven't been to a drive-in movie in decades. I hope you necked."

Well, that might have made the movie (Shutter Island) more interesting, but darn I was with my son!  LOL!  He and I pretty much like the same type of movies.

Yes, Babi, there are still a few drive-in theaters around -- three of them not too far by freeway from where I live.  We like to go once in a while because you don't have to listen to rude people talking or chomping on food during the movie.  And the sound now comes through your car's FM radio, not those old sound boxes.  Trouble is, they show mostly loud action type films which I'm not too fond of. 

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 03, 2010, 08:07:56 AM
  MARJ, I started to say drive-ins were also nice when you didn't want to get dressed up to go
out.  But then it occurred to me that nowadays most people don't seem to feel the need to
get dressed up to go most anywhere.  We'll march into a nice restaurant looking like we've
been out weeding the garden.  :-\
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 03, 2010, 08:08:00 AM
I watched SECONDS (1966), a John Frankenheimer film (he also directed The Manchurian Candidate).  SECONDS was a very strange film I'd never seen before.  Stars Rock Hudson, John Randolph and some minor parts by now well known actors (Will Geer, Murray Hamilton)  It's about a middle aged man (John Randolph) whose life had become pretty blah, and he is offered a new life by a mysterious "company."  For $30 K, they will arrange to "kill" off his current identity and make him into a completely new, younger man (Rock Hudson) with a new face, body, and a brand new life.  He goes for it, but then....
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 03, 2010, 08:45:43 AM
   nowadays most people don't seem to feel the need to
get dressed up to go most anywhere.  We'll march into a nice restaurant looking like we've
been out weeding the garden.  :-\

Absolutely true Babi. Recently whilst staying with son in Sydney we decided on a movie and a casual meal afterwards. DH & I had a quick shower and changed. Son & DIL went as they were.  Others at movie and restaurant were much the same - I wondered if it was meant to be Shabby chic or something. But casual attire sure has a lot going for it. Just think back to our young days when we went to the movies dressed up in our Friday night best. Suits and ties for the lads and good dresses, stockings, high heels and gloves for the girls. Spare me !
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 03, 2010, 09:16:13 AM
 Good point, there, GUM.  I gave up pantyhose and high heels at the first practical opportunity.
Haven't even owned a pair of either for many years now, and am quite happy to be rid of them.  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 03, 2010, 09:20:03 AM
Yes, they're a thing of the past for me too. I think I've got a couple of pairs of new pantyhose but haven't worn them in years. Must discard them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 03, 2010, 05:42:52 PM
Remember girdles?  Gad zooks, we wore them when we didn't even need them.  And those iron maiden things that cinched you in, garter belts, crinolines -- how many did you wear at once.  My uncle always said the main thing he remembered about driving me off to college for the first time was all the men who were carrying all these crinolines into the dorms. Ha. If our granddaughters could hear us they'd think we were talking about the 1500's.

I have given up skirts for the duration.  Haven't worn one in years.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on March 03, 2010, 06:56:47 PM
Did any of you wear "Spring-o-lators", the 1950's version of stilettos? Oh -  the hours I danced in those things (wearing my panty-girdle with the attached loop/button things to hold up my hose - and at least 3 crinolines) !!!!
Huaraches and soft moccasins were our version of Flip-Flops.
No wonder I have to wear ankle/foot braces now!!!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on March 03, 2010, 07:33:55 PM
How 'bout hats?  Remember when the outfit to include a spiffy hat along with the girdle, high heels, nylons and gloves?  I was watching a tribute to Billie Holiday/Lady Day on Ovation which showed her singing in clubs and the all the women were wearing hats!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on March 03, 2010, 08:40:12 PM
I remember dressing like that to go to a college football game!!!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 03, 2010, 10:59:59 PM
Pedln, glad to hear I'm not the only one who never wears skirts.  I don't even own one anymore.

I used to love to get a new hat at Eastertime.  I don't own one of those either.

I think black ladies still like fancy hats -- remember the one worn by the lady who participated in Obama's inauguration?  Also, gorgeous hats show up on the heads of society ladies at the Kentucky Derby.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on March 03, 2010, 11:35:28 PM
You all are my kind of women!  I was injured at work, and retired on a job related disability.  I injured my back.  Spent two years in a hospital bed, in traction.  My husband was blind.  We agreed that I would be his eyes, and he would carry things for me.  We both laughed, as he helped me get into panty hose, when we were going out.

After my injury. I gave up on both skirts, and high heels.  Frankly, I was happy to give up both.  Do any of you remember saddle shoes?  And circular skirts?  Remember sock hops?

Sheila
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on March 04, 2010, 12:15:45 AM
I volunteer at The Oklahoma History Museum, where a huge exhibit on Rock & Roll in Oklahoma opened last summer. 
 
Last Fall, "The 50's" was the theme of our volunteer banquet. Without knowing what anyone else would be wearing,  six of us chose to wear rolled up blue jeans, a man's white shirt (worn untucked), a small scarf around our neck, bobby socks and either saddle shoes or penny loafers - with pennies, of course. It was as if we were back in high school and had called around to be sure we were all dressing alike.  :)

Oh - and four of us wore our guy's class ring on a ribbon around our neck!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 04, 2010, 12:55:11 AM
I'd forgotten about the girdle! And cinch belts around the waist.

Pretty hats are de rigeur at major race meetings here - the Melbourne Cup of course but lots of others as well. And at weddings too. I have plenty of hats with wide brims to keep the sun at bay whenever I'm outdoors. Very necessary!

Have given up on skirts but still have a few ...I think they're making a comeback.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on March 04, 2010, 03:09:44 AM
Hats!  What about those awful veils with spots that danced in front of your eyes?  Gloves!  "A lady doesn't go downtown without white gloves".  Skirts!  I own some, but I can't think when I last wore any of them.  I look dumb in hats, but I do have some wool watch caps for winter and some wide brims for sun.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 04, 2010, 08:10:10 AM
Crinolines? Cinches? Did you really, CALLIE and PEDLN? I've always
associated crinolines with the 19th century!
  I still own a couple of skirts, but only because I never throw away
anything wearable. That doesn't mean I wear them.   ::) I do go through
from time to time and give stuff away, tho'. And what isn't wearable
becomes rags, naturally.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on March 04, 2010, 12:29:26 PM
Absolutely, Babi!  How do you think Elizabeth Taylor kept all those shirtwaist-style dress skirts so "swirly"? ;)

The first semester I lived in a sorority house, I shared a "single" room with a pledge.  I, the member, slept in the room - she slept on the sleeping porch.  However, we shared the closet, dresser, etc.   I finally got tired of her piling her crinolines on my bed - and put them all out in the hall!!  Fortunately, we always switched rooms/roommates at the beginning of each semester.  :D

I once had a black patent leather hat that I wore with a black/white suit, white gloves and black patent leather pumps. If I remember correctly, that's what I wore to interviews with various school districts before I started to teach.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on March 04, 2010, 05:48:48 PM
"Pedln, glad to hear I'm not the only one who never wears skirts". No, I'm a mem,ber of the club, too. I have one dress that I wear to funerals, but I always have to buy new pantyhose to wear with it, because I run them every time I wear them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on March 04, 2010, 07:02:17 PM
I kind of like to wear skirts - particularly in the summertime.  They're so much cooler.  But this under NO circumstances involves pantyhose.  I quit wearing those many, many years ago.  The skirts I wear are usually ankle length, and I wear socks with my sneakers (the only shoes I wear, except for sandals or flipflops in the summertime.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 05, 2010, 08:30:04 AM
I'll bet you were stunning, CALLIE! And what could be more correct for
a proper teacher than black and white?

  I own exactly three pairs of shoes, MARY, including a pair of 'walking'
shoes, aka 'sneakers'.  I would like to have a pair of sandals
(NO thongs) if I could just find a pair with supporting ankle straps.
Seen any like that?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on March 05, 2010, 01:01:37 PM
I remember dressing like that to go to a college football game!!!
OMG, so do I!  And for Homecoming your date would pin a big corsage of Mums on you.  Weren't we spiffy?

And I remember how the Huaraches rubbed blisters on my feet until they softened and got worn in.  And how we didn't dare show up at school in NEW saddle shoes.  I always rubbed dirt on my new saddles before I wore them to school.  My dad had a fit!

And I don't think I remember what a skirt felt like.  ;D  Is that the thing that when I wore it my Mom kept saying, "Will you sit up and put your knees together and try to act like a lady!"
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on March 05, 2010, 01:42:02 PM
Yep, Phyll, that's what it was.  But then...(drum roll) the mini-skirt came into fashion.  And you'd better have those knees together then!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on March 05, 2010, 10:30:28 PM
Phyll,  I forgot about the Mums (probably because I rarely got one  :().   Always got a wrist corsage for dances because of the strapless gowns.

I vaguely remember an admonition for lady-like behavior - "Knees together, teeth apart" - or was it "feet apart"?  I don't remember why either were supposed to be "apart"   :-\

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on March 06, 2010, 12:12:49 AM
Babi, I have my daily sneakers, and my "dress" sneakers - black SAS walkers.  That's as good as it gets. ::)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 06, 2010, 08:45:42 AM
MARY  ;D   
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on March 07, 2010, 10:50:25 AM
when i was in high school, i and most of my friends made our skirts out of 31/2 yards of cotton material, gathered at the waist and lots of crinoline under neath. We wore them w/ our cardigan sweaters turned backward and a small scarf around our necks, the knot turned to the side w/ a circle pin attached. That was the "formal" fashion to Callie's bluejean/bobbie soxer look...................

you may have discussed this before, but i heard someone say that Crazy Heart is from a book, does anyone know if that is the name of the book as well?........................jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on March 07, 2010, 11:54:09 AM
Mabel:  Check this out:  http://www.amazon.com/Crazy-Heart-Novel-Thomas-Cobb/dp/0060915196
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 07, 2010, 12:02:48 PM
As written and directed by first-time filmmaker Scott Cooper

Crazy Heart is a 2009 American musical-drama film, written and directed by Scott Cooper and based on the 1987 novel of the same name by Thomas Cobb -- from wikipedia

Everything said on the media indicates that Jeff Bridges is a shoo-in for Best Actor.  I have not seen it, know little about it.  Some friends of mine saw it and are now wondering if they are too old for that kind of movie.    :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on March 07, 2010, 04:44:34 PM
Oops, I just lost my post.  I think it's floating in cyberspace with other posts I have lost.  Somehow I punched a wrong button.  Most aggravating!!!
I saw the move The Blind Side last week-end.  A real feel good movie.  Well acted, good story line and a sense of humor.  I'm not sure if it was a book, but it is based on a real life story.  Treat yourselves and go see it.
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 08, 2010, 08:29:47 AM
Looks like the media was right, PEDLN.  Jeff Bridges won, and I'm adding the movie to my
queue, along with Blind Side and Up In the Air. I never watch the awards, since
in most cases I haven't seen any of the movies.  But at least they do give me some idea of
which ones I want to order.  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on March 08, 2010, 10:58:21 AM
Well, hubby and I had just watched "The Hurt Locker" yesterday afternoon before the Awards, and I took my morning newspaper and marked the categories/movies I thought would win.  I picked all of the Hurt Locker winners, plus Best Actress/Actor/Movie/Director/Supporting Actress.  I never pick the documentary movies, either foreign or otherwise because I never get to see them.  I did see one however; "The Last Truck, The Closing of a GM Plant"  I saw it a couple months ago, and it was so sad and moving to me, I was sure it would win.  Not!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 08, 2010, 04:30:47 PM
I want to see Up in the Air too, Babi.  And I've put a bunch of the others on my Netflix queue --  don't know when they'll get watched.  Last night I started watching A Serious Man -- didn't know it had made the top 10 Best Picture nominations.  Actually, I wasn't too impressed, and am still not quite sure what is going on.  It's kind of weird.  Not anything I'd expect to be nominated for Best Picture.  Maybe my opinion will change after watching the entire thing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 08, 2010, 08:32:40 PM
Watching the Academy Awards gave me a long list of movies to see.
I'd like also to see the documentaries and the short films.  I hope HBO shows them.

Sorry you didn't care for A SERIOUS MAN, Pedln.  I loved it.  One of the best I've seen in a long time.  Sort of a modern version of the biblical book of Job (Why me, God?),  and so funny.  I loved the answers the rabis gave him.  I'm going to watch it again.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 09, 2010, 08:36:41 AM
 Thanks for the commentary on "Serious Man", MARJ.  I was wondering what it was about
after PEDLN mentioned it, and there you were with the answer. I might enjoy that one.
  I'm frequently surprised by some of the movies that get nominated, PEDLN.  So many
are selected that I don't care for at all.  But no doubt other people do.  Me, I like broccoli, I
just can't safely eat it anymore.   :-X
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 09, 2010, 09:48:39 AM
Well, Marj and Babi, movies are sometimes just a matter of mood.  Maybe when I start watching again I'll enjoy A Serious Man.  I'll admit, I was half thinking about my Latin assignment while watching.  I alwaya appreciate your comments anyway.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on March 09, 2010, 10:25:11 AM
I gleaned some of the Oscar winners and nominees, too, to put on my Netflix queue.  I ordered Up in the Air and Up...now there are two different types.  Also, The Young Victoria.  I love that type of period movie with the beautiful costuming.  And, I discovered that a brand new Wallace and Gromit movie exists, A Matter of Loaf and Death.  Can't wait for that one to come!  Also, I ordered Helen Mirren in The Queen.  It wasn't up for an Oscar this year (came out in 2006) but I haven't seen it and Mirren is a favorite of mine.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on March 09, 2010, 09:23:15 PM
I saw "The Queen" and thought it was superb.  I don't think you'll be disappointed, Phyll.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 10, 2010, 08:12:12 AM
PHYLL, what is a 'Wallace and Gromit' movie?  (Here I am, unabashed,
showing my ignorance again.) I'm trying to imagine what a movie entitled
"A Matter of Loaf and Death" would be about. Definitely sounds 'tongue
in cheek'.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on March 10, 2010, 08:21:32 AM
Babi, here is the trailer for "A Matter of Loaf and Death":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwQGXKOx_Yo

I am so happy to hear that there is a new Wallace and Gromit.


"Chicken Run" is similar in cartoon style and just as funny IMO.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBPXVknON-4

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 10, 2010, 08:37:52 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)






Ah, okay, FRYBABE.  I don't know if I've ever seem one of W' & G',  but I must say the
industry is making some excellent animated movies in the past few years.  Adults can enjoy
them as much as the kids.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on March 10, 2010, 09:12:01 AM
PHYLL, what is a 'Wallace and Gromit' movie?  (Here I am, unabashed,
showing my ignorance again.) I'm trying to imagine what a movie entitled
"A Matter of Loaf and Death" would be about. Definitely sounds 'tongue
in cheek'.

This can explain it better than I can, Babi.  We've been fans of Wallace and Gromit since their first movie and are always impatient for them to make a new one but the movies are a very slow process and take ages to make.  The figures are made of a type of clay and the movements are filmed painstakingly in a process they call Claymation.  I think if you saw one you might be hooked.  Children might enjoy these but they are really made for adults.  Not that they have adult content, just that the humor is more on an adult level.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallace_and_Gromit
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: bellemere on March 10, 2010, 01:39:00 PM
I thought George Clooney's performance in Up in the Air was marvelous, wish he had won.
didn't care for CrazyHeart, but have to admint Jeff Bridges was very convincing.  But the whole theme echoed the movie about Johnny Cash: singer turns alcoholic/addict;' saved by love of a good woman.  At least in the old one  we got to see June Carter Cash lobbing empty beer bottles at Johnny and Jerry Lee Lewis, and watch Johnny trash a motel rooom  All Jeff Bridges did was throw up.  always made the trash can or what the college kids call the Porcelain Altar though.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 11, 2010, 08:00:57 AM
The link certainly has high praise for Wallace and Gromit, PHYLL. Tho'
I would ordinarily think 'claymation' must be pretty stiff and juvenile,
it obviously is making an impact.  I'll have to look into this.
Thanks for the link.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 11, 2010, 09:07:20 AM
I've tried to restrain myself but I just have to say that I can't stand Wallace and Gromit.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on March 11, 2010, 10:06:13 AM
George doesn't like them either, Gumtree, but I do. I don't think George cares for any of the new cartoons. He likes the old Looney Tunes and Disney (especially the original Fantasia).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 11, 2010, 10:10:29 AM
Frybabe: Now you're talking!   :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on March 11, 2010, 01:23:37 PM
I've tried to restrain myself but I just have to say that I can't stand Wallace and Gromit.

You don't need to restrain yourself, Gum.  We are all different in our tastes....thank goodness!  It makes the world, and these discussions, so much more interesting, don't you think?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 13, 2010, 11:43:51 AM
Have been catching up on movies we've missed - this weekend it was The Jane Austen Book Club - enjoyed it very much. The references to the books and characters and relating them to the movie characters were pretty well done but I think it would be a difficult movie for anyone who doesn't know JA's books.

And tonight a re-run of No Reservations - Catherine Zeta Jones and set in the kitchen of a good restaurant. I never cease to be amazed at the egocentricity of chefs. I like good food and I like good restaurants but the antics of some chefs have me in stitches.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on March 13, 2010, 07:04:33 PM
Gumtree, we read "The Jane Austen Book Club" on the old SeniorNet in 2004.  Not only are there character correlations, but also some of the scenes are versions of scenes from the books.  Fowler joined the discussion, and was both informative and lighthearted.  She was at a book signing in Washington, DC about the time we finished, and met with JoanP, Maryal, Maryal's daughter Susan, and me afterward.  She was both gracious and delightful; it was like talking with an old friend about books.

She has written other books , some very different.  My favorite is "Sarah Canary", somewhat surreal, starting out in a Chinese railway camp in California in 1873, and ending up in San Francisco.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 14, 2010, 09:41:57 AM
 Sarah Canary is an interesting name.  I'm currently reading a Marion Bradley book with a
heroine named Truth Jourdemayne.  Of course, her parents were highly irregular.  ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: bellemere on March 15, 2010, 09:18:23 AM
Missed the wardrobe discussion about girdles, etc. but my most embarrassing moment involved panty hose.  Some years ago a colleague of my husband's invited us to his son's bar mitzva ceremony  I knew getting dressed up was in order, but found a run in my last pair of panty hose: we stopped at the convenience store and I got a new pair; wiggled out of the old and int the new in the car.  We parked in the temple parking lot and I got out, noticing that the other woment were dressed like empresses.  One lady tapped me on the arm and said
"Did you drop your scarf?"  It was the old pair of panty hose, stuck to the heel of my shoe!  Of course I wanted to die.  But tucked them into my coat pocket and soldiered on.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 15, 2010, 09:39:22 AM
 Okay, embarrasing moments.  Many years ago the church I attended decided to have the
ladies take up collection one Sunday morning.   I was one of those asked to participate. I
cheerfully agreed and dressed especially nice.  As I walked down the aisle, static cling from
the rug caused my skirt to draw up and cling to me like a wet t-shirt.  After fruitless efforts to
get it to unwrap, I handed my collection plate to someone else and slid into the nearest pew,
red-faced.  Never happened before or after.  Go figure.   :-[
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on March 15, 2010, 11:07:17 AM
Yrs ago I saw the movie Pennies from Heaven and thought it silly and forgettable.  At the insistence of son, I've watched it again last wk and then again last eve and made a 180 degree turn about.  This movie is truly special and deserves one's rapt attn. Steve Martin, Bernadette Peters, Christopher Walken, and Vernal Bagneres are simply outstanding and the choreography masterful.  It's set in 1934 Chicago and while it depicts the dark, depression era of that time, it does so thru music and dancing.  It was a box office flop unfortunately, but not unexpectedly, and I cannot but help feel that it is a movie of enduring quality.  Give it a try. I'll be watching it again and probably, again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 15, 2010, 11:33:50 AM
JimNT:  I used to 'hate' Steve Martin but over the years have grown to appreciate him. Almost all of his films have much more to say than appears on the surface. I haven't seen 'Pennies from Heaven' for years - Thanks for the reminder about it - I'll put it on my DVD queue - one day it will turn up.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 15, 2010, 10:50:12 PM
JimNT, I haven't seen many films with STeve Martin, but just did a Netflix look-up for Pennies from Heaven.  And interesting to note, there are two film versions -- the Martin one and another that's a British miniseries with multiple discs and episodes.

I just finished watching Defiance, based on the book Defiance: The Bielski Partisans by Nechama Tec, a true story about three brothers who make it possible for 1200 Jews to live in the forests of Belurus, thus escaping being sent to internment camps by the Nazis. An excellent film, but quite brutal, with both man and nature conspiring to destroy the lives around them.  In the March BookBytes that PatW has just sent out someone else mentions reading The Bielski Brothers by Peter Duffy.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 16, 2010, 08:26:14 AM
Was that a remake, JIM?  I thought Danny Kaye was in the original
"Pennies From Heaven". ....Nope, checked, it was Bing Crosby. As I
remember, I was somewhat disappointed in that one, too.

  Me, too, GUM.  In his early career, I stopped watching anything with
Steve Martin.  Now, though, I find his work much more appealing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Annie on March 16, 2010, 04:11:33 PM
Steve Martin has been one of my favorites for a long time but one has to preview some of his movies.  My three favorites--Parenthood--Planes,Trains and Automobiles AND AND??? hmmm, what was the name of that one????  Didn't like "Cheaper by the Dozen".  

I also liked John Candy movies and have never seen one that a kid could not watch. I really liked him.

The original Pennies From Heaven was with Bing Crosby, made in 1936: Link--
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0028092/
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on March 16, 2010, 06:43:30 PM
I liked Martin in "Bringing Down the House" with Queen Latifah.  Cute
movie, nothing you'd have to ponder over, just some light-hearted silliness!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on March 18, 2010, 01:58:08 PM
Pedin:  I haven't seen the British miniseries with Bob Hoskins but I plan to.  Interesting side note:  Pennies from Heaven got many rave reviews, with the exception of one party.  Near the end there appears a scene showing a movie scene of Fred Astair & Ginger Rogers which serves as the backdrop for a Steve & Bernadette dance routine (confused?).  Anyway, Fred trashed the movie terribly saying something along the lines that it was a disgrace to the poor people of that era.  Fred, of course, was a master.   
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Octavia on March 18, 2010, 11:17:14 PM
I'm curious to know if anyone else has watched Rachael Ward's first feature film Beautiful Kate?
I thought it was a lovely moving film with a haunting soundtrack, but the subject matter(incest) has turned some people off.
! didn't know when I watched it, that it was adapted from an American book by Newton Thornburg - Cutter and Bone? Having trouble reading my own notes, they made perfect sense at the time, but now they're very enigmatic :).
Rachael has set it in the striking Flinders Ranges in SA. Sophie Lowe is stunning as Kate, and Ben Mendelsohn and Rachael Griffiths are fine actors. Why don't we see more of Mendelsohn, I wonder?
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 18, 2010, 11:44:02 PM
Hi Octavia - Have been wondering where you were. I see you've a cyclone in the offing. Take care.

I haven't seen Beautiful Kate and probably won't - mainly because of the subject matter. As for Ben Mendelsohn - as you say  he's good but not seen much - maybe over exposure when he was younger?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 19, 2010, 11:54:01 AM
And speaking of Ben Mendelsohn - we watched the David Helfgott story 'Shine' this evening - Ben played the young David. He really is an accomplished actor.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Octavia on March 19, 2010, 06:05:57 PM
Shine was a great movie, wasn't it?
 I believe any subject is acceptable if it's handled well. All this recent publicity about Alzheimers has brought it out of the closet and made it something we can talk about.
My stepfather treated Mum's illness as something shameful and embarassing and refused to acknowledge it, so she never got the early help that could have  made a difference.
 
Re Ben's early exposure, I spent some large chunks of my life totally isolated from any media, even radio. It shows sometimes :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 22, 2010, 08:19:20 AM
 OCTAVIA, that's an intriguing remark.  Care to share the circumstances that isolated you from
the media?  That's increasingly rare, since the media has become so all-pervasive.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Octavia on March 22, 2010, 07:08:41 PM
Babi, my husband had a road construction company and a lot of work was in very isolated areas of Queensland. It's totally changed now of course with mobile phones, satellites etc. but in the 60's, 70's and even 80's there were many areas with no reception.
I remember one job site(always set up in bushland) where the men lined a makeshift airstrip holding burning torches to guide the Flying Doctor in to pick up an injured man.
We did have the Flying Doctor wireless but that was only for medical business. They would relay telegrams though, which we dreaded. Interesting times!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 23, 2010, 08:32:55 AM
  Interesting, indeed, OCTAVIA, and definitely for the young and vigorous.  ;)  Thanks for
sharing.  I'm often surprised, and delighted, by the wide variety of backgrounds among
all the participants here. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 23, 2010, 11:28:15 AM
Octavia You made me think of how many times a worried Mum or Dad has lit fires on an outback station runway to guide in the Flying Doc to help a sick or injured child - or stockman.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Octavia on March 23, 2010, 05:38:21 PM

I was really impressed by the medical kit the Flying Doctors gave people. Everything from aspirin to scalpels, all numbered. The doctor would radio "give the patient 2 of no. 28 every 4 hours. No sitting around in crowded waiting rooms :).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 24, 2010, 08:24:52 AM
 And who, I wonder, would be expected to use the scalpels?  :o  Amazing what you can learn
to handle if you must.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on March 24, 2010, 10:26:47 AM
 
And who, I wonder, would be expected to use the scalpels?  :o  Amazing what you can learn
to handle if you must.

Babi -Yes, in the outback it's often a case of 'needs must'  I have personal knowledge of one incident involving an appendectomy performed in a very small, remote town on the edge of the Great Sandy Desert. The surgeon was located in Perth and gave instructions by radio to a telegraphist who actually performed the operation in the Post Office of the town almost 2000 miles away. The patient lived to tell the tale.
There are many similar stories - some involve operations performed by non medical people in Antarctica but most such surgery is of minor proportions.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 24, 2010, 11:10:54 AM
A few years back we discussed the book about the doctor in Antarctica who developed breast cancer while there and more or less directed her own surgery, backed up by the Internet.  Perhaps survival makes its own rules -- you do what you have to do.

I've been in a funk with recent movies from Netflix, rating the viewings with only two or three stars.  Finally, saw Up in the Air the other night, and really enjoyed it.  An interesting focus, kind of a feel good film even when it wasn't happy.  Very realistic (yes), and full of surprises.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 25, 2010, 08:25:00 AM
 Was that their rating, PEDLN, or the one you gave after viewing.  I opt for the 4-5 star movies.
Of course, there are always some highly-rated movies that I still don't care for.  It has occurred
to me that critics, who must view so many movies, may give a higher rating to a movie just
because it said something startling or somewhat original.  (I doubt if there is anything truly
original left to do or say.)

  "needs must", GUM, but my hat (if I wore one) is off to them, anyway.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 25, 2010, 09:47:45 PM
We just watched Up in the Air too, Pedln, and liked it.  It was a bit sad, tho'.  I like George Clooney.  (sexy eyes!)

We just subscribed to Netflix.  Don't know what took so long.  Love to be able to call up a movie instantly.  We were like kids in a candy store for awhile.

Just watched Bill Maher's Religulous and got a big kick out of it.  But as an atheist, I like that kind of stuff.

Marj

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 26, 2010, 06:50:05 PM
Babi, most of the time I don't pay attention to Netflix ratings before watching a film. My stars may be different from theirs.  For me, three stars means, ok, nothing super,but not bad.  Four stars -- very good really enjoyed it.  Five stars --probably watched it all in one night, really super,"couldn't put it down."

I find that I do pay attention to the films Netflix recommends to me -- have picked up more than one sleeper that way.

Marjifay, I love Netlix, have had it for years, but it took along time for my kids to convince me. And tnen, like you, I wondered why.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on March 27, 2010, 01:37:04 PM
I loved Netflix when I first got it: used it a lot. After a couple of years, I found I wasn't using it anymore, and cancelled. But I think everyone who likes movies should give it a try.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 28, 2010, 08:16:22 AM
 Netflix provides a lot of our entertainment.  Umpteen channels on TV, and there are still many
evenings when everything I'm interested in is a re-run.  Even channels like biography seem to
find only gangsters interesting.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on March 28, 2010, 12:10:23 PM
We've been watching (on Netflix) the episodes of House of Cards, based on books by Michael Dobbs, that were never played here in the states.  I love Ian Richardson in this part and thoroughly enjoyed the first of the series that played on PBS back in the early 90's .  I was surprised that there were two more seasons that were never offered here, but I found out why....they are really X rated!  Don't know why they thought they had to go that way to tell a good story but I'm still enjoying Ian Richardson.  He was a wonderful actor and especially good....and evil...in this story that tells how absolute power can corrupt absolutely.  
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 28, 2010, 12:58:56 PM
Thanks, Phyll, for your review of House of Cards.  Sounds very good.  I didn't know you could get TV series on Netflix.  That's great to know.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on March 28, 2010, 05:14:22 PM
Phyll, I watched and loved House of Cards.  I did not know other episodes were made.  I really ought to join Netflix again just to get the later episodes.  How are they listed?  Didn't Ian Richardson's character give you the creeps?  He was so evil!
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on March 28, 2010, 05:24:06 PM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


Marj, the TV seasons are a really nice part of Netflix.  I first got hooked on them with a British sit-com that I'd never seen on US TV -- As Time Goes By -- with Judi Dench.  So much fun.

Phyll --Re: House of Cards  --  I don't remember any x-rated ones. Would that be disc III -- the final cut?

I was surprised when my son told me that his family was Law and Order from Netflix. There's not enough of it on TV?   :-*



Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on March 28, 2010, 08:27:40 PM
I'll have to look into House of Cards. I like Ian Richardson.

Pedln, you've never seen As Time Goes By on TV? My PBS station runs that and a few others. Sat. night is Brit night here.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on March 29, 2010, 02:54:33 PM
The first season was called "House of Cards", the second, "To Play the King"; the third, "Final Cut".  There was some nudity in To Play the King and some sex scenes and more nudity in Final Cut.  I found them to be unnecessary to the telling of a good story but then...that is the way of television writers, isn't it?  The whole series is made excellent by the acting of Ian Richardson but he also had a great supporting cast.  I understand the British public was upset with To Play the King because of the way the character of the King (who was supposedly based on Charles) was portrayed.  I really recommend it.  It is more than worth the price of Netflix.   
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 30, 2010, 08:30:15 AM
I watched 'As Time Goes By' and thoroughly enjoyed it. It ran on PBS on
Sunday evenings, as I recall. House of Cards I didn't watch; the theme was
one that depresses and unsettles me and I saw no point in doing that to
myself.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 30, 2010, 11:07:31 AM
I tried to watch PBS' SHARPE'S CHALLENGE recommended by someone in this group.  But I was lost right at the beginning -- didn't know who was fighting whom, and needed subtitles because of the British accents.  But I'd like to read one of the books in this series, as it did look interesting.

I watched the 1974 movie, THE GREAT GATSBY, from Netflix, as I'm reading the book with another group.  I didn't expect much, but was surprised to find I really liked the film.  Good acting -- Robert Redford, Mia Farrow, Bruce Dern and Karen Black (how time flies...Karen Black is now 70 years old!)

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on March 30, 2010, 06:40:27 PM
"As Time goes By" shows in a loop on our PBS stations -- they show all the episodes, then start again. I've seen each episode at least 3 times, but still watch it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on March 30, 2010, 07:23:57 PM
Me, too.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 31, 2010, 09:09:06 AM
 If you had been with us in the discussion of "KIM", MARJ, you would
have known immediately where you were and what was happening. That really added to my enjoyment of the show. It was India, on the
border between the British-controlled states and those still nominally
in the hands of the Rajahs.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on March 31, 2010, 09:10:52 AM
If you had been with us in the discussion of "KIM", MARJ, you would
have known immediately where you were and what was happening. That really added to my enjoyment of the show. It was India, on the
border between the British-controlled states and those still nominally
in the hands of the Rajahs.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on March 31, 2010, 01:39:31 PM
Thanks, Babi.  Sorry I missed the KIM discussion  And I have that book, but have never read it.  Will get it out and read over the SrLearn discussion. 
Marj


Babi said:
If you had been with us in the discussion of "KIM", MARJ, you would
have known immediately where you were and what was happening. That really added to my enjoyment of the show. It was India, on the
border between the British-controlled states and those still nominally
in the hands of the Rajahs.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 01, 2010, 08:49:31 AM
 "Kim" is basically a book for youngsters, but grown-ups enjoy it, too, MARJ.  If you have a
chance, by all means dust it off and give it a try. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on April 01, 2010, 04:38:51 PM
I usually despise romantic comedy but my dear wife got me hooked on one the other eve titled Family Man with Nicolas Cage and Tea Leoni.  I'm sure it hasn't or want win any awards but for an evening of sheer entertainment, I highly recommend it.  I've always been a Cage fan although some of the scripts he chooses are not my cup of tea, and Leoni, well she's easy on the eyes.  I would categorize it as sentimental and it has a fun plot.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on April 01, 2010, 08:21:29 PM
Yes, Marj, do give "Kim" a try.  (I'm not a neutral observer; I've loved the book since I first read it as a kid, and picking it apart for the discussion only made me love it more.)

I finally got around to watching the 1950 movie of "Kim", with Errol Flynn as the horse trader Mahbub Ali and Dean Stockwell as Kim.  It's not a particularly good movie, though it has it's moments, and it does a particularly poor job of the religious side and the character of the lama.  But it was OK as light entertainment.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on April 02, 2010, 01:44:56 PM
Thanks, Babi and PatH.  I will dust off KIM and read it.  I bought it some time ago when I was reading TOURNAMENT OF SHADOWS; THE GREAT GAME AND THE RACE FOR EMPIRE IN CENTRAL ASIA by Karl Ernest Meyer.  A great book BTW, as is Peter Hopkirk's THE GREAT GAME.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 03, 2010, 09:45:38 AM
Every time I come to this site I have to open another tab with Netflix.  Jim, I just added Family Man to my queue.

And removed Girl with the Dragon Tatoo.  Whenever I visit my New York daughter I always try to get my 'big screen' fix with a foreign subtitled film. This week's choices were Girl, Vincere (about Mussilini's lovers) and White Ribbon (Germany just before WW I.) Girl worked out best for us logistically.

I don't know how to rate it, have not read the book.  The mystery plot, the acting, very good, interesting.  But very violent, and a lot of sexual scenes.  The three of us who saw it agreed that there was much that was extreme, that could have been left out, and it was a bit long. We all enjoyed the first part of the film, and the final scene was absolutely perfect.  My daughter's friend, who had read the book, said she thought the movie was better than the book.

A good bit will keep you on the edge of your seat -- good plot development, but you will also say, "oh for heaven's sakes, why this."

Can you believe -- $12.50 for a 4:45 pm show?  ($9.00 for seniors)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on April 05, 2010, 12:07:57 AM
Here is a website that my nephew put me onto today. http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/HomePage   It is about "tricks of the trade" that writers of fiction use. I guess that means literary devices. Oh, in case you are wondering why I put this into this discussion, we were talking about The Book Thief and the movie impending movie. Jason was interested in Death as narrator and Death's little asides and thoughts that are interspersed throughout the book. With a name like TV Tropes, I am guessing the emphasis is on screenwriting and books made into movies and tv programs.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on April 06, 2010, 02:04:45 PM
Fry:  Just scrolling the index has me salivating.  What fun to read through this.  Thanks and thank your nephew.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on April 07, 2010, 04:48:37 PM
On the recommendation of a friend, I just read an autobiography titled The Seventh Muse about the rise from near poverty conditions of a young man to President of Auburn University.  Quite a read.  Short, succcinct, and a page turner.  It's rated 5 stars on Amazon, if that means anything to one.  In this case, I would agree.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Octavia on April 07, 2010, 09:14:42 PM
I wonder if there's any Doctor Who fans here? The new doctor(Matthew Smith?) is being touted as the best Doctor ever, although it'd be hard to top David Tennant. I saw Matthew in a British series about politics called Party Games, and he was quite good in that.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 08, 2010, 08:23:41 AM
JIM, do mention that autobiography over in Non-fiction. Ella would be
interested in that book, I believe.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 10, 2010, 03:11:54 PM
Octavia, I don't think I've ever watched Dr. Who, but I remember that my kids did (as teen-agers) several years ago, and liked it.  I remember think that it was probably quirky or weird.  Funny how we pick up opinions about something without ever really learning if they're on track or not. 

The other night I watched an oldie and loved it -- Paper Chase with John Houseman and Timothy Bottoms.  I'd seen it a couple of times before, but only remembered the final scene. I guess it was a timely choice, what with all the TV news about Justice Stevens retiring.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 21, 2010, 08:22:57 AM
Has anyone seen anything good?

The other night I watch Two Weeks with Sally Field.  A well-done independent film about a terminally ill mother whose four children have come to be with her for her remaining days.  It sounds depressing, but was not, and even had its humorous parts.

JimNT, Family Man is due to arrive today.  Earlier this week I did watch another Nicholas Cage -- Bad Lieutenant: Port of New Orleans.  I watched the entire film, but it was not my thing -- bad cop show.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 21, 2010, 08:44:53 AM
 I'm a great admirer of Sally Field, both as an actress and as a person.  I don't think I've ever
seen any role she didn't do well.  Thanks for mentioning "Two Weeks", PEDLN.  I'll add that to
my list.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on April 21, 2010, 09:04:46 AM
I watched Last Chance Harvey yesterday. It was okay - a mild movie to watch when you don't want to think too much or don't need a lot of stressful scenes.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 22, 2010, 10:06:28 AM
Frybabe, I guess you could also say that film is not real memorable.  I went to check it out on Netflix and found I'd given it a 3 about a year ago.  That's my designation for ok, not outstanding.  Both Dustin Hoffman and Emma Thompson got Golden Globe nominations for their performances.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on April 22, 2010, 05:00:11 PM
The best movie I've seen in a while is The Blind Side with Sandra Bullock.  Did anyone see it and what did you think?  The movie made me laugh, and cry and the fact that it was based on a real life story made it even better.
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 23, 2010, 08:09:07 AM
 I've got 'Blind Side' on my Netflix queue, SALLY.  I've always liked Sandra Bullock's movies and
don't miss one if I can help it.
  "Last Chance Harvey" certainly wasn't what you would call a fast-paced movie, but it left me
with a warm, satisfied feeling.  It wasn't two kids falling in love;  it was two mature, intelligent
adults. Different scene entirely.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on April 26, 2010, 01:45:57 PM
I saw Days of Heaven last eve and was treated to some of the most beautiful cinematography I've ever seen in a movie.  A very young Richard Gere and Sam Shepherd comprised the cast but the scenery overshadowed the plot.  It would do well to have a sub woofer to appreciate the wheat harvest machinery sounds.  This one is dated but worth a look.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 26, 2010, 06:31:29 PM
Jim, I’m so glad you mentioned Days of Heaven.  It sounds fantastic and is definitely going on my queue.  This is what  Netflix reviewers had to say --

Quote
This period film, set around 1916, is art in motion.  What takes this movie out of the ordinary is the replacement of slick movie-making with artistic creativeness.

Quote
  If Andrew Wyeth had been a filmmaker, his movies would have resembled Days of Heaven.

Quote
This is the best example of a narrative being told through imagery that I've ever seen.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on April 26, 2010, 07:52:32 PM
This is pretty old hat, both as to the book and the movie, but I recently watched the 1956 version of "Moby-Dick", with Gregory Peck as Captain Ahab.  It seems better to me than I remember from 1956.  Director Huston does a good job of capturing the mood and the point of the novel, Peck is great as Ahab, and Richard Baseheart does well as Ishmael.  It sweeps along nicely, building well to the climax.  Special effects aren't what they would be now, but who cares?

An amusing point: the only writer credited beside Melville himself is science fiction writer Ray Bradbury.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on April 26, 2010, 10:05:03 PM
Did Bradbury write the screenplay?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on April 27, 2010, 07:58:33 AM
Ray Bradbury screenwriter for Moby Dick? I looked it up and sure enough there he was along with John Huston and Norm Corwin who didn't get credited. Then I looked down the cast list and discovered that Joan Plowright played the part of Starbuck's wife. She also didn't get credited. I must watch this movie again. Haven't seen it in eons. I don't remember Orson Welles being in it, but there he is in the casting list as Father Mapple.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on April 27, 2010, 09:31:01 AM
Thanks for the recommendation, JIM. Sounds good.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on May 02, 2010, 04:05:47 PM
Was just watching Moll Flanders on the Independent Channel - the 1996 version, it was quite good, much better than the early version - this had  Robin Wright, Morgan Freeman, and Stockard Channing. It was too hot and humid here today to any thing but be a coach potato. .......jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 08, 2010, 08:52:06 PM
Those are some good ones, Jean. I don't think I've seen Stockard Channing since West Wing.

Has anyone been watching anything good lately?  I still have Jim’s recommendation of Family Man here, but haven’t seen it yet.  Last night I watched Matt Damen in The Informant – about the price fixing charges against Archer Daniels Midland.  I always enjoy Matt Damen’s films, but some of them have plots that you really have to watch carefully, and such was the case with this one.  For total relaxation I followed up on Ginny’s recommend of My Life in Ruins – lots of good Greek scenery and the many quirks of tour group tourists, and somewhere along the line I picked up How to Make an American Quilt – more quirky characters, including one played by Anne Bancroft.

Those of you who subscribe to Netflix, do you find that you pick up on their recommendations “based on your .  .  . etc.”  For many years I saw very few movies, due to hearing problems, but am now picking them up, films from the ‘80s and ‘90s.  A mixed bag – the goods and not-so-goods.

Has anyone seen Babies?  I’ve saw the previews in NY and have seen the trailers.  A photographer followed four babies from four different parts of the world through their first year.  Awwwwwwwwww.

Babies (http://movies.nytimes.com/2010/05/07/movies/07babies.html?hpw)

This looks like a winner.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 09, 2010, 08:44:24 AM
  I saw that promo, PEDLN, and I think I would love to see the film  It opened around here this
weekend in time for Mother's Day.  Of course, I'll be waiting to see if Netflix picks it up. 
Though since the babies obviously aren't going to be doing much talking,  CC probably won't
matter much.
  I watched "The Lion in Winter" last night.  Haven't seen it since it came out ages ago. Splendid
acting....terrible family! 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 09, 2010, 10:23:58 AM
Hey, Babi.  I watched bits and pieces of "Lion" too.  I came in after it started, and played my usual game of "what film is this?" and all I could think of was Eleanor of Aquitaine. But it didn't suit the mood of the moment, so I switched to pure escapism with the library DVD of Frantic with Harrison Ford and Betty Buckley (who she?).

Somewhere I read that Babies has practically no dialog.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on May 09, 2010, 10:22:30 PM
Lion in Winter was a great film!

Pedlin asked if anyone chooses films to watch based on Netflix recommendations.  I don't.  I watch a lot of films after reading the book.  I belong to several book discussion groups and get lots of good recommendations from people whose choice of books I like.  I also choose from academy award winner lists, NY Times movie reviews, and friends recommendations.  A group from which I've gotten some great suggestions, is the Constant Reader book discussion group.

Some films on my Netflix queue:
Tea With Mussolini
My House in Umbria
Notes on a Scandal (I read the book)
Brideshead Revisited (also read this)
In Bruges
In Old Chicago (1937) 
Revanche (Austrian film)
Frozen River
The Ghost Writer
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on May 09, 2010, 10:49:08 PM
I do sometimes get useful recommendations from Netflix, but more often, it's only amusing to figure out why they are recommending this stuff.  For years they have been suggesting Miss Congeniality--I've no idea why, I'm definitely not interested.

Marjifay, which Brideshead Revisited is on your queue?  I haven't seen the 2008 one, but the 1981 many disc version with Anthony Andrews, Jeremy Irons, and Diana Quick plus other greats is a remarkable job of capturing the spirit of the book.  Just about everyone looks right for the part and acts right for the part.  And because they have so much time, they present the book pretty much intact.  It's a magnificent job.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on May 09, 2010, 11:52:46 PM
Miss Congeniality is a fun movie - just fluff, but lots of fun.  We watch it on TV from time to time.  You might like it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on May 10, 2010, 06:03:53 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


I have the 1981 version of Brideshead Revisited (4 discs) on my Netflix queue, Pat.  With Jeromy Irons, Anthony Andrews, etc.  Wonderful.  I've only watched the first two discs so far.  They really brought the book to life.  Great acting--yes, as you said, a magnificent job.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 10, 2010, 08:24:59 AM
Actually, PAT, 'Miss Congeniality' was a lot of fun, and an excellent
acting job by Sandra Bullock. I've seen it twice.   That was when I really
first took notice of Bullock and I've been following her movies ever since.
Her current one is, I understand, based on a true story and is getting fine reviews.
It's called "The Blind Side" and it's on my queue.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on May 10, 2010, 08:47:09 AM
The first Sandra Bullock movie I remember seeing is The Net. They've been showing it on cable recently.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Annie on May 10, 2010, 09:16:25 AM
My favorite Bullock movie is "While You Were Sleeping". And wasn't that her in "Practical Magic", another favorite of mine.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on May 10, 2010, 12:08:41 PM
Marjifay, you list looks great!  I've seen all but the Austrian film and In Old Chicago.  In Bruges is filled with cursing and very violent.  While I have read Girl with the Dragon Tatoo, it is only recently out at the movie theatres, and I've not seen it yet.  Book kept my interest though.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on May 10, 2010, 12:11:43 PM
Just watched "The Blind Side" yesterday with hubby and eldest daughter. (get your kleenex out) Wonderful film, Bullocks best role yet, but I like her in the comedies!  Congeniality2 is not anywhere up to the original one.  I also liked her in Speed (the original); The Net; Practical Magic and I think she was in Love Potion #9.   Hope Floats is pretty good.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on May 10, 2010, 12:44:28 PM
I never heard of Practical Magic. She was good in Two Week's Notice too, and I liked her and Keneau Reeves in The Lake House. Oh, and I almost forgot - one of the very, very few Silvester Stallone movies I liked, Demolition Man.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on May 10, 2010, 01:22:17 PM
Forgot about "Lake House" - - I loved that too.  "Two Weeks Notice" was funny, funny.  Love Hugh Grant, also.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on May 10, 2010, 09:56:01 PM
I liked "The Lake house" too. Although, I'll watch almost anything with Keneau Reeves in it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on May 10, 2010, 10:50:02 PM
Me, too!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 11, 2010, 08:35:02 AM
 I see I've missed one or two Bullock movies.  Hold on a sec, while I jot them down.  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 11, 2010, 04:01:40 PM
Marjifay, that is a great list of films.  I’ve seen quite a few of them.  Loved the Anthony Adrews Brideshead Revisitied and also My House in Umbria.  I was disappointed with In Bruges, good scenery, though.  As for Girl with the Dragon Tatoo – it will keep your attention, though the violence and sex is really extreme.

Frozen River is on my queue too, but I don’t know who or what  recommended it to me.  Maybe Netflix.  Now I’m waiting for the next five star film.  For me, there’s only been about 5 in the last year --  Recent Five Stars –

          Two Weeks
          Paper Chase --   a golden oldie
          Julie and Julia
          The Station Agent
          Beyond Silence  (German)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 12, 2010, 08:47:27 AM
 Thanks for the warning, PEDLN.  I'll skip the 'Tattoo' film; extreme violence and sex really doesn't appeal to me. Hopefully the book is not
as bad; at least it's not visual.
  On further investigation, I realized I had seen the Bullock movies I
thought I'd missed; I'd just forgotten the titles.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on May 12, 2010, 11:20:36 AM
Ahh, The Station Agent!  Simply loved that film!

What is "Beyond Silence" about?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 12, 2010, 11:35:42 AM
Tomereader,  Beyond Silence is about a hearing child whose parents are both deaf.  Conflicts arise when the child is given a clarinet by her father's sister, who is a professional clarinetist.  I found it to be a fascinating film.  The actors portraying the parents were deaf, one French, one German, and the sign language used was German.  It's a German film with English subtitles.  Another interesting feature was watching the child grow into a young woman.  Two actresses, but so similar in appearance you don't realize it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on May 12, 2010, 12:23:29 PM
Babi, I did not enjoy "Girl with a Tatoo".  It was too depressing, and had too much violence and sexual molestation for me.  It put images and thoughts in my mind that I did not wish to be there!  It was well written--just not my kind of book.
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: winsummm on May 12, 2010, 06:30:29 PM
JoanK quote
Quote
I liked "The Lake house" too. Although, I'll watch almost anything with Keneau Reeves in it.
me too and that was a really good movie. I have not read the book. I wonder if my Kindle has it.

claire
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on May 12, 2010, 07:08:18 PM
Thanks for your film recommendations, Pedln.  I saw the Paper Chase a long time ago -- I agree, a great film.  I just haven't been too interested in watching Julie and Julia for some reason, but I added it to my Netflix queue, along with the other three I have not seen.

I've been trying to read with another group Thornton Wilder's novel, The Bridge of San Luis Rey,  a difficult one to get through.  So I put the 1944 film version on my queue, along with Our Town (the one with Paul Newman as the Stage Manager) which I saw before and read the play, and loved.
Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 13, 2010, 08:02:43 AM
Quote
It put images and thoughts in my mind that I did not wish to be there!

(SALLY)
 Alas, yes. Once seen, there forever, and cropping up unwanted at odd
times. I've learned to censor carefully what goes into my mind, if at all
possible.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on May 13, 2010, 03:01:36 PM
I didn't know Paul Newman did "Our Town". Makes me want to rejoin netflix just to get it!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on May 14, 2010, 12:11:52 PM
Sally said: It put images and thoughts in my mind that I did not wish to be there!  It was well written--just not my kind of book.

It would be nice if we could have only nice, pleasant thoughts in our head, wouldn't it?  But I guess we'd then better not read the newspapers, listen to the television news, etc.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on May 14, 2010, 04:08:55 PM
Marj--that's exactly why I do not like to read about those things in novels.  I get enough of it in real life.  Most of my reading is done for entertainment and pleasure therefore I do not wish to read about sexual perversion, extreme cruelty, etc.  There are too many books out there for me to enjoy!
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mrssherlock on May 14, 2010, 08:10:02 PM
I read only local newspapers, the Salem and the Portland papers.  (The Knights of Columbus had a spaghetti feed last weekend.  $10!)  Only watch News Hour on PBS.  Listen to NPR which has a twice daily one-hour BBC World News. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 15, 2010, 08:29:17 AM
 JACKIE, have you read a little book called "Lumby Lines"?  You would love their newspaper!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 15, 2010, 11:32:11 AM
JoanK, I'm finding that I enjoy the TV programs that I get through Netflix as much as the movies.  It's so hard to keep up with weekly TV shows, and this way there are no commercials.  Of course, I'm a few years behind the times.

I'm getting a new TV DVD on Monday -- Ballykissangel -- has anyone seen that?  I know nothing about it.  And don't remember who recommended it.

You all are so smart and know all the shows, please help me out here. What is the name of --  I think it's a TV series from several years ago -- about a family, the setting in Seattle (I think.) The mother dies in a horrible crime scene, a son is severely injured in the same scene. There are both married and unmarried children.  The dad later meets and starts dating a lady doctor. They ride bikes. I think Adam Arkin plays a son-in-law. (I tried looking him up, but there is so much.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on May 15, 2010, 11:47:51 AM
Pedlin, the title of the TV show was "A Year in the Life".  I think 1986 or '96.  Arkin was, indeed, in it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 15, 2010, 02:07:34 PM
Thank you tomereader.  You are right and there is a brief article about it in Wikipedia.  I was thinking I would like to see that show again, but there is nothing at either Netflix or Amazon.  Maybe some day.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on May 15, 2010, 02:12:10 PM
I watched Ballykissangel and absolutely loved it.  I think you will, too.  I had forgotten all about it.  Thanks for mentioning it.  I may have to rejoin Netflix just to revisit programs like this.
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 16, 2010, 08:49:39 AM
 What an odd title....'Ballykissangel'!   What on earth is that about?
 
   We like watching old series via DVD also.  There were some we missed or never heard of,
like the British 'Primeval', that we're enjoying now.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on May 16, 2010, 06:25:51 PM
BallyK, as the natives called it, is a town in Ireland and the action is very character driven.  The acting is excellent, and the story revolves around all the characters in the story, a feminist pub owner, a priest, a female vet, a wealthy man who feels he owns the town, his two not too bright workers, and many more.  If you get a chance you must watch this program.  It will make you laugh and cry and keep you anxious for the next episode!
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 17, 2010, 08:30:52 AM
You've sold me, SALLY.   I'll look for it on Netflix.  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 17, 2010, 10:33:47 AM
I watched Episode 1 last night, Babi.  Very enjoyable, different.  Sally has described it well.  And it is captioned. At first I didn't think it was, but it is.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on May 17, 2010, 02:05:44 PM
Watched Foyle's war last night. I liked it, as usual. At the end, Foyle is off to America on the Queen Mary.

I hope they do the next episode on the Queen Mary! I sailed to England on it in 1963. Now it is berthed in Long Beach. My son and I did a tour of it last year: because I was a former passenger, I got royal treatmeent, and introduced to the current "Captain".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on May 17, 2010, 02:59:00 PM
I finally got through an entire Foyle last night. For once it held my interest. Miss Marple is up next. I will have to remind Mom. Miss Marple is one of her favorites.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 18, 2010, 07:50:37 AM
 You sailed on the Queen Mary, JOAN!  What great memories you must have. 

  Last Sunday's Foyle episode was especially good.  Very complex plot that really kept me
guessing and totally surprised me at the end.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 18, 2010, 10:38:27 AM
JoanK, you set me to thinking about the Queen Mary last night.  I've never seen it, but a couple friends of mine have been on it more than once.  I think they were on its last voyage, but not sure.

But I was wondering, thinking about air travel all messed up because of volcanic eruptions. Are there any ships nowadays that make straight ocean-crossing trips -- without taking you on a tour?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on May 19, 2010, 10:37:54 PM
But I was wondering, thinking about air travel all messed up because of volcanic eruptions. Are there any ships nowadays that make straight ocean-crossing trips -- without taking you on a tour?
Good question, Pedln, I don't know of any.

I sailed on the Queen Mary too, in late September 1958, coming back from a year in Zurich.  It was a very rough crossing.  Bob stayed in the room for several days, looking pretty green.  I'm pretty resistant to seasickness, so after half a day I was OK, but the dining room was pretty empty, and the shipboard social life was definitely minimal.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on May 20, 2010, 09:49:50 AM
Shall I chime in ... while we're off subject, on travel by ship.     :P

In Sep 1966 we took a huge, supposedly stable ship across from NY to Naples, the Italian line's Michaelangelo.   It was 6 days en route, and I was bored to tears.  We were en route to Israel for my husband's year teaching at Hebrew University (in English) in Israel.
 
We had our 1 year old with us, and the ship's day care didn't work, because the "nice" Italian nannies let our daughter have all the candy she could eat, and she was sick.
I took something like Dramamine because the motion bothered me, so I slept in the daytime way too much ... out like a light on the medicine.
My husband worked ... he was writing a book ... so he didn't care where he was.
The waiter spilled OJ down my back at breakfast and did not say he was sorry, not even in Italian.   But when I felt well enough to eat, I must admit the food was delicious.

Never again ... we flew to return at the end of our year, and shipped our stuff by freight.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 21, 2010, 08:28:21 AM
 I wonder whether that particular Italian shipping line is still in business,
MIPPY.  They didn't seem to have a good grip on passenger care and
satisfaction.  :-X
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on May 22, 2010, 02:49:47 PM
MIPPY: we were in Israel at the same time!! I wish I'd known you then -- I was in Beer Sheva, but I would have gladly made the trip to Jerusalem to see you.

The tour of the queen Mary tells how glamorous it was in first class. Maybe,-- Dick and I were in tourest class, and I was bored to death too. (It was Winter, and too rough to go outside, so we played scrabble the whole way. Except when Dick was seasick. There were days when I was the only person in the diningroom).

The others didn't miss much -- the English cooking was uniformly tasteless. But served in style! The waiter would approach with a silver covered tray, whip the cover off with a flourish, only to reveal a small dish of lukewarm canned fruit cocktail.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 23, 2010, 08:39:53 AM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)
[/ 



Oh, how disappointing!  Surely the Queen Mary could do better than
canned fruit cocktail, even in tourist class.  Was this, perhaps, during the
period when the British economy was so tight and rationing was still in
place?  British cuisine has never been the best, even in good times.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 25, 2010, 11:21:56 AM
Okay, folks, clue me in.  Have I missed a big event?  I'd never even heard of LOST until last year because one of the grands had a DVD of it.  But now Time mag. had a big article (which I missed because I gave it to a friend so she could read about Stieg Larsson).  And the media had a big DO -- pre, and post the last episode.  So what have I missed?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on May 25, 2010, 11:36:30 AM
"Lost"  is so science fiction-y that I can't stand it.   I watched some of the first season and did not continue.   But apparently 10s of thousand of people loved it.    Unless you really, really like science fiction, I wouldn't bother to rent it.

Speaking of being lost, I loved that Tom Hanks movie, the one where the FEDEX plane crashed,  and he had the basketball "Wilson" as his "boy-Friday"  ...   that was Cast Away !
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on May 25, 2010, 03:10:59 PM
The Cider House Rules was on TV this morning. I had seen a little of it before and would have liked to see the whole thing but didn't have the time this morning. In truth, I don't like to watch TV in the morning except for news and weather. Anyhow, it just now came to my attention that it was written by John Irving.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 26, 2010, 08:26:47 AM
 My daughter loved "Lost" and watched it faithfully.  I found it so complex and confusing that
I stopped watching it sometime in, I think, the second season, when the plot started going all
over the place.  But it has been immensely popular, so, like MASH, the final episode was a big
event.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 26, 2010, 11:31:56 AM
Mippy and Babi, thanks for the LOST info.  I'm not really into sci-fi, so will let that one pass for a while.  No doubt at some point it will be available from Netflix, perhaps some of it already is.

Mippy, I liked Castaway.  I like just about anything that Tom Hanks is in.  Was BIG his first big film?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on May 26, 2010, 04:32:39 PM
I don't know the order of film without using IMDB  ...  Big was also wonderful!
Probably watched it three times, which is unusual for me.

As of last week, I now have Comcast On Demand, so there are a lot of movies to pick through.   But RedSox ball games take the TV above all else these days!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on May 30, 2010, 09:01:44 AM
Lately none of my Netflix films have rated a 4 or a 5.  I was beginning to get a complex, thinking maybe I just didn't know what a good film was anymore.  Then last night I just  happened to hit the beginning of The Best Years of Our Lives.  No more complex.  What a terrific film, and it doesn't matter that I watch it every couple of years or so.

Besides being a terrific film, it has a special meaning for me because when I was growing up in southern Wisconsin my family rented the "Bickel" house, boyhood home of Frederic (Bickel) March.  My school sent him a congratulatory telegram because he had gone there too  -- and had made his acting debut with  "I'm gonna thit on  a chair and wait for Thanta Clauth."

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on May 30, 2010, 10:54:41 AM
 Thanks, PEDLN, for that big grin I enjoyed with your post about Fredric March's 'debut'.  We
finally got, and watched, "The Blind Side".  It was great.  I had expected to enjoy Sandra Bullock, but I very much liked Tim McGraw as SeanTuohy as well.
  Leigh Ann Tuohy and Michael Oher were guest participants in a recent 'Extreme Makeover' house raising, and Leigh Ann is just as energetic and 'take-charge' as she is portrayed. 
   
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on June 02, 2010, 11:02:09 PM
Darn Drat and Blast.

I just wrote a spiel about "Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence" book by Laurens van der Post, and it floated off to Cyberspace.  One of my favourite movies with David Bowie, Tom Conti, Jack Thompson and Riyuchi Sakamoto.

Another favourite "Atonement" by Ian McEwan.  With Keira Knightley.

"The English Patient" by Michael Ondaatje with Ralph (Rafe) Fiennes, Juliette Binoche and Kristin Scott Thomas.

I just realised that all of the above have a "war" connection.  Being Australian and a baby boomer I never truly suffered the consequences of war.  I do not wish to offend anyone with my choices. 

Recently - Avatar - a bit too long (not sure if it was a book either).

"Clash of the Titans" featuring Perseus (an Australian :D)  Impeccable authorship - Greek myth.



Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 03, 2010, 08:18:16 AM
 I haven't heard of "Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence" before, ROSE.  What
was that about?  Besides, apparently, some connection with war. I must
confess David Bowie is not a favorite of mine, perhaps because the first movie I saw featuring him I didn't like at all.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on June 03, 2010, 08:36:42 AM
The English Patient is also a favorite of mine.  I liked the film better than the book, amazingly.

I hardly ever watch movies over and over, but found an exception last night.
Searched through OnDemand of Comcast, and watched  African Queen.
What a classic!  What fun!  
Also love to see how they did special effects without computers in those days!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on June 03, 2010, 07:19:20 PM
Babi - Hi - Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence is set in a Japanese POW camp in Java.  The date is c.1942.  David Bowie is quite excellent in it.  I saw him performing live - truly a once in a lifetime experience.  In the movie David is an officer called Jack.  He is a natural leader and runs foul of the commander of the camp, played very well also by Ryuichi Sakamoto, who according to my Japanese students is just as famous in Japan as David Bowie is in the West.  The movie is not for the faint-hearted, but well worth seeing imho.  Ryuichi Sakamoto is also a musician, I forgot to add.   I haven't read the book, but intend to do so soon.  Take care, from your Antipodean friend.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 03, 2010, 09:19:49 PM
Apparently Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence is not yet out on DVD.  Netflix has some by the same director -- N. Oshima -- and show a list of some of his others that they expect to have soon, but Merry Christmas, M.   .  .  was not included.

Last night I watched an Australian film, Walkabout.  I'd heard much about it because some of our high school students read the book in English class, then saw the film.  The plot of a brother and sister lost in the Outback is not straightforward.  Parts a bit strange, almost mystical, but fantastic photography of the scenery and the natural life.

Mippy, some of those older films are so excellent.  I'd love to see African Queen again.  Casablanca is another one that can be watched over and over.  In a series of comments about it, I remember one person saying he watched Casablanca once a month.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 04, 2010, 09:10:03 AM
 Thanks, ROSE.  There were quite a few movies made about war prisoners
after WWII. Especially the Japanese camps, which were particularly awful.

   I think there is quite a bit of mysticism involved in 'walkabout', PEDLN.
 It is an aborigine form of pilgrimage, where they follow paths, unmarked to
our eyes, which were laid down originally by their clan totem animals.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on June 06, 2010, 08:37:10 PM
Pedln and Babi
If you enjoy movies about Aboriginal culture, I can recommend "The Tracker" and "Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith".. I don't think "The Tracker" was a book, but "Chant..." certainly is, because I have met the man who wrote it.  His name is Thomas Keneally.  When "Chant.." was first released it had a preview in Brisbane (c.1974), where I live, and then promptly banned.  I am glad I got to see it.  It is very confronting but an excellent depiction of aboriginal / European relations at that time. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 06, 2010, 11:17:20 PM
Tahnks, Roshanarose, for those titles.  I'm not familiar with either, but didn't Thomas Keneally alwo write Schindler's List?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 07, 2010, 12:06:32 PM
Movies & books into movies:  Last night I watched "My Sister's Keeper", originally a book by Jodi Picoult.  Wonderfully done!  A real heart breaker.  Excellent acting from all, better than I expected from Cameron Diaz (as the mother).  If you've not read it, or seen the movie, DO!   As well as I can remember the book (read a long time ago), the movie follows really well, so I don't think you need to read first, then watch.  Watching it made me want to go back and re-read.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on June 07, 2010, 10:02:36 PM
Pedln - A quick search will reveal information about Thomas Keneally.  He is quite a prolific writer.  I met him in the 70s in a country town called Armidale, New South Wales.  He is a small round man with a lovely smile and great humility.  He wrote "Schindler's Ark" which Spielberg filmed as "Schindler's List".  No idea why they changed the title.  Evidently Spielberg didn't take his Director's fee for that movie.  An interesting sideline - Keneally trained to be a priest before becoming a schoolteacher.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on June 08, 2010, 02:09:19 AM
Roshanarose:
Quote
Keneally "a small round man with a lovely smile and great  humility"

He sure is just that. I think of him as being a good tempered and good natured man. And his writing captures the essence of his subject. He was a guest on Q&A recently and was obviously flogging the latest volume of his new history of Australia. Don't know what the title is.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 08, 2010, 08:27:05 AM
 Oh, goody! There are seven Keneally books in my library.  ROSE & GUMTREE,  could you give me the titles of a couple of your favorites.
I have no idea, from the titles, what the books might be about.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on June 08, 2010, 10:11:16 AM
Thomas Keneally is a very uneven author.   I'd suggest reading all about each book before you buy one, or if it's a library book, no harm done if it's not one of his good ones.   Sorry I cannot recall which one was so disappointing to me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on June 08, 2010, 05:20:39 PM
did someone here, (or in one of the other book groups)earlier today, say they got a Kindle version of "A Proper Pursuit" by Lynn Austin, and got it "FREE".  My kindle shows a price of $9.99.  How'd you get it free?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on June 09, 2010, 05:21:46 AM
Thanks Mippy - alas, when a writer is so prolific there is always a risk of mediocrity at any given time (or book).  If any person here can name a writer who has written 20 or so books that all reach the apex of excellence, I will be glad if you can tell me who he/she is.  Our appreciation of books is necessarily subjective, and this makes things even more complicated.

Although I mentioned Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith and Schindler's Ark, I have not read either of them, but have seen them both as movies, and excellent they are.  So how about you read them and then I will try as well.  I am just about to read "Wolf Hall" by Hilary Mantel, which judging by its size will keep me out of mischief for a while.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on June 09, 2010, 08:07:51 AM
  Well, I'll see if my library has "Chant of Jimmy Blacksmith" and start from there.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 09, 2010, 08:43:45 AM
You all have really broadened my movie education, and I'm recognizing more names than I used to.  And last night I saw more than a few of them in the 1994 film Widow's Peak. Fun and relaxing for a summer night.  Starring Mia Farrow, Natasha Richardson, Joan Plowright, and Jim Broadbent.

How did that get on my queue?  I'll bet it was recommended here.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 09, 2010, 11:02:35 AM
Doesn’t this sound like fun – Mid-August Lunch – apparently not in theatres anymore, but soon to be out on DVD.  Netflix has it in “save.”

As the Italian holiday of Pranzo di Ferragosto approaches, cash-strapped Gianni (Gianni Di Gregorio) gets help from his landlord, his friend and his doctor, who offer financial relief in exchange for Gianni looking after their elderly relatives over the holiday. Four mismatched Italian mamas at the same table make for an awkward, hilarious and touching mid-August lunch in this film festival favorite from Di Gregorio, who also writes and directs.


I heard about this from the Food news I get from the Seattle Times.  Here’s the link and the recipe –

Pasta Al Forno (http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/popcornprejudiceamovieblog/2011977347_a_delicious_italian_recipe_--.html)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on June 09, 2010, 02:59:44 PM
Went to see The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (Swedish with excellent subtitles) last month, and loved it.  In order to get as much as possible of the whole book in, they had to alter some things and leave out some things;  but I thought they did a wonderful job and I loved the movie almost as much as the book.   Have pre-ordered the DVD, which I am told will be shipped on July 6.

Have read Hollywood wants to make the movies of these books, as well, and that George Clooney wants to play the male lead.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on June 09, 2010, 06:23:04 PM
Hi MaryPage. I see you found your way over here. There are a few of us that toggle back and forth between the two sites. So, welcome here too!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on June 10, 2010, 02:05:07 AM
Hi, MaryPage and everyone. I seem to have lost track of this discussion so am posting to bring it up when I check new replies. I've just watched Possession (DVD borrowed from my public library) as we're discussing the book by A.S. Byatt right now: http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?board=81.0

 Quite a few characters were left out or smooshed together or changed in other ways but I think that the film got much of the tone right and I loved Jeremy Northam and Jennifer Ehle in the roles of the Victorian poets. Gwyneth Paltrow and Aaron Eckhart were very good in the roles of the contemporary literary scholars.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on June 11, 2010, 05:39:37 PM
We've all seen Frankenstein movies, some of them pretty bad, but have you ever read the book?  It's quite different.  We're going to discuss it in July.  The prediscussion is here:

http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=1482.0 (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=1482.0)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on June 13, 2010, 07:54:31 AM
MaryPage:  I was happy to read your review of the movie The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.  I'm a loyal Stieg Larsson, or more particularly Lisbeth Salander, fan and am about to complete The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, presumably his last.  Last week while toting the conspicuously silver colored Hornet's book at Barnes & Noble a lady approached me and told me a story about the Larsson family offering Stieg's surviving, live-in, collaborator, a million dollars if she'd relinguished his PC.  She said "No dice" leading all to believe that there is a fourth manuscript stored.  This might be an urban legend but the lady was very convincing.  We'll see.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on June 13, 2010, 02:14:10 PM

Jim,

The newspapers have been reporting the fourth novel as 3/4 finished. The fight over the computer and manuscript is a bit involved. The first article is rather extensive, but it gives a lot of background on Larsson and his live-in's involvement with the novels as well as why she does not want to give it up to his family. Very interesting reading. The second is a short article about some early unpublished writings that were found.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/23/magazine/23Larsson-t.html?pagewanted=1

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/08/unpublished-manuscripts-by-stieg-larsson-are-found/
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on June 14, 2010, 10:36:18 AM
Thank you, Frybabe.  I'm reading the cited articles now.  Very interesting.  I'm an avid newspaper reader but have missed these events entiirely.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on June 17, 2010, 10:25:50 AM
If you go to the NEW YORK TIMES and search Larsson, you will find simply heaps of articles and pictures.  He was with the Love of His Life for 30 years, but, like many Swedes, they had never married.  No children.  He was not yet 50 years old!  No will.  He had no money to speak of.  So he dropped dead quite suddenly and the law allowed his father and brother to reap the rewards from these 3 as yet unpublished though accepted for publication books!  And they've made out like gangbusters!  And he rarely had anything to do with them!

All Sweden is sympathetic to her.

I loved the bit about the book store clerk who said:  "We're calling all of the books 'The Girl Who's Paying Our Wages These Months!'"

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo was great!  He titled it Men Who Hate Women.  The Girl Who Played With Fire was fantastic!  I have just completed reading The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest for the SECOND time in a week!  Super incredible book, and I am in mourning that there will be no more;  at least, not from him.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on June 30, 2010, 12:05:49 PM
 
Quote
"We're calling all of the books 'The Girl Who's Paying Our Wages These Months!'"

I love that.  Reminds me of what some call Whole Foods -- whole paycheck.

I just read an amazing article about film critic Roger Ebert.  All I can say is WOW!  This article in yesterday’s Seattle Times  – what an amazing man.  As Ann Thomas says in her introduction of his forthcoming book --

Quote
"Cooking, for him, I think in the last few years has become a very selfless act," Thomas said. "This really tells you about Roger. He doesn't stop living, doing things or being interested in things or having a good time because in a way something changes. But Roger does not get discouraged. He has such a zest for life."

Not eating, but still cooking (http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/entertainment/2012238984_apusfeafoodrogerebertcookbook1stldwritethru.html)

What is everyone watching these days?  I just found HULU for the first time and enjoyed watching the pilot of GREEK on my computer.  Believe it or not, captions are beginning to creep into some the these computer videos.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on July 01, 2010, 08:03:37 AM
Well, that's good news, PEDLN.  Maybe soon I can stop reminding my
e-mail correspondents that it's pointless to send me videos.  :)

  I seem to be having a problem will very slow response on SL this morning.  I don't know if the problem is at this end or their end.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on July 01, 2010, 11:34:40 AM
I hope things are faster for you now, Babi. I'm moving along fine.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 01, 2010, 12:43:26 PM
I've had that problem today too, Babi.  It seems OK at the moment.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on July 01, 2010, 12:58:58 PM
I have had trouble getting from one discussion, to the next, today.  Very, very slow.

Sheila
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on July 01, 2010, 01:05:29 PM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on July 01, 2010, 01:05:42 PM
There seem to be a number of Internet outages today and response time throughout the Internet is somewhat degraded. See http://www.internettrafficreport.com/namerica.htm
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on July 01, 2010, 05:29:03 PM
 I had to leave this am and come back this afternoon.  It may very well be weather interference. We are, after all, getting the outlying effects of the hurricane in Norther Mexico.  Lots of rain and thunderstorms. Seems to be working find just now.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on July 02, 2010, 01:21:25 PM
I am so excited, because a book I simply adored (though not as much as the series of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo), The Pillars of The Earth by Ken Follett, has been made into a mini-series film with some great stars.  It is made for cable TV and starts July 23 on STARZ.  I have not been subscribing to that channel, but called Comcast right away and they have switched it on for me for only $5.00 a month.

As I say, I am very excited!
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on July 02, 2010, 01:44:25 PM
It looks like it has some good actors, MaryPage. They have a website at http://www.the-pillars-of-the-earth.tv/
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on July 02, 2010, 10:19:46 PM
I got in on the middle of a movie I'd never seen on the Turner Channel -- THE LOVED ONE, a very humorous satire on the funeral industry, based on the novel by Evelyn Waugh.  It's on Netflix, so I'll watch the rest of it.  Great cast -- Robert Morse (How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying, and lately in Mad Men), Jonathan Winters, Milton Berle, James Cobern, Roddy McDowell, John Gielgud and more -- even Liberaci!

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 02, 2010, 10:46:34 PM
Goodness!  I totally forgot "The Loved One" had been made into a movie, though I read the book eons ago.  What does Liberace do?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on July 03, 2010, 12:20:23 AM
Oh, The Loved One made a great impression on me when I first read it. I don't think I've seen the film. I just found a clip from the film of Liberace as the undertaker in the funeral home at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_oymjPBjYLQ
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on July 03, 2010, 07:50:50 AM
The Namesake is on one of me cable channels this morning. I started to watch it, but I don't really care to watch TV in the morning. The book is still in one of my TBR piles. The good thing about being layed-off is that I am not spending on books to add to my TBRs so I am reducing my pile faster than I am adding for the time being.

Picked up Memoirs of a Geisha at the used book store yesterday. Seen the movie, liked it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 03, 2010, 11:31:06 AM
That clip is a real howl, Ginny.  Liberace is perfect in the part.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 04, 2010, 12:38:17 PM
The trailer looked interesting, Marcie, even without captions.  So now I’ve got The Loved One on my Netflix. I once heard a story about Liberace, and assume it’s true, but I really don’t know.  His parents were on welfare when he was growing up in Milwaukee.  After he became well-known, the city of Milwaukee sent him a bill for the welfare payments.

Over the past few days I’ve watched a British miniseries, 3 episodes – Melissa -- with Peter Barkworth, adapted from a novel by Francis Durbridge.  It runs much like a  play, going from scene to scene, as though on stage.  Melissa, the wife of an unemployed Fleet Street journalist is strangled one night, and all clues seem to point to her husband (Barkworth) who hasn’t a clue about how to confront the lies being told about him.  Quite low-key, no violence, etc.  Lots of twists and turns.

I’d never heard of Durbridge before, but he has quite a bibliography of novels and radio and TV shows, especially for his character Paul Temple, novelist and detective.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 04, 2010, 12:40:54 PM
Frybabe, re The Namesake -- both the book and film are excellent.  Memoirs of a Geisha is in my TBR pile, too.  Has been there forever.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on July 04, 2010, 08:06:50 PM
Pedln: The station replayed The Namesake later in the afternoon. By that time I was winding down, so I watched the whole thing. I did like it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on July 05, 2010, 08:26:31 AM
"The Namesake" isn't ringing any bells.  What is it about, please? 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 05, 2010, 10:53:42 AM
Babi, it's a novel by Jhumpa Lahiri about an Indian couple who emigrate to the US and start their family life here.  A wonderful story, both novel and film, about cultural and generational differences.  Lahiri is mainly a short-story writer -- Interpreter of Maladies, and I think she has a new collection out.  I think The Namesake is her only novel.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on July 06, 2010, 08:15:32 AM
Thanks, PEDLN.  Completely new name to me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on July 07, 2010, 04:45:26 PM
I didn'r realize that Jonathan Winters was in a movie!! A favorite of mine.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on July 07, 2010, 04:58:44 PM
Joan, Jonathan Winters has been in  bunch of movies.  Check his page on IMDb.
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0005565/
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on July 08, 2010, 09:13:57 PM
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, (etc) World!

One of the funniest movies ever and Winters is hysterical...........jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 16, 2010, 11:57:58 AM
I don't think I've ever seen Jonathan Winters -- I don't recognizd him on that movie site.  We lived in Puerto Rico for 10 years when he was pretty active on TV, but we had no TV.

What has everyone been watching lately?  I finally saw The Blind Side and it was every bit as good as folks said it was.  5 Netflix stars.  Did Quinton Aaron get any awards for his performance?  I thought he was amazing.  This was my first 5 star film in a long time.

Has anyone seen this new film that just came out -- The Kids Are All Right?  It'll probably be a while before the DVD comes out.

And I'm waiting for Babies.  The promotional trailer was a lot of fun, but I guess it's not the kind of film that brings in lots of box office rewards.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on July 20, 2010, 11:58:44 PM
pedln, both THE KIDS ARE ALL RIGHT and BABIES seem like interesting films. I just looked them up online. I'm definitely going to watch them on DVD.

In case you all haven't heard:
We're looking forward to three new Wallander (http://www.branaghcompendium.com/wallander.html) episodes with Kenneth Branagh in October on PBS. If you'd like a set of Mankell books (Faceless Killers, The Man Who Smiled, and The Fifth Woman) for only the cost of postage, please post in our PBS discussion (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=1300.160). Limited quantities. First come, first served.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on July 24, 2010, 02:26:09 PM
A British writer, Flora Thompson, wrote novels about two imaginery places in England in the mid-nineteenth century:  a hamlet called Lark Rise and a small town called Candleford.  The BBC has turned these into a television series, and I just purchased the first two seasons from Barnes & Noble online.  They are titled LARK RISE TO CANDLEFORD.

I can report they are quite wonderful fun.  Marvelous acting and superb costumes.  Not intellectual, but good entertainment.

The Girl Who Played With Fire has finally come to Annapolis Harbour Center and one of my daughters will take me next Thursday.  I am really looking forward to that!  Critics have praised it.  This is the Swedish version, with subtitles.  They have not begun filming the Hollywood ones as yet.  Dying to see for myself how they dealt with a lot of the stuff in the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on July 24, 2010, 09:41:59 PM
I hear it is very good, but VERY violent and graphic.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on July 25, 2010, 07:10:01 AM
I watched Lark Rise to Candleford on PBS.  It was excellent and worth getting if you haven't seen it.  Mary, did you read the books and did you like them??
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on July 25, 2010, 08:54:32 AM
 "Violent and graphic" is as good as a thumbs down for me. NO, thanks!

 Those who saw "Lark Rise...",  was it closed captioned?  It sounds like
something I would really enjoy.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on July 25, 2010, 02:31:29 PM
I didn't see Lark Rise to Candleford on PBS. I don't know if it was ever shown in my area. It does sound good. Thanks for the information about it, MaryPage and salan.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 25, 2010, 03:37:21 PM
Babi, Netflix has seasons 1 and 2 or Lark Rise to Candleford, and they have English subtitles.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on July 25, 2010, 04:07:02 PM
Babi, I think you would really enjoy Lark Rise.  I'm glad it's out on DVD as I will probably watch it again.
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on July 25, 2010, 05:58:40 PM
Lark Rise to Candleford (so named because the young heroine, Laura, leaves her home in the tiny hamlet of farmfolk called Lark Rise for a job in her majesty's post office in the growing town of Candleford, 8 miles away) is, of course, spoken in British English and does have most excellent subtitles.  You can also use your closed captioning system if you prefer.  It takes place in beautiful Oxfordshire, per the books;  but I did not notice where it was actually filmed.

No, I never read those books.  Had never even heard of them, that I can remember.  And yes, I do recommend the films.  You will recognize a lot of the actors if you watch a lot of the British stuff on PBS.

My daughter and I went to see THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE this afternoon.  We were going to wait until Thursday afternoon, but decided to do RAMONA AND BEEZUS then and go ahead to The Girl Who today.  We both adored it.  Keeps pretty close to the book, albeit they had to leave a lot of stuff out, just as they did with the first film, in order to get the main storyline told in a film of decent length.  The ending was changed somewhat, but we could both understand why and did not mind.  The difference was not substantive.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on July 26, 2010, 08:36:20 AM
 Thanks, PEDLN and MARYPAGE.  I'll add 'Lark Rising' to my Netflix queue.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 26, 2010, 08:13:22 PM
Mary Page, I'm glad to hear the good report about The Girl Who Played With Fire, although thinking about the first film in the trilogy, "adore" would probably not be how I would describe it.  But, our local Cineplex has decided to broaden its outlook and carry more foreign films, and it's coming here Aug. 20.  Probably the first foreign flick here since Pan's Labyrinth came out.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 26, 2010, 08:51:14 PM
Pedln, if you saw it, what did you think of Pan's Labyrinth?  I found it very powerful and compelling, but almost unbearably creepy.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on July 27, 2010, 08:23:09 AM
My oldest son again talked me in to reading a Stephen King book.  The Stand holds my attention but it's so lengthy I'm apprehensive it'll continue to do so.  He's a "born again" King fan, having all first edition books King's ever had published.  I read Dune last year and it was okay, but I'm not tied to any particular author.  I would find it very difficult, if not impossible, to rank favorite authors.  How does one compare Maryanne Robinson to Cormac McCarthy, both excellent writers and each entirely different?  I did see an unusually good movie last week titled Winter's Bone, starring Jennifer Lawrence.  If Lawrence doesn't get an Oscar for this performance, not to mention some great supporting performances, then the awards are a sham.  Of course, I've never been right before.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on July 27, 2010, 09:26:11 AM
I really was uncomfortable with and disliked Pan's Labyrinth.  Because of the rave critic's revues, I actually bought the DVD and viewed it that way.  Quickly gave the film to my cleaning lady, after loaning it to one of my daughters and having her wish she had not seen it, as well.

The reason we felt we "adored" The Girl Who Played With Fire is that we enjoyed having the heroine WIN in the long run, albeit she was most certainly horribly used and abused.  We, as women, enjoyed her refusal to be a victim and her determination to figure things out for herself and swat down and destroy the monsters.  You go, Girl, ----- was my strongest emotion.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on July 27, 2010, 04:24:25 PM
I felt that way too about the books.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on July 28, 2010, 12:00:02 PM
Hi, everyone. Whether or not you've read the book, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, you've likely seen a movie version related to it. We're now discussing anything about the book or film versions in our final week of discussion of FRANKENSTEIN. You're invited! http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=1513.200.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on July 30, 2010, 10:27:12 AM
PatH, I thought Pan’s Labyrinth was an excellent film, but very dark.  Yeah, kind of creepy.

Jim, thanks for the input about Winter’s Bone.  When I checked on Netflix I found it was based on a book by Daniel Woodrell – who has written a lot of novels.  Never heard of him before.  It’s interesting to come across these films made from novels and short stories that haven’t made the best seller lists.  Schindler’s List comes to mind, as does Brokeback Mountain and The Emperor's Club.

Last night I watched I Am David, with Ben Tibber and Joan Plowright, among others, also based on a novel, North to Freedom by Anne Holm.  It’s about a young boy who tries to make his way to Denmark after escaping from a communist camp in Bulgaria.  The film has an interesting approach to dialog in the many scenes where the boy is alone.  I really liked it and young Tibber did a fine job.  Has he played in many films or on TV?  This one came out in 2004, so he would be a young man by now.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on July 30, 2010, 05:27:38 PM
Pedlin:  Please let me know how you like Winter's Bone.  I, too, have never heard of the book's author but the movie will cause me to look him up.  Again at my son's insistence, my wife and I rented The Book of Eli from Netflix.  We made it to restaurant scene and I'll have to finish it alone because it's dark and futuristic, neither quality which attracts us.  Nevertheless, he sees political ramifications which I must discuss with him.  My wife gets a pass.  Denzel Washington stars and I've seen few movies with him that I didn't like.  This one appears to be among the few.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on July 31, 2010, 10:11:13 AM
I viewed The Book of Eli last eve in its entirety and must take a 180 degree turn in my opinion.  While dark and violent, it's worth watching.  For those whose viewing attention lapses at times, as mind does, there's a twist at the end but there are hints for the more astute viewer.  Both Jennifer Beals and Denzel Washington perform creditably.  Gary Oldman always plays the "bad guy" role enthusiastically.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on July 31, 2010, 01:12:55 PM
I can think of one example of Gary Oldman not being the bad guy.  He was Sirius Black in the Harry Potter movies--somewhat disreputable, but not bad.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on July 31, 2010, 03:04:55 PM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


Daughter Debi and I went to see RAMONA & BEEZUS at the moving picture show and laughed and laughed.  Don't know When we've had such a great time at a movie.  The books did not come out in time for me to read them to my children, but I and my children read them to my grandchildren and are now reading them to the great grands.  This movie takes in things from a number of the books.  You will Love it!

Oh, and the child who plays 9 years & 3 months old Ramona, how old she is in the movie, though I think of her mainly as younger than that, well, this little actress is AMAZING!  You just will not believe her facial expressions.

Go.  Enjoy!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 01, 2010, 08:21:26 AM
 "I am David" sounds very good, as does "Ramona and Beezus". Thanks for the posts, PEDLN and MARYPAGE.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on August 01, 2010, 12:17:30 PM
My son read I Am David when he was just a youngster. Now in his late forties, he still maintains it to be his favourite book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 06, 2010, 11:27:43 PM
Watched the new episode of PILLARS OF THE EARTH on television tonight, and have begun to be disappointed in the extent to which they have changed the book as I remember it.  It could be that my memory is faulty (could be? ha!), but I begin to talk back to the TV and say:  "That isn't the way it was in the book!"

Oh well.  It is still a good yarn and very well acted.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on August 07, 2010, 12:34:33 AM
MaryPage, I'm enjoying the TV version. I haven't read the book so can't make the comparisons.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 07, 2010, 12:51:43 PM
We're just home from Iceland and England.  Drove around rural England, staying in B&Bs, etc.  Loved it, of course.  My husband's favorite, and in  my top 2-3, was Old Sarum - absolutely fantastic!  We don't get STARZ, but will need to reread Pillars, and get the films when they come out on NetFlix.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on August 07, 2010, 01:42:17 PM
Wow, Maryz, that sounds like a wonderful trip! You can watch the episodes of PILLARS OF THE EARTH online at http://www.starz.com/pillars
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on August 07, 2010, 01:57:59 PM
Marcie,  a Thousand Thank Yous for the link to the Starz website.  I have bookmarked it and will be watching Episode One tonight - instead of playing endless games of on-line Solitaire.
How delightful!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on August 07, 2010, 02:09:43 PM
I can't play Solitaire online or I'll get addicted! Glad you found something else to do, callie :-)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on August 07, 2010, 03:28:57 PM
Maryz, I've always wanted to see Iceland.  Was it good?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 07, 2010, 04:26:24 PM
Pat, it was terrific.  We were on an alumni tour with Gohagan on a French ship (200+ passengers) - all very well run.  The scenery is lovely, with lots to learn about the people, history, and geology/volcanoes, etc.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 08, 2010, 08:12:05 AM
 It's not just solitaire, you know.  There's Minesweeper and Scrabble, too.   ::)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 08, 2010, 09:07:26 AM
Mahjong and Bookworm
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on August 08, 2010, 12:02:22 PM
FreeCell and Spider Solitaire!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 08, 2010, 12:08:29 PM
MaryZ, what a great travel combination -- England and Iceland.  It sounds like a wonderful trip. 

Have you read any books by Icelandic author Arnaldur Indridason?  Apparently his Jar City is in film (on demand from Amazon) but not yet in DVD format.  I don't know if it's in English or in Icelandic with subtitles.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on August 08, 2010, 02:38:44 PM
Babi, Frybabe and TomeReader, Yes there certainly are other games on the computer.  I thought it prudent to just mention one rather than confessing my "goal" of playing all 1million+ games of Free Cell in sequence (I will have to live well past the century mark to do so).  :D   ;D

Maryz, your tour of Iceland sounds fascinating.  What did you see/learn about the most recent volcanic eruption?
I have also seen the original Old Sarum, as well as other ancient sites in the British Isles.  I will never forget my first glimpse of The Tower of London - a view of Traitor's Gate from the river (on a supper cruise) - or placing my hand on The Rock of Cashel tower in Ireland and looking out over the countryside.  What a thrilling chill to realize I was seeing the same view that real people saw all those many centuries ago.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 08, 2010, 02:43:36 PM
Callie, there was very little damage in Iceland itself from the recent volcano.  They are a lot more worried about the much larger volcano nearby, Katla, and feel it will erupt in the not-too-distant future.  They have incredibly sophisticated technology and sensors to make predictions - in the near time, but not very far into the future.  The Icelanders are beginning to use their geothermal features to produce heating and electicity and have some very advanced equipment.  We did get to see the island of Surtsey (formed in the 1960s from an undersea eruption) and the volcano on Haimey which erupted in 1973.  Our trip expert was a geologist/vulcanologist who was very interesting and knowledgeable.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on August 08, 2010, 03:20:10 PM
Maryz, How interesting to have had a geologist/vulcanologist for a guide.  Thank you for sharing with me/us.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on August 08, 2010, 05:57:57 PM
MaryZ: that sounds like a fascinating trip.

I'm not sure that I haven't already played a million games of Freecell. I'm scared to look. I'm absolutely addicted to that game.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 08, 2010, 06:59:40 PM
Has anyone tried the solitaire game called American Toad?  No skill required to speak of, though memory helps, but quite addictive and good fun.  I play it a LOT on my Nintendo DS Lite (made for old folk like most of us) while watching the news.  I find I can do both without missing a thing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 09, 2010, 09:47:45 AM
I play FreeCell for medical reasons.  My knee locks up when I sit at the computer, engrossed in what I'm doing.  Then when it's time to get up, whoops, that doesn't feel so good.  So then I play FreeCell while stretching the leg.  Works every time.    :-*
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on August 09, 2010, 09:49:33 AM
Pedln, I thought I was the only one whose knees went funny when sitting at the computer.  ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on August 09, 2010, 03:42:24 PM
Pedlin: do you take a small drink for medicinal reasons, too? ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on August 11, 2010, 10:19:02 PM
We have just lost Patricia Neal.  In addition to being a good actress, she did a heroic job of recovering from a massive stroke and resuming her career.  I've got to admit that (sci-fi fan that I am) I think of her mostly for her role in "The Day the Earth Stood Still".  I think she thought of it as slumming, but she did a good job, and it's classic sci-fi.  Maybe I'll re-watch it (I own it) in memoriam.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 11, 2010, 11:27:52 PM
A loss to the acting world indeed.  I first saw Patricia Neal in "Hud".  I was quite young at the time but I loved that movie.  I may be wrong but wasn't she married to Roald Dahl?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on August 11, 2010, 11:56:20 PM
Yes, roshanarose, she was married to Dahl.  He helped her recover from the stroke, but in other ways was not a good husband, and they eventually divorced.  I've never bothered to try figuring out the rights and wrongs of that one.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 12, 2010, 08:41:05 AM
Quote
I've never bothered to try figuring out the rights and wrongs of that one.

  A hopeless and thankless task in any marriage, PAT.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 13, 2010, 09:29:34 AM
Reading a blog written by Ken Follett, author of THE PILLARS OF THE EARTH, on the STARZ website this morning, I was tickled to note this:
"Brother Cuthbert is Kingsbridge Priory's cellarer. He holds an important position in the monastic hierarchy. He's in charge of the community's food and drink, storing, organising and obtaining it, whether from outside - in which case he's responsible for getting best value from every farthing - or produced by the monks themselves. Kingsbridge isn't very successful in this respect, and sub-prior Remigius has no interest in improving the situation. Cuthbert, trying to perform his duties, would have been all too aware of that. He is encouraged by Philip who has already turned one run-down monastery into a going concern and hopefully will do so again.
By the way, Brother Cuthbert is played wonderfully by John Pielmeier.  John is not only a terrific actor; he wrote the television adaptation, all eight hours of it, from my novel!"
.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 13, 2010, 05:56:32 PM
WOW! I am impressed.  I've never heard of John Pielmeier before, but
believe me I sat up and took notice now.  We don't get STARZ, but I'm
looking hopefully for it's appearance in Netflix.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on August 15, 2010, 12:39:14 PM
Thanks for pointing out the info about John Pielmeier. His supporting role in PILLARS  has stood out to me. His website is interesting: http://johnpielmeier.com/common/11082/default.cfm?clientID=11082
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 17, 2010, 01:13:34 PM
Rooney Mara (was in Nightmare on Elm St.) will be Lisbeth Salander and Daniel Craig (James Bond) will be Michael Blomkvist in the movie of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo that Hollywood is about to film.

I do not know anything about her, but just looked her up in Google Image, and she does look the part.  Now, if she can ACT the part, this will be the role of a Lifetime for her!

He will probably be great in the part.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 18, 2010, 09:38:16 AM
Rooney Mara and Daniel Craig are not household words for me, so I really can't comment on those choices.  But what I don't understand is why Hollywood feels it necessary to duplicate what the Swedes have already done.  They want it less bloody, less sexual?  Ha ha.  If I were to play the female lead I'd sure be thinking what a tough act to follow.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 18, 2010, 01:36:49 PM
I agree with you;  in my head forever Lisbeth Salander looks exactly like the Swedish actress who played her. 

On the other hand, the Hollywood version will be seen by many many millions more people, so this Rooney Mara will wind up most folks vision of Lisbeth.  That is why I hope she is up to filling the jeans & boots.  I cannot TELL you how many people I have spoken with who adored the books, yet refuse to see the films already out!  The lament most often is:  "I don't know the language and I hate subtitles!"

I don't know a word of Swedish, really;  though I did find out from the movie that we have a lot of words in common, or nearly so.  The thing is, if you have read the books, you know PRECISELY what is going on in every scene, AND the subtitles are quite wonderful.

Bottom line, I was just too curious NOT to see the movies.  For the same reason, I will pay my money and see the Hollywood versions, and, again I am just frightfully curious to see what they do with them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on August 18, 2010, 03:00:10 PM
I admit I hesitate to see the movie, because I understand it's very graphic, and I'm squeamish. But I think I'df rather see that than the Hollywood version.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 18, 2010, 11:29:19 PM
There was some conversation about Michener a week or so ago on one of the discussions.  Did anybody else watch the PBS Live at Lincoln Center broadcast of the current Broadway revival of South Pacific?

It's an incredible production, and what a treat to see it uncut and without interruption (except for intermission).  Be sure to catch it if you can.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on August 19, 2010, 07:02:10 AM
Yes, Mary, I plan to watch South Pacific, and did remember to record it last night!
It might indeed be better than the older movie version!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 19, 2010, 11:03:35 AM
JoanK, the movies of The Girl Who are very graphic, but if you have read the books before you see the movies, you know how they end and you know that the good gal (and guy) triumph over the evil ones, which is one reason why, in this age of nasty usually winning, these books are so popular.  I think of them in terms of the old Grimm fairy tales.  Princess (modern style, mind, with tattoos and piercings), prince, evil out to do them in, but evil is outwitted and the prince and the princess retire to the turreted castle flying pennants on the hilltop (read $25,000,000.00 apartment in Stockholm.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 21, 2010, 10:13:05 AM
Wowee -- today I'm going to the real movies.  The Girl Who Played with Fire is in town.  I don't know why they never had "Tatoo" but they didn't.  The teenagers don't like that kind of film, I guess.  Maybe they don't want to read subtitles.  (It's hard to read and text at the same time   ;)  )   Eat, Pray, Love is on at the same time, so I'll offer that up to my friends as an alternative for them.  I haven't told them "Fire" would be bloody and sexy.  We'll see.

Last night I watched a really terrific Netflix film -- French.  I've Loved You So Long (2008) with Kristin Scott Thomas.  She's bilingual.  Really fantastic.  It's about two sisters, the elder (Scott Thomas) has just been released from prison, after serving 15 years for murder, and the other has brought her to her home and family.  The format, with so many small scenes that just dissolve into each other is fascinating.  The whole thing is so well done.  No violence, no sex, just a true exploration of relationships.  For Netflix -- 5 stars.

I had't a clue what Scott Thomas had played in before, but two that I'd seen with her were The Horse Whisperer and Tell No One -- a French mystery, based on the book by Harlan Cobden.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on August 21, 2010, 11:18:22 AM
I saw "Eat Pray Love" this past week.  Nice entertainment for a summer afternoon.  I didn't realize it's based on Elizabeth Gilbreath's memoir; apparently, she really did these things.

Reviewers have praised the photography and the acting - but really panned the movie.  They probably don't read "fluff stuff" like Kristen Hannah, Debbie Macomber, etc.  :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 21, 2010, 11:41:02 AM
ohhhhhhh, Pedln. Tell No One was a book I could not put down. I hope they play it here (with subtitles, of course).

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 21, 2010, 11:49:03 AM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


Pedln, I will never forget Scott Thomas in THE ENGLISH PATIENT.  Wow!

You will love the movie The Girl Who Played With Fire.  They changed the end a little bit, but, substance-wise, it does not make all that much difference.  Really, no difference.  My daughter and I were disappointed they never let her mutter to herself, on the 2 occasions portrayed in the movie where she did it in the book, "Kalle ****ing Blomquist."  Debi and I both got a kick out of her doing that, and no, we are NOT potty mouths, but she was a woman-in-love feeling rejected by this man and trying to escape having him in her life;  so every time he pops up and comes, as it were, to her rescue, she mutters that until, really, it got to be funny.  I think Steig Larsson truly captured what her mind processes would have been, and I think he had a great sense of humor.

I think it is Elizabeth Gilbert's memoire, Eat, Pray, Love.  And I have read all of Harlan Coben's books and seen all of the movies made from them so far.  Expect there will be more!

Frybabe, TELL NO ONE came out a couple of years ago or more.  You will need to rent the DVD or something, as I very much doubt it will be back in the theatres.  I loved the book, as well.  The movie was extremely well done, but, as always, changed a bit.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on August 21, 2010, 12:55:38 PM
Kristin Scott Thomas is fabulous in almost anything she appears in.  Obviously she is very selective of her roles. Mary Page, the English Patient was fantastic!  One movie I enjoyed MORE than the book. 
And another movie she was in, probably not your type of thing, with Harrison Ford, "Random Hearts".  She did a great job in that also, as did Harrison Ford.  (Strange not to see him in something that was not an action movie, like Raiders...)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 21, 2010, 08:41:49 PM
pedln - I am a Kristin Scott Thomas fan too.  I came out of the movie "I've Loved You for So Long" in tears.  Very emotional for me as it reflected some events I had experienced.  I saw KST recently in "Nowhere Boy" a movie about John Lennon as a boy - before he became famous.  KST plays his aunt.  She is wonderful in it.  But my all-time favourite is "The English Patient" in which she co-starred with my all time favourite man, Ralph Fiennes.  I was in Heaven seeing them act together.   

Last night I bought a newly purchased video "The Lion in Winter", a movie I had loved as a youngster.  Sublime acting by Katherine Hepburn as Eleanor of Aquitane, although I think Peter O'Toole overacted just a wee bit.  I had been on the trail of this DVD for a while.  It was worth waiting for. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 21, 2010, 08:43:59 PM
Coincidence - I think we must all have posted about KST and "The English Patient at the same time. :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on August 22, 2010, 02:22:31 AM
Kristin Scott Thomas seems to be a universal favourite - she crops up  unexpectedly at times. Another film she was in was Four Weddings and a Funeral with Hugh Grant et al. I liked her in English Patient but preferred the book to the film.

Roshanarose - I loved that Lion in Winter too. Didn't think O'Toole overacted though it's been quite a while since I saw it. Hepburn was superb.

Watched Da Vinci Code on TV - what a hoot.

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 22, 2010, 10:39:24 AM
  I read "Eat, Pray, Love" and was curious as to what the movie might be
like. The book I wouldn't call 'fluff'. It was a very personal exploration
by a woman determined to find stable ground for her life. It took her down
some surprising..to me..roads. Not something I really expect Hollywood to
do well, tho' they can when they try.

  ROSE, it seems to me Peter O'Toole has always come across as somewhat
larger than life.  In some roles that works beautifully; in others it doesn't do as well.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on August 22, 2010, 12:39:05 PM
I think Peter OToole's best role was as Lawrence of Arabia - he was also good in comedy and rather suave in How to Steal a Million with Audrey Hepburn
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on August 22, 2010, 01:07:40 PM
Don't forget Lord Jim. I only watched that movie once. At the time, I thought the movie a bit "dark" and I didn't like the ending. Never read the book.

Oh, and Becket.


Having read Lawrence's Seven Pillars of Wisdon, The Mint, and his letters to Robert Graves, I would have to say that O'Toole did a suberb job of getting the essence of the man. It didn't hurt to have a suberb cast, exceptional direction, and that scenery.

I never cared for O'Toole's comedies though.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on August 22, 2010, 01:59:16 PM
Loved "Becket"  !!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 22, 2010, 02:38:16 PM
Me, too!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 22, 2010, 10:23:48 PM
I sat up to way past the witching hour last week to watch again "Anne of the Thousand Days".  Genevieve Bujold convinced me that she WAS Anne Boleyn and no other actor since has convinced me otherwise.  Richard Burton as Henry was also convincing.  Definitely an oldie but a goodie.  Now on the trail of "Becket".  Magnificent movie.

Somehow our own Eric Bana did not convey Henry VIII's complexity to me, although I enjoyed Natalie Portman as Anne in "The Other Boleyn Girl".  I always see Eric kitted out as Hector from "Troy".  He was very desirable in that film.  I loved the way he wore his hair.  Quite authentic, according to the Homeric styles of that age.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 23, 2010, 06:25:13 AM
It was Scarlett Johansson who most impressed me in The Other Boleyn Girl.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 24, 2010, 08:23:21 AM
 I don't recall if I saw 'Beckett', though it's definitely the kind of movie I
would have tried to see.  And 'Hector' was my favorite person in 'Troy'.
I hated it when he died; his character was the best of the lot.
  I think I'll go see if Netflix has Beckett.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 24, 2010, 08:11:25 PM
babi - Eric Bana is the new Anthony Quinn for movies.  His colouring and looks mean he can play anything from an Ancient Trojan to an agent for Mossad.  His ancestry is actually Croatian / German.  He started out on Australian TV as a comedian. He was good at that too.  He also played a famous Australian criminal, he put on about 15 kilos for the role and had a permanent five o'clock shadow and tats.  He was so convincing.  A very versatile actor.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on August 24, 2010, 10:48:57 PM
I saw Eat, Pray and Love this afternoon.  I'd read the book (I think) a number of years ago, but honestly don't remember it.  I did like the movie, though - Julia Roberts and Javier Bardem...what's not to like?!?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 25, 2010, 08:55:39 AM
 I love finding a truly versatile actor, ROSE.  They are convincing, no matter what they undertake.
 Russell Crowe seems to be another who can adapt convincingly to any role.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on August 25, 2010, 03:14:18 PM
Russell Crowe was pretty good as Jack Aubrey in "Master and Commander". Not perfect, but with a book character that has as many devoted fans as that one does, it's impossible to please everyone. It's like trying to play Miss Marple.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 25, 2010, 09:46:37 PM
Russell's first big movie role in Australia was as a white supremacist/Nazi lover called Hendo.  It is evidently the movie that brought him to the attention of Sharon Stone.  He went to Hollywood at her bidding and became a star.  The movie I mentioned above is called "Romper Stomper" and Russell's acting ability is more than evident.  Warning:  if you want to see the movie be prepared for extreme violence and very adult themes.  Russell is so convincing it is a bit scary.   
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on August 26, 2010, 03:47:13 AM
Yes, I remember Romper Stomper - it took me by surprise but I was glad to have seen it - my son was 'gob-smacked' to know we saw it - I think he thought we were a bit too 'young'  Crowe was brilliant - but then he often  almost always is and he has a wide range - Jack Aubrey has been mentioned but think of  the mathematician John Nash in A Brilliant Mind - then there's the reporter in State of Play - Gladiator Robin Hood and one of his early ones The Sum of Us where he played the gay son of true blue Aussie character played by Jack Thompson.

Just for the record Russell Crowe is only Australian by adoption - he was born in New Zealand. He's football mad and I think he still owns one of the Sydney rugby clubs which he took from down and out (in every way) to near top of the ladder. He did it with psychology and money.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 26, 2010, 07:34:24 AM
Gum - In a "Brilliant Mind", Russell is, well, brilliant.  It is my favourite movie of his.  The football team he bought with financial support from Holmes a Court is the Rabbitohs.  I am not a fan of Australian football codes, I much prefer soccer.  Gum - I hope your eyes are working better for you.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on August 26, 2010, 03:11:40 PM
I posted this in "the library" site, tho't some of you might like it also:

Steph, you mention our "teen-age reading," the first tho'ts that come to mind EVERY time i think of my teen-age reading was that i got hooked on sev'l fiction books w/ stories around Josephine and Napoleon. I guess because there were a couple of movies about them around that time (50's).

In fact, much of my reading came to books i read after seeing a movie - Battle Cry, Caine Mutiny, Man With the Golden Arm, some Mitchner books, and then of course, i would read other books by the same authors - Marjorie Morningstar and other Herman Woulk books, Frank Yerby books, Irving Stone books, Costain, John O'Hara (from the terrace - another great Paul Newman drama), etc. etc......there seem to be far fewer movies produced from popular fiction these days - or am i just not paying attention as closely? ...............jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 26, 2010, 07:41:04 PM
Mistake alert:  Sorry all.  In my last post I meant "Beautiful Mind".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on August 27, 2010, 03:15:50 AM
Roshanarose That's OK  - we knew what you meant.

Thanks for asking about my eye problem. It's improving but treatment is to continue for several more weeks. My ophthalmology guy and I are joined at the hip for the present.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Dana on August 28, 2010, 10:53:10 AM
Just been reading thru these --don't often because I find peoples' opinions are SO individual that unless you know the person what they think means nothing in terms of what you might think--same goes for all these individual reviews for anything from cars to hairspray on the internet.  ANYWAY, case in point....I agree Peter O'Toole pretty much always overacts ( but SO handsome when young) but so does Katherine Hepburn!!  Can't watch the woman as I always feel she's such a phoney, sends shivers up my spine.  Yet, obviously so many people think she's great.
I agree about the Swedish movie of Girl with the dragon tattoo--good movie.  Am very slowly reading book 2, trying to savour it and not finish too soon--difficult, but I reward myself with a chapter (or so) a day....nuts....
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on August 28, 2010, 03:32:45 PM
The movie "The Time Traveler's Wife" is on HBO tonight - 7:00 - 9:00 Central Daylight Time. 

I've read the book and will be interested in seeing how the movie handles the "back and forthing" of the book plot.

Last night, I watched "The Heiress" with Olivia deHaviland and Montgomery Clift.  I'm sure I've seen it before but this time, I was truly aware of how she even changed the pitch of her voice after M.C. deserted her.  Very fine acting, IMO.  No wonder she won an Academy Award.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 29, 2010, 10:46:44 AM
I hope you and your opthalmology guy are compatible, GUM.  8)

 I can't agree about Katherine Hepburn, DANA. I can't think of a single
instance of what I would consider overacting. Are you aware she suffered
from Parkinson's during the last years of her career? It caused her
movements to be tremulous, and she wore high collars to conceal her
neck support, but she continued to act. I thought she was terrific.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on August 29, 2010, 02:27:46 PM
THE HEIRESS was one of my all-time favorite films.

I never cared much for Kathryn Hepburn's films.  The only one I liked was AFRICAN QUEEN.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 30, 2010, 09:20:00 AM
 Did either of you see the Katherine Hepburn-Spencer Tracy films?  I don't
think I missed a one.  They are classics.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on August 30, 2010, 09:51:36 AM
Upon reacquainting myself with Katherine Hepburn in "The Lion in Winter" what stood out for me with her acting was her eyes.  Her skin so luminous, her eyes reflecting hatred and passion in equal measure during her dialogues with Henry.  One moment her eyes were those of a panther ready to pounce and devour; the next her eyes were those of a smitten maiden as she remembered her love and lust for Henry.  I had seen The Lion in Winter when I was relatively young and inexperienced.  As an older woman I could appreciate her courage, her passion and ultimately her helplessness in the role of Eleanor of Aquitane.  Not easily forgotten. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on August 30, 2010, 11:06:54 AM
I very much enjoyed all of the Heburn-Tracy films. I think that they were equally matched in all respects.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on August 30, 2010, 12:24:17 PM
Oh, I forgot how good Hepburn was in Lion in Winter.  I just didn't care much for her comedies including the ones with Spencer Tracy.  I preferrered both of them in dramas.  About the only Tracy film I liked was Judment at Nuremberg.

Guess my taste in comedy was more the Marx Brothers kind, and later, Woody Allen.  Tried to think of some of the other older comedies I really liked and could only think of Born Yesterday, Young Frankenstein, Dr. Strangelove, and Blazing Saddles.  I didn't care for Charlie Chaplan but liked Jack Benny's films.

Oh well, be a boring world, as they say, if everyone like the same stuff.

Saw the last hour of the Emmy Awards.  The only program I'd seen that won an award was Mad Men. 

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on August 30, 2010, 01:29:38 PM
I think the Hepburn Tracy comedies show their age these days. Spencer was always Spencer but I did like them in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner and Tracy was brilliant in Inherit the Wind with Frederic March - another of my favourite all time actors
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on August 30, 2010, 02:16:24 PM

I am glad that someone mentioned the Emmys of last night. I think that I have not seen a single one that won.  Seems like HBO puts on the best,and I am not registered for HBO.  I thought the emcee was, to say the least, NOT entertaining.  Your opinions, please.
JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on August 30, 2010, 03:28:05 PM
Did Hepburn have Parkinsons? I saw an interview with her when she was older. Her head was shaking badly. The interviewer was staring at her, but didn't say anything. She looked at him and said "Don't worry: it's not going to fall off."

She went on to say that it wasn't Parkinsons. I don't know if that's true or not.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 30, 2010, 03:30:55 PM
The only regular show that I EVER watch is THE CLOSER on TNT.  At least, I think it is TNT.  I am not very good at all these initials, and do not keep my TV Guide here in my den/computer room.

I am nutz about Kyra Sedgewick, which is why I started watching THE CLOSER 5 years ago, and got hooked on the fun & crazy murders.  For those who do not know, Kyra, one of Hollywood's most underrated yet best actresses, married to Kevin Baker, and who looks like she could be related to Julia Roberts, whose sister she played once in a regular film, plays the Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department Major Crimes (i.e. murders) Unit, and she is famous for managing to "close" every case, thus the name she has earned:  "The Closer."  It is a highly addictive series, and I have watched every episode and purchased every season on DVD so as to see them again and again.

Well, I was watching Masterpiece Murder Theatre on PBS last night, a Lewis murder with great actors in it, when the phone next to my easy chair rang and I was really annoyed.  Saw it was my Missouri daughter, so picked it up.  She knew exactly where I would be on my telly, so she ever so quickly raced through:  "Kyra Sedgewick just won an Emmy for The Closer."  So I switched over just long enough to hear her acceptance speech and then back to my own show.

If you have, indeed, never seen THE CLOSER, you have missed a lot of fun.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on August 30, 2010, 04:57:28 PM
Kyra is married to Kevin Bacon.

If any of you have never seen "Temple Grandin", do try to find it on Netflix.  I watched it on HBO, and the two female leads deserved their awards.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on August 30, 2010, 04:57:29 PM
I watch "The Closer" every week. I'm glad she won an Emmy!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on August 30, 2010, 05:14:12 PM
Joyous said, "I think that I have not seen a single one that won.  Seems like HBO puts on the best,and I am not registered for HBO.  I thought the emcee was, to say the least, NOT entertaining.  Your opinions, please."
 
I didn't watch long enough to have an opinion on the emcee.  Those shows are usually pretty boring, especially since I don't watch much TV.  I just read the newspaper to find the winners.

But you can get all the shows on Netflix.  I have a couple I want to get -- All Pacino in "You Don't Know Jack" (about Jack Kevorkian), The Closer, Breaking Bad, and Hamlet.  I do watch Mad Men -- fascinated with it.  My one and only  crime show I watch and really like didn't even get nominated -- NCIS-- I love the subtle humor, and the acting is really good, especially David McCallum who plays the medical examiner and starred in "The Man from Uncle" series in 1964..he's an old man now (my age).   

Marj

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on August 30, 2010, 08:12:39 PM
JoanK, it's not Parkinson's.  I saw an article recently (Dr. Gott) -- I think it's called tremor something. Two people from my church have it or something similar. One, a woman, her head shakes frequently.  The other, a man, it's only in his hands.  But you should see him carry two cups of coffee, not spilling a drop.  Unbelievable.

MaryPage, where in Missouri does  your daughter live?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on August 31, 2010, 01:52:59 AM
Tomereader, I too watched the film about Temple Grandin and thought it was amazing. See more about Temple at http://www.templegrandin.com/
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on August 31, 2010, 09:02:51 AM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


You and my son would have a great time talking movies, MARJ. He is a
Monty Python fan, too, and has a great deal of the dialogue from those
movies memorized.  I don't care much for them myself. I guess I like my
humor a bit more subtle.  As for David McCallum, I've always loved him!

 JOAN, I don't believe Hepburn talked about her illness or ever said just
what it was. She was a very private woman. The general consensus, based on her visible symptoms, was that it was Parkinsons.

  Thanks for the tip, MARYPAGE. TV is rather slow this time of year; I'd
be glad to find another interesting show to watch.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on August 31, 2010, 02:47:42 PM
Kevin Bacon it is!  My Bad!

My Missouri daughter lives in Kansas City.  Actually, her mailing address is to Platte City, which is a suburb of KC.  She teaches in what I believe is called the Park City school system;  again, a suburb of KC.  I get very confused.  One of her daughters lives in North Kansas City, according to the Post Office, and one lives in St. Louis.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 04, 2010, 06:57:57 PM
Oh dear, I think I need to go to remedial actor class. There are so many actors/actresses mentioned here that I don't know.  Now Russell Crowe I recognize the name, but wouldn't know him if I saw him on the street.  David McWho?  Kevin Bacon? 

Now if you said Anthony Hopkins .    .   .     . or Anne Bancroft   .    .   .  The other night I was checking to see if my DVD player was working okay, and just stuck in 84 Charing Cross Rd to test it.  Hadn't seen it in years, but got so caught up in it I just had to watch the whole thing -- at 10 pm, which I never do.  Soooo good.   That's one DVD I'm glad I bought.

And one I'm glad I didn't buy -- just rented from Netflix -- Brooklyn's Finest.  Horrible film, very bloody, language, nudity +, I don't know why I watched the whole thing.  Not even a good plot.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on September 04, 2010, 08:02:16 PM
pedln, you've hit one of my very favorites!  84 Charing Cross Road.  I own it, too.  That was the first book I looked for when I got my Kindle, but it's not there yet.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 05, 2010, 02:27:52 PM
Ann Bancroft! i watched The Graduate last night - how much we all have changed and, of course, dear Ann is deceased. What a funny movie...........was it a book? .................jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on September 05, 2010, 03:17:11 PM
The Graduate was based on a book by Charles Webb who has led quite an interesting life. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Webb_%28author%29
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 05, 2010, 03:44:45 PM
Thanks again Marcie - i just thanked you for the medieval clothing site in "The Library" - ...........you're my reference librarian today...........lol....

If this is accurate, it is Wikipedia where anyone can post anything,  i have to back off of some of my family members who i think are eccentric, these two/three have them beat by miles.

He declined an inheritance from his father, a wealthy doctor [1].

As of 2006, Webb has been with his long-term partner Eve for more than 40 years. Eve shaves her head and calls herself "Fred" in solidarity with a Californian support group called Fred, for men who have low self-esteem [2]. Fred is an artist and her work includes illustrations for Webb's 2002 novel New Cardiff. The couple have two sons, one of whom is now a performance artist who once cooked and ate a copy of The Graduate with cranberry sauce [3].

The Webbs removed their children from school so that they could tutor them at home. This was an illegal act in California at the time, and to evade the authorities they fled the state; at one point they managed a nudist camp in New Jersey. They also divorced - accounts vary as to why (it was not due to personal differences), either in protest against the institution of marriage [4] or against the US's lack of marriage rights for gays [5]. They sold their wedding presents back to their guests and having given away four houses in succession lived on the breadline, taking menial jobs as cleaners, cooks and fruit-pickers, working at K-Mart and living in a shack [6]. They currently live in Hove, East Sussex.

..jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on September 05, 2010, 03:47:37 PM
You are very welcome. I am often intrigued by other participants' questions and want to find the answer for myself too :-)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 05, 2010, 03:52:45 PM
I was modifying my response while you were posting - sorry i missed that............jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on September 05, 2010, 04:17:00 PM
:-)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 06, 2010, 01:03:06 AM
Sounds like they marched to different drummers.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 06, 2010, 08:29:47 AM
 Sounds to me like they would have refused to march to their own
drummers.  :o
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on September 06, 2010, 09:57:15 AM
I just loved the movie The Graduate.  I remember seeing it in the theater about 7 or 8 times after it first came out.  I took my girlfriends, my boyfriend, and my two young sons to see it.  After seeing it, my son, about 11 years old, said "He (Dustin Hoffman's character) is just like me."  I remember thinking,"Uh oh, what have I done?"  Then he said, "He asks lots of questions just like me."  Great movie.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on September 06, 2010, 10:02:01 AM
I'm not a horror movie fan and I usually find so-called frightening movies boring.  However, I recently saw The Last Exorcism, having chose it because it happened to fit my schedule on that particular afternoon and a sparsely attended movie in an air conditioned theater was very appealing.  This is a well made movie with a believable plot that I found disturbing and frightening because I could foresee these events occurring.  The setting is the backwoods of Louisiana, near Baton Rouge,  If you've seen it or plan to, please comment.  The title alone would usually turn me off but this movie was exceptional.   
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on September 06, 2010, 12:44:39 PM
JimNT, you're making a good case for my seeing it.  If I do, I'll comment.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on September 06, 2010, 03:07:06 PM
I don't think it was a book, but if you get a chance, go see "Get Low".  We've just gotten home from the theater, and it's terrific.  Robert Duvall, Bill Murray, Sissy Spacek, Gerald McRaney, Lucas Black, Bill Cobb. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on September 06, 2010, 06:11:42 PM

JimNt: I will certainly have to look up that movie as I live in Louisiana---Baton Rouge-----and never heard of it.

JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 06, 2010, 09:47:26 PM
Jim : I read about that movie just yesterday in the New York Times online.  It got a good review and I am looking forward to seeing it.  One of the most interesting "horror" movies I have seen recently is "Let The Right One In", book is good too.

It might seem a bit odd that someone living in Australia should read NYT online, but when I was in NYC some years ago I bought the paper to read and loved the quality of the journalism.  Much better than here.  Later today we should finally know who our Prime Minister is to be.  The final decision is up to three Independents. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 07, 2010, 08:07:09 AM
 What is "Get Low" about, MARY?  I've heard nothing about it.  The cast
certainly rates attention.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on September 07, 2010, 10:00:29 AM
Babi, it's based on a legend/real story about an old hermit in the 1930s in TN who wants to have his funeral before he dies, so he can hear what people have been saying about him.  Here's the link to IMDb..
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1194263/
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 07, 2010, 11:58:44 PM
One up for the girls!  Australia has its first female Prime Minister.  I am happy.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 08, 2010, 08:12:53 AM
 I've heard that, MARY, but always assumed it was just a story or joke. 

   Good luck to your new prime minister, ROSE.  She's won a tough job.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 09, 2010, 02:08:30 AM
True Babi!  She is cool under pressure and can out argue the boys in the Senate, no problem.  A little bit of skullduggery (a polite term for backstabbing) preceded her becoming PM.  The plot could have come straight out of Suetonius and the Julio-Claudians. 

A bit like Mrs Thatcher who was always charming and graceful under pressure (splutter, splutter) Ms Gillard is quite the lady, and even took elocution lessons in order to rid herself of her VERY Strine accent.  Of course, Gumtree, and I have impeccable diction.

Pedln - I love Anthony Hopkins too.  Love his icy eyes and his, guess what, diction.  Did you or anyone else see "The Oldest Indian"?  Anthony was just gorgeous in it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on September 09, 2010, 03:19:58 AM
:Roshanarose: I'd like our new PM a lot better if she were on the other side of politics. She's totally ruthless - the backstabbing of Rudd was truly foul play.

I have to say that my diction is fine - and too bad if there is an Aussie twang - I'm an Aussie!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on September 09, 2010, 08:20:10 AM
I stumbled upon "The Oldest Indian" by accident.  It was a great movie and I don't know why it is not better known!
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 09, 2010, 09:03:45 AM
I love the Aussie twang, GUM!  Love the English accent, too. I think
regional accents add to the 'flavor' of a conversation. The only one
I find hard to bear is a high-keyed, nasal voice. It tends to scrape
the nerves.
  I'll have to look up "The Oldest Indian" on Netflix. Sounds good.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on September 09, 2010, 10:47:16 AM
I think it is The World's FASTEST Indian. I just looked it up. It sounds interesting. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World%27s_Fastest_Indian
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on September 09, 2010, 11:14:06 AM
I'm not sure what it's called but its a good film and Anthony Hopkins does the part well. DH has the book somewhere around but I didn't read it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 09, 2010, 04:36:55 PM
While looking up "The World's Fastest Indian" on Netflix I discovered that Anthony Hopkins had made the movie of one of my favorite books, "84 Charing Cross Road".  Anne Bancroft and Judi Dench are in the movie, also.  I don't think you can find a better cast than that so I'm excited to have it get here as quickly as possible.  Bless whoever dreamed up Netflix!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on September 09, 2010, 04:48:02 PM
Phyll, as I've said before, 84 Charing Cross Road is one of my very favorites - book and movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 09, 2010, 10:22:45 PM
Gum - Don't worry mate, I'm proud to be an Australian too.

Freudian slip or something - perhaps I was getting it mixed up with the rock opera "The Oldest (and Silliest) Australian" with yours truly as the star.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 10, 2010, 08:22:56 PM
 Well, I couldn't find "The World's Oldest Indian", so maybe I'll have better luck with the fastest
Indian.  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on September 10, 2010, 09:01:31 PM
"Of course, Gumtree, and I have impeccable diction.

I'd like to hear you -- I've never known anyone with impeccable diction.

I saw the "Indian" movie and loved it. Especially the extra material that interviewed the NZ townspeople. I cant remember the name either, but I know I got it from Netflix, so they have it. If I could remember the name of the online site that tells you everything about actors, I would say look up "Anthony Hopkins" on it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on September 10, 2010, 09:13:36 PM
It's Internet Movie Data Base,

http://www.imdb.com/ (http://www.imdb.com/)

and you could surely find it there.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 10, 2010, 10:05:25 PM
JoanK - Of course I was using my odd sense of humour and irony when discussing "impeccable diction".  Mine certainly isn't, and I don't really know if Gum has impeccable diction either.  Probably the most "impeccable diction" i have ever heard was from a fondly remembered colleague, David, who was an ex Oxford Don and who had had J.R.R. Tolkien as a lecturer.  Listening to his voice was a most pleasurable experience.  David was a true gentleman, a rare breed indeed.  One day I will post in the Poetry discussion a poem he wrote for me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on September 10, 2010, 10:22:53 PM
Wow!  Tolkien as a lecturer.  But I bet your friend didn't get his diction from Tolkien.  Apparently J. R. R. T. used to lecture with his pipe firmly clamped between his teeth, and was barely intelligible.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 10, 2010, 10:24:48 PM
David loved him.  Said he did smell of pipe smoke though. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on September 10, 2010, 10:30:13 PM
I would have loved him too.  He was a remarkable man.  His translations are world class, and his feeling for the power of myth and how to use it to make a compelling story make The Lord of the Rings superb.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on September 11, 2010, 02:16:27 AM
Ditto to PatH - Tolkien was one of a kind. Interesting about the diction - wasn't Tolkien raised in South Africa - born there anyway - so Tolkien's speech would possibly have had an influence from there.

I doubt I've ever heard 'impeccable' diction but occasionally there's a voice one admires.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 11, 2010, 06:14:06 AM
I thought Winston Churchill, Everett Dirkson, Barbara Jordan and Richard Burton all did a very good job of impeccable diction.  There was one whose voice used to appear on the radio, as well, and I adored his way with words but, most unfairly, have forgotten his name.  Lowell Thomas was not bad at all.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 11, 2010, 08:39:36 AM
I found it when I substituted 'fastest' for 'oldest', JOANK. It's on
my queue. Thanks for the hint about the NZ interviews. I've never watched those and would have skipped them if you hadn't spoken up.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 11, 2010, 09:44:38 AM
Barbara Jordan will always take first prize, as far as I am concerned.  I loved hearing her speak in that well modulated, precise manner.  Absolutely no way to miss-hear what she was saying!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 11, 2010, 01:49:38 PM
So true!  So true!

I had her pegged back in, oh, was it 1973?  To be the first female president of these United States!

Then she went and got, what?  Muscular Dytrophy?  MS?  Something that put her in a wheel chair and out of politics.  Our loss!

Well, not to mention hers.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 11, 2010, 02:06:26 PM
I googled and it was MS, MaryPage.  Also, learned that her Keynote speech to the Democratic Convention in 1976 ranks 5th on the list of Top 100 American Speeches of the 20th century.  That doesn't surprise me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 11, 2010, 02:28:30 PM
Does thinking someone has impeccable diction depend on what part of the country/world you AND the other person come from? Do the British think any Americans have impeccable diction? G :D..........Jean 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on September 11, 2010, 02:30:32 PM
She's not quite out of politics -- she's still in the Senate. Although I moved from Maryland four years ago, I still get campaign literature from her.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 11, 2010, 02:30:47 PM
Good question.

Barbara Jordan was from Texas, was never in the Senate of the United States, though she was in the Texas Senate.   She died in 1998.

Perhaps you are thinking of Barbara Mikulski of Maryland.  Now she IS in the United States Senate.  She is no orator, but she is quite feisty and full of refreshing candor.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on September 11, 2010, 02:33:26 PM
Am I thinking of someone else???
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 11, 2010, 02:37:09 PM
She was in the House of Representatives as a Congressman from Texas.  She died in 2008.  If she is still sending out literature, JoanK, she was even more powerful than I realized.  ;D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on September 11, 2010, 02:38:29 PM
What is the name of the Maryland Congresswoman? Major Senior moment.

OK. I'm thinking of Barbara Mikulski, a Maryland Senator. My bad.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 11, 2010, 02:39:49 PM
Barbara Mikulski is the Senior Senator from the Freestate of Maryland in the United States Senate.

Jordan died in 1998.  I Googled it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 11, 2010, 03:25:27 PM
Barbara Mikulski is the Senior Senator from the Freestate of Maryland in the United States Senate.

Jordan died in 1998.  I Googled it.


I looked again.  We were both wrong.  She died in 1996.  But, what does it matter when?   America lost a great citizen and a great voice when she left us.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 11, 2010, 03:52:40 PM
I absolutely agree!

And hey, I went back and looked to see how I could have been so mistaken.  It was my eyesight.  The 6 in 1996 looked like an 8 to my failing eyes!

Ain't being old a hoot!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 11, 2010, 04:03:08 PM
As Bette Davis said, "It ain't for sissies!"  lol
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on September 11, 2010, 10:24:29 PM
"Ain't being old a hoot!" HOOT, HOOT!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on September 13, 2010, 01:58:22 PM
I just read that the film actor, Kevin McCarthy, died at age 96.  He was that good looking main character in the 1956 film, Invasion of the Body Snatchers.  I put one of his last films on my Netflix queue--WESLEY (2009).  It sounds very interesting, a film about John Wesley, the clergyman whose embrace of progressive social causes -- including the abolition of slavery -- had a profound impact on British society in the 1700s, igniting the Methodist movement.  McCarthy has a small role as a Bishop Ryder.  The movie gets a good rating at IMDB, 7.8/10.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 14, 2010, 01:43:54 AM
Does thinking someone has impeccable diction depend on what part of the country/world you AND the other person come from? Do the British think any Americans have impeccable diction? G :D..........Jean 

That is an excellent question, Jean, and raises a whole host of possibilities.  I guess impeccable diction is what is the easiest on one's ears.  For me, at least, it doesn't have a lot to do with class, but perhaps choice of words and thought about those words is also part of it.  We had an ex PM, Bob Hawke, who had a very Strine accent, yet he was exceptionally intelligent. 

Australia does not have the variety of accents that the UK and US have, nor does it have class distinction to the extent of the UK.  Here, for me it is easier to pick vocabulary differences, e.g. there are several different vocab differences between states for swimsuits such as cossies, togs, bathers, speedos (a particularly interesting expression and cause of much jollity between Aussies) swimmingtogs, swimmers and I have no doubt there are more.  But although Kiwis (New Zealanders) have a very similar accent to ours, there are subtle differences that maybe only Australians can pick up.  The poor Kiwis are teased unmercifully about these little differences.  They say "six" for "sex", pin for pen and so on.  I had a Kiwi friend who was always teased about her pins and sixes and she complained to me one day about how it was for her being surrounded by people "who ALL talked funny". 

The down to earth linguists say enjoy and be proud of your accent, the purists say it doesn't matter what your accent is as long as you can be understood.  You can see this leading into the argument that some foreign accents sound better to our ears than others, French for example. (see recognition below).

The UK also has a different regional accent for about every 3km travelled.  I spoke to a relative from Mercia (Midlands)one night and I thought he was "putting on" his accent just for me.  He sounded so different.  It is said that the Cockney accent had the most influence on Aussie English because of Australia being a penal settlement and that most of the convicts came from the East End of London.  Although, of course, I love "impeccable diction" I am no slave to it, and my accent is most certainly Australian.  Just for the record my favourite accent in the US is Southern; and my favourite accent in the UK is Scottish followed closely by Irish (not UK).  I think this is probably because I can recognise them.  Most US accents sound the same to me, except for Texan maybe (Thanks Mr Bush). Irish and Canadian sound very similar to my ear.  I could go on....  Can any of our US friends distinguish between regional accents and vocabulary?

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on September 14, 2010, 06:08:03 AM
Roshannarose,
I can usually pick out the different U.S. regional accents.  I am from TX and can usually tell E.TX from W.TX.  I, too, find the southern accents most pleasant to my ear.  There are definite differences between Boston & N.Y.  It's sometimes hard to distinguish between Calif. and Florida.  Tennessee & TX sound a lot a like--probably because most Texas originated there.  Some of the English accents sound like a foreign language to me!
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 14, 2010, 08:42:09 AM
Thanks for mentioning the movie about John Wesley, MARJ. I have a good biography of him. Didn't know there was  movie at all, at all.

Quote
"Most US accents sound the same to me, except for Texan maybe.."

 Rose, I think you must not have heard a native of New Jersey speaking,
or Georgia, or Brooklyn. It is entirely possible, tho', in this age
of mass television, the more distinctive accents perhaps are being
eroded away.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on September 14, 2010, 08:43:48 AM
We Tennessean/Texans probably have a hard time being understood  ;) (grew up in Texas, lived the last 48 years in Tennessee).  I love regional accents, too.  I was born in St. Louis, and though we moved to TX when I was 7, I can recognize a SL accent usually.  I definitely agree with a definite East TX accent (my parents and grandparents from NE TX, others along the Rio Grande).  My favorite US accent, I guess, is what we have called "educated Southern).

We noticed the differences between NZ and Aussie accents when we were there.  We thought it was interesting that the Kiwis and Aussies frequently couldn't tell if we were from the US or from Canada.  

I think it's a shame that we (in the US, at least) seem to be losing regional accent.  More and more of us just have "TV accents".  (Babi, you got here just before I did, and mentioned the same thing.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 14, 2010, 09:35:21 AM
I was often asked in Scotland if I was from the States or Canada.  When I asked, people said that those from the U.S. had a harsher accent that most Canadians.  I grew up in Kansas and though I have lived in many parts of the U.S. and picked up many regional speech mannerisms, I still have that mid-Western twang. 

I like your term "educated Southern", Maryz.  Here in NC it is a strong contrast between that and rural Southern.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on September 16, 2010, 03:40:15 PM
"Can any of our US friends distinguish between regional accents and vocabulary?"

I once lived in Brooklyn, briefly, and a friend from Virginia came to visit me. I introduced her to a Brooklyn neighbor, and they literally couldn't understand each other. I had to translate! But that is the most extreme difference I've encountered.

I once met a man at a party who claimed he could tell where anyone in America was born. He succeeded with everyone but me. He picked up the Ohio accent from my parents, but I've never lived in Ohio. I was born and raised in Washington, D.C. which apparently has no regional accent.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on September 16, 2010, 04:10:04 PM
I just received in the mail my very own hard-cover copy of 84 Charing Cross Road - which I promptly sat down and read.  This is an edition that has an introduction by Anne Bancroft.  She relates the story of how she happened to play the part.

She was sitting on the beach at Fire Island, and a total stranger stopped and told he'd just read something that would be a perfect part for her.  She was at the same place the next day, and the same person handed her the book.  Of course, she was enchanted with it.  Later, her husband (Mel Brooks) with some of his Hollywood friends acquired the movie rights and gave it to her as a surprise Christmas present. 

Isn't that a great story!

Now I need to drag out the DVD and watch the movie again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 16, 2010, 04:51:45 PM
The movie is on its way to me, Mary, and will be here tomorrow.  I'm really looking forward to it. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on September 16, 2010, 05:25:08 PM
maryz, that is a great story. I've now got 84 CHARING CROSS on my TBR list.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on September 19, 2010, 02:07:49 PM
I loved the film Charing Cross Road.  Thank I'll get it and rewatch it.

Just watched a very good noir thriller -- THE BIG CLOCK (1948). Great plot and very good acting from a great cast -- Ray Milland, Charles Laughton, Elsa Lanchester, Maureen O'Sullivan. Available at Netflex.
This was remade in 1987 as NO WAY OUT with Gene Hackman and Kevin Costner -- plot a bit different, but same suspenseful situation.
 
Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on September 19, 2010, 02:23:13 PM
Anything with that cast should be good!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 19, 2010, 06:06:47 PM
I loved 84 Charing Cross Road.  Well, I mean, how could I not!  But, I didn't even recognize Judi Dench when she first appeared on screen.  Different hair color, different hair style, different kind of part for her.  And, gosh, how times have changed.  I found myself worrying that Ann Bancroft was smoking so much.  I was forgetting the time period....did we really smoke that much all the time back then?  Goodness!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on September 19, 2010, 10:19:36 PM
84 Charing Cross Road - great film - you've talked me into taking another look at it. I'll put in on my queue right now.

Last night we watched Mystic River for the first time. Compelling viewing even though I missed some dialogue here and there due mainly to the realism Eastwood was perhaps trying to convey. Hard on folk who are not truly attuned to all American accents. The film has a lot to say - some of it tragic. I think I'm still digesting parts. Apart from the indistinct speech, my only real criticism was that there seemed to be no comic relief throughout or maybe I missed that nuance.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: kiwilady on September 20, 2010, 03:58:19 AM
We think the Aussies say Feesh and Cheeps for Fish and Chips. To us an Australian accent is totally different from ours. It cracks me up when narrators on Audio books speak in either an Australian accent or a South African accent when trying to portray a New Zealander in the book. They more often sound like South Africans actually.

Carolyn
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on September 20, 2010, 04:26:48 AM
Kiwilady  Yep, you're right - Aussie and NZ accents are very different. To us, the NZ is more akin to the South African and sometimes it will take me a minute or two to work out which one I'm hearing.  In any case, viva la difference
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on September 20, 2010, 03:00:28 PM
How about that. I'd didn't know the accents were very different, but then I don't think I've ever talked to an New Zealander. As far as South African and Australian, sometimes I have to listen carefully. It isn't always easy to tell.

Speaking of - there is a South African student in my class. He sounds more English than South African. We all mistook him for English. I must here report a sad state of affairs. Mind you, these are college students. When he said he was from South Africa, more than one of the students wanted to know which country in South Africa he was from.  :o 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on September 20, 2010, 04:24:55 PM
I've had both Australian and New Zealander friends in the lab, but not simultaneously, and I would hate to be tested on the accents.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 20, 2010, 11:01:48 PM
I have two lovely South African ladies as friends.  One, Babs, used to help me out as a tutor in the computer class I used to teach.  The other, Caroline, was a teaching colleague.  Babs left SA because she and her husband had divorced, and she had two teenage daughters and often felt unsafe.  She told me that she realised that she had to leave SA when she checked to make sure her hand gun was in the glovebox.  Babs actually called it a "revolver".  Handgun and Babs do not go together at all.  Anyway, Babs has a beautiful lilting English accent, and could not easily be picked as anything other than English.  Caroline, on the other hand, has a slightly discernible accent.  She jokingly corrects my choice of words.  For example, I am most definitely not allowed to use the word "toilet", I must say "lavatory".  And when preparing a cup of tea it is (according to Caroline) absolutely "not on" to pour milk into the cup first.  She is such a darling, but lives a fair distance from me and we rarely meet.  When we do we tease each other unmercifully about being Australian and South African. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 21, 2010, 08:57:19 AM
 Ah, we all have our euphemisms.  We don't say toilet here (Texas) either, but rest room or 'ladies room' in public.  Of course if we're at home we don't say anything, just get up and
go. If there are visitors, a polite 'excuse me' is all that's needed.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 21, 2010, 12:41:35 PM
Does anyone besides me remember when Jack Parr got thrown off his network late night show (he preceded Johnny Carson) for a couple of weeks as punishment for mentioning "W.C." on the show? 

W.C. stands for "water closet" in Great Britain, which is a toilet.  Just about everyone (I never yet have run into anyone who remembers it who felt differently) was amazed the network, NBC I think it was, penalized him in such a harsh way.  Me, I never understood them getting upset AT ALL! 
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 21, 2010, 03:10:16 PM
Yes, I remember. Ithink it was a joke about a wc that was the problem, although still seems over top, but we are judging from 50 yrs later.......jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on September 21, 2010, 03:21:43 PM
Boy, you sure have to do a lot more than that to get thrown off the air now! ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 21, 2010, 03:39:16 PM
Perhaps I am not recalling it correctly but I don't think Parr was thrown off.  I believe they censored his WC joke...that angered him and he walked off.  I'm trying to google and find out what is the correct story.

EDIT:  According to several Google sources that was it....he walked off because NBC censored his wc joke.  I remember thinking it was all kind of silly.  Parr was inclined to get overly emotional from time to time...even occasionally cry about something or other.  He wasn't really one of my favorites.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on September 21, 2010, 08:46:47 PM
I loved to listen to Jack Parr.  He had the most interesting guests of any of the talk show hosts, i.e. President Nixon playing the piano.  You never knew what was going to happen on his show.  Another talk show host I loved was Dick Cavett who was also a great conversationalist and had the most interesting people as guests, many of them authors.  Nowadays, all most of the talk show hosts have as guests are so-called celebrities, usually big chested blondes you never heard of who can't talk about anything but their own boring selves.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on September 21, 2010, 09:31:32 PM
  
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)



I often use "loo", I can only figure it comes from "Waterloo".   :)  
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on September 21, 2010, 09:39:39 PM
That's a good point.  I have no idea where it came from.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 21, 2010, 11:22:41 PM
Good memory, Phyll, as soon as I read what you said I knew that was right, he walked off. Yes, those were interesting conversations and interesting guests on both Parr and Cavett. Guests were not just on to promote a movie or a book, and I think the conversations were not so scripted as many of them are today. Craig Fergueson comes the closest to Parr, although he is a comic and must be funny. Parr's genius was that he was the straight-man, not the comic during the conversations.......Jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on September 22, 2010, 09:19:49 AM
I do agree with you about Dick Cavett.  He was an intelligent gentleman and was able to carry on an intelligent conversation with interesting guests.  I don't watch talk shows any more for the very reasons you mentioned, Marj.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 22, 2010, 01:48:18 PM
I totally agree about both Cavett and Parr.  Yes, Parr was quite emotional, but he was one of the best interviewers I have ever heard/seen.  And I really do think their shows attempted to bring us real entertainment and a chance to get to know important and interesting people.  Today, the talk show people seem to want to sell us their own ideas about what we should know and who we should hear from.

Wasn't it also on the Jack Parr Show that we first saw and heard Carole Burnett?  I remember her singing a song at the top of her wonderful lungs that she had written herself called:  "I'm In Love With John Foster Dulles."  As I recall, it was such a huge hit that the Secretary of State let the network know (The Washington Post had printed the story with the lyrics) he had missed it and wished he hadn't, so they brought her back again to repeat her big success at a time when he would be watching.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on September 22, 2010, 02:01:43 PM
I think Carol Burnett's first tv appearance was on the Gary Moore Show. She may have had an appearance on Parr before that, but having read a lot of biography about her I think she was called to NYC to appear on the Moore show.......Jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 22, 2010, 03:15:02 PM
Looking on line for something about it, I found this in an extremely long piece about Jack Parr.

"Paar helped launch the careers of such performers as Carol Burnett, Woody Allen and Liza Minnelli, but his guests weren’t limited to the glitterati. He discussed religion with Billy Graham, visited with Albert Schweitzer in Africa, and talked politics with Richard Nixon, all before the transfixed eyes of the American television audience. He was an engaging and sentimental personality, who gained the immediate appreciation of his audience and his guests. Of him, Bill Cosby said, “I found him to be a very, very wonderful man, and intellectually funny — able to take a moment, realize it, and say something that was absolutely brilliant. He wouldn’t want to ‘play anybody cheap.’ He’s wanted to get the best out of each and every performer.”
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 22, 2010, 03:22:54 PM
Here is another snippet from another site.  I think Garry Moore came later in her career.

"Burnett bounced back with a parody pop song, "I Made a Fool of Myself Over John Foster Dulles," confessing her love for the utterly unsexy, 68-year-old Secretary of State who is now best remembered as the namesake for Dulles Airport outside Washington DC. The song became a minor pop hit after Burnett sang it on Jack Paar's Tonight Show in 1957.

"
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on September 22, 2010, 06:43:51 PM
I loved watching Jack Parr - when Dad would let me stay up that late. My favorite guest was Malcolm Muggeridge. He also let me stay up to see Ernie Kovacs on occasion. I also liked Dick Cavett, and was disappointed when his show was cancelled.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on September 25, 2010, 11:14:42 AM
Carol Burnett -- Is she still active?  I think the film I liked her best in was Pete and Tillie, with Walter Mathou.

Jack Parr -- is he the one who got into a bruhaha with Drew Pearson?  Or am I mixing him up with someone else.  At any rate, I never watched him much, too late at night for me.

In New York with SeniorLearn I had a chance to watch a big screen film with Joan Roberts and her daughter Meg --  French,  with English subtitles -- Change of Plans, about the interacting lives of guests at a dinner party.  It's one I'd like to see again, just to clear up some things, but, wonder of wonders, it does not appear in the Netflix database.

But here's one that does, but since it's opening sometime this fall, who knows when the DVD will be out.  Remember the Scooter Libbly leak to Robert Novak, about CIA agent Valerie Plame?  All because some folks were unhappy with her husband?  With Naomi Watts and Sean Penn --

Fair Game (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/26/fashion/26Plame.html)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 25, 2010, 02:01:30 PM
Am dying to see that movie.

I own Ambassador Joseph Wilson's "The Politics of Truth," but I do not think I have Valerie Plame's book.  Sigh!  Too many books, too little time.  Would that I owned Lisbeth Salander's photographic memory and ability to speed read!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on September 25, 2010, 07:44:25 PM
But not the rest of her character?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 26, 2010, 05:31:35 AM
Her intelligence and her loyalty.  Otherwise, (shudder), nothing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 27, 2010, 08:19:10 AM
 Uh, who is Lisbeth Salander?  Sounds like I ought to know already.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 27, 2010, 08:46:02 AM
The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

The Girl Who Played With Fire

The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest

The girl who is paying the wages of all the book store clerks these days, has featured in 3 great Swedish movies and is about to feature in 3 Hollywood films, and the girl we will never hear from again as her creator died before he even held a single published volume in his hands.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 28, 2010, 08:06:04 AM
 Ah, that explains why I don't know her.  I didn't care for the one Wallender film I started watching,  and the descriptions of his books told me they weren't the kind of thing I enjoy.
I don't doubt the man is a good writer since so many of you have said so, but I'd rather pass
on this lot.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on September 28, 2010, 08:58:34 AM
I think the main reason, and it is an emotional reaction, I admit, but the main reason I am so enthusiastic about Steig Larsson's books featuring Lisbeth Salander is that he really got it.  He really dug how insidious the little mannerisms of men in daily life that indicate their mental dismissiveness of women having any significance, not to mention that awful slope we continually toil during our lifetimes while learning, either through ghastly first-hand experience, or by way of heartbreak recounted by our sisterhood, or through the media, about the myriad young women snared by the sex trade traffic all over this globe or murdered by their fathers, brothers, husbands, pimps or boyfriends.  I have sobbed and sobbed reading about the young brides in India who are burned to death so their inlaws can obtain another bride and yet another dowry, and over women in Central Asia and the Middle East who are killed by their own families because they have been raped or have even given the appearance of having dishonored the family in some way.  The baby girls smothered at birth, thrown out, exposed to the elements.  Life is often cruel and unfair, but the bias against the sex I was born one of stuns me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on September 28, 2010, 05:40:26 PM
I thoroughly enjoyed the Larsson trilogy and it seems we have beaten the novels to death.  I did not get the least hint of some message re the biases of the sexes, rather merely good vs evil in some well written page turners.  Anyway, on the light side, I saw Tuck Everlasting last eve and strongly suggest you consider it for an evening of light hearted, sentimental relaxation.  Would you drink of the spring?  I need to ponder that a bit.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 29, 2010, 08:47:28 AM
 I read "Tuck Everlasting" some time ago, JIM.  I gave it some thought and decided 'No; I would
not drink of the spring, but live my life'. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on September 29, 2010, 12:21:23 PM
Babi:  My sentiments precisely. Earthly life is good, but it ain't a bowl of cherries.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on September 30, 2010, 08:07:15 AM
 Life can be very hard, JIM, but isn't it good to enjoy the cherries along the way?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on September 30, 2010, 02:59:05 PM
Babi:  Indeed it is.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 08, 2010, 02:08:27 PM
Tuck Everlasting sounds like it might be a good antidote (?) after watching two of the Larsson films -- have not yet read the books.

When in New York a few weeks ago I came across a pullout section in the NY Times listing all the movies coming out this fall.  I wanted to save it, but it got in daughter's recycling pile before I realized.  Now, of course, I can't find it on line.  Has anyone seen it?  Or, have you seen any of the new films that are just coming out?

How about documentaries -- have any of you seen any of the new ones that are being talked about.  I really wanted to see Waiting for Superman, after hearing so much about it during NBC's weeklong discussion about education.  For some reason, I thought it would be on television.  Now I guess I'll wait for the DVD.  Another one, big NYT review today -- Inside Job -- all about the 2008 financial meltdown, narrated by Matt Damon.

From what I understand, the latter is less biased than the former.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 10, 2010, 09:51:03 AM
I really don't know whether or not my ophthalmologist is exceptionally qualified or merely a "run of the mill" doctor but I don't care.  He's an avid reader and we discuss books of all kinds while his waiting room fills with anxious patients.  Last week he recommended "Cutting for Stone:  A Novel" by Abraham Verghese and explained that it concerned the need for a more personal doctor-patient relationship in the medical profession.  He was rather enthusiastic about the book so I immediately ordered it from Amazon.  It's due in shortly. If you've read this book, please give me your comments.  I'll read it anyway but I value the comments of other readers.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 10, 2010, 11:56:35 AM
Gosh, Jim, like minds.  I'm glad to hear your doctor's comments.   I don't remember who recommended this to me or where or if I read the review of Cutting for Stone, but just this week I downloaded it to my Kindle.  I've got too many "must reads" on the docket right now, so it will be a while before I get to it, but I'm looking foward to it.

I watched two movies this week, both enjoyable, light feel good Netflix 4 stars --

City Island with Andy Garcia and Julie Margulies (and I didn't recognize her   :(  )
  With my youngest now living in Brooklyn I'm always eager to watch just about anything with a New York skyline.  Have flown over City Island the last two trips to NY.

It's Complicated with Alec Baldwin and Meryl Streep.  Streep is so alive and bubbly, you can't help but be caught up in it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on October 10, 2010, 02:22:08 PM
Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese  was terrific!  There are some violent sections, but all in all it's one of the best novels I've read in the last few months!   (and I zoom through maybe 12 novels a month).

My only question is why are we mentioning this here?  Is there a movie connection?   Should we post some of this in the Library?   merely asking.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 10, 2010, 03:35:27 PM
I just saw the movie The Social Network.  Really interesting story of the young man who started Facebook.  The acting was great altho' there was not one character I liked in the movie, but it was so fascinating to watch and see what happened.  Now I'm going to read the book by Ben Mezrich.  Mezrich wrote another good book I read, 21:BRINGING DOWN THE HOUSE, a true story of six M.I.T. students who took Vegas for millions of $$$.  It was also made into a movie.  I heard there was a better, more accurate book about Facebook by David Kirkpatrick, but Mezrich got there first, and that's what counts.  Mezrich, also a young man,  must be enjoying big bucks by now.  

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 10, 2010, 06:44:48 PM
Thanks for the Mezrich info, Marj.  I now have both those films on my Netflix que, but if they start talking about probability, and profits etc. in the earlier film, the probability is that I won't understand it.

Mezrich graduated from Harvard in 1991 -- magna cum laude.  Has written about 10 or 11 books.  He's probably doing very well for himself.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 10, 2010, 10:01:17 PM
Here's that pullout section on fall movies from the NYT.  September releases are shown and there's a sidebar with links to Oct., Nov., and Dec.  It will be interesting to see which ones become the blockbusters.

Fall movies (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/12/movies/12sept.html?ref=movies)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 10, 2010, 10:35:31 PM
Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese  was terrific!  There are some violent sections, but all in all it's one of the best novels I've read in the last few months!   (and I zoom through maybe 12 novels a month).

My only question is why are we mentioning this here?  Is there a movie connection?   Should we post some of this in the Library?   merely asking.
Things come up wherever they come up, not always in the logical place.  We recently had a discussion about poetry in one of the games.  If such a discussion seems to me to be  specially interesting, I often re-post my comments in the logical spot, or call attention to it if it isn't my post.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on October 11, 2010, 04:44:08 AM
Pedln: Thanks for posting the Fall Movies - something for everyone there - one or two have already opened here - so I guess they'll be our Spring Movies.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 11, 2010, 09:59:15 AM
 12 novels a month?!!  How do you do it, MIPPY? If I sit too long reading, I'm really
stiff when I get up. The frequent 'get up and do something else' is a serious
interruption. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 11, 2010, 10:54:02 AM
Mippy:  You are absolutely right.  My comments re Cutting for Stone:  A Novel do not belong in this category since the book hasn't, to my knowledge, been made into a movie.  Excuse me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 11, 2010, 11:17:10 AM
Hey, JimNT, it's good to hear your thoughts wherever.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on October 12, 2010, 06:51:07 AM
Aside:  none of this is about Movies, so skip if you wish
Hi, Babi ~   How?  Speed reading is a blessing and a curse.   When I read lite fiction, whatever that is, I let my mind float through the book, and enjoy it but usually don't remember much.  And I love my new Kindle.

However, whenever I read non-fiction (usually one or two books a month) I do slow down.  Right now I've started the newly released bio. of Geo. Washington by Chernow.

I've decided not to get non fiction on my Kindle, since it's difficult to back-track and reread sections, or to pick up the book months later to review something.   During the discussion of the non-fiction, excellent book about New Orleans during Katrina,Zeitun, I tried bookmarks in the Kindle, but never used them the way you use tiny scraps of paper or post-it notes ... just did not help at all for me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 12, 2010, 10:17:18 AM
Mippy, I'm glad to hear your comments about backtracking on the Kindle.  You confirm my suspicions that it would play out that way for me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 12, 2010, 11:22:07 AM
Mippy:  Zeitun was another book recommended by my 0phthalmologist.  I bought it, too, and am awaiting anxiously for delivery.  Incidentally, the good doctor is from N'awlins.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 12, 2010, 12:55:02 PM
We just finished discussing Zeitoun here.  I think you'll enjoy it; it's a very good job. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 12, 2010, 02:08:12 PM
PatH:  I went back to August 31st and couldn't find any discussion of Zeitun but I might have overlooked it.  Could you give me a lead, please?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 12, 2010, 03:21:55 PM
Jim, I'm not PatH, but here is the link to the Zeitoun discussion.  Discussions that have finished are stored in Archives -- if you scroll the SL index, you'll find it towards the bottom.  It was a terrific book and a great discussion.


Zeitoun discussion (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=1585.0)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 12, 2010, 03:32:09 PM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


Back to the movies -- in today's USAToday there was a brief blurb about Dewey the Library Cat, the book, which is being made into a movie starring Meryl Streep -- and no doubt, Dewey.  The article itself was to inform Dewey lovers that a sequel is on its way -- Dewey's Lives, or some such.

Somehow that doesn't strike me as a Meryl Streep sort of thing, but who knows.  She does jolly and bubbly real well.

Re:Kindle -- I'm still experimenting and playing with mine, a Kindle3 or Latest Generation.  One title I picked up quite early was Girl With the Dragon Tatoo. (am leading my f2f in Dec.) I was quite surprised to find out that the highlights or clips or whatever-you-call-ems of other readers, past and previous, were included on my Kindle, supposedly for my benefit.  For better or for worse, I deleted them -- I think.  There's a learning curve there, so I'm not sure.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 13, 2010, 01:10:56 PM
Pedln:  Do not go near the Kindle.  The Surgeon General has ruled it detrimental to ones health as documentation has shown it causes deterioration of the eye lens.  Some have experienced severe depression, OCD, ADD, & AIDS.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on October 13, 2010, 01:38:59 PM
Jim, did you mean that as a joke (about the Kindle)?  If not, where did you see that report.  I can't find anything to document what you said.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on October 13, 2010, 03:50:03 PM
Yes, tell us more!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on October 13, 2010, 04:04:56 PM
I think the Surgeon General needs an attitude adjustment!  Kindle causing diseases, poppycock.  Of course we know that any new technology brings out the anti-science nuts, (how many of us now have brain cancer from using our cellphones?) Kindle might produce eye problems if one stays on it 24/7.  But same for computer screen right?  Bah humbug!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 13, 2010, 04:22:12 PM
The fact that the last item the Kindle is supposed to cause is AIDS should tell you whether Jim is serious. ;D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on October 13, 2010, 05:27:43 PM
Guess I'm not used to seeing Jim be so funny! LOL
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 13, 2010, 05:46:03 PM
PatH & Tomereader have my number.  I'm simply in love with hardcovers!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on October 13, 2010, 06:13:33 PM
Let's see.......I'm in love  w/my iPad, I cld get AIDS by being in love w/ a person, therefore, I cld get AIDS from my iPad.........isn't that something like the logic we learned in philosophy class?..... ;D..........Jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on October 13, 2010, 06:14:27 PM
Jim, I have a Kindle.  Use it very little, love the feel, smell of a real book, yes, especially hard cover ones.  I love book jackets, too!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 13, 2010, 08:16:04 PM
Mabel, I got my logic in high school geometry, and I would love to see my teacher laugh at your non-syllogism.

Jim, I too dearly love the smell and feel of a real book, plus the ability to flip back and forth, and fall asleep reading and not worry if it falls on the floor.  But Kindle is invaluable for people with vision problems, or arthritis problems that make it hard to hold a book, plus it would make it easier to pack for trips, since you wouldn't have the weight of hard copies.  So I suspect that somewhere down the line I will be very grateful for Kindle, but not yet.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on October 13, 2010, 10:26:57 PM
I still do 95% of my reading cuddled up, in my bed, at night, with a BOOK. And I also like the out of print and esoteric books that I now have access to on my "library on my lap," otherwise known as an iPad. It doesn't have to be one or the other. ........ Thank goodness......Jean 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 13, 2010, 10:34:25 PM
Well said, Jean.  I like reading on the Kindle, but hey, if I can get a book at the library, fine, or the used bookstore, great. For thick books you don't want to carry with you, it's wonderful.

Jim, shame on you.  Just think how many man hours you might have had people spending in order to research your claims.    >:(
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on October 14, 2010, 06:21:44 AM
Well, since Pedln, amica mea, doesn't mind if we spend days and days away from talking about movies, here goes:
                      
Jim, you naughty one, how can you put spurious research on SeniorLearn?   Is it a joke?  No no no no as my 2 year old granddaughter says to everyone, especially her baby brother.   Do you go around telling people their computers are dangerous?  A Kindle is a little computer!  
                              
I really enjoy my Kindle for lite reading.  At last count, I've read about 70 novels since June.   We still buy newly published non-fiction in hardback, as my husband and I often read the same book (he goes first, usually) and he doesn't want to borrow my Kindle.  We often buy older non-fiction used, through either Amazon or AbeBooks.  

The Kindle was a gift from my kids last June, by the way.  What a great gift!  Now that the price is down, do consider it for that special someone this year ...  no, I don't own stock in Amazon   ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 14, 2010, 09:52:42 AM
Yesterday I was hoisted on my own petard.  My dear wife allowed me to choose the Wednesday afternoon movie we've come to habituate.  The senior discount on Wednesday has played no small role in this development.  I chose My Soul You'll Take in 3D.  The PC review gave it 4 of 5 stars and I was influenced by the 3D since I haven't seen one for years.  It was categorize as Suspense/Thriller/Horror and I was looking forward to a great afternoon of viewing a thrilling movie in an almost vacant theater.  It was a huge disappointment for the both of us; boring, silly, devoid of any reasonable plot, and altogether a disaster.  The 3D was of little help.  My wife has assumed the movie selection role in our family.  Save your money!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on October 14, 2010, 10:57:56 AM
Gee, Jim, don't hold back - tell us what you REALLY think.   ::)
I love honest reviews!  Thanks.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 14, 2010, 01:45:02 PM
Thanks for the thumbs-down, Jim.  After just now reading the reviews on Netflix I know I'll never want to see it.  I don't blame your wife for wanting to be the picker-outer   :o

But what was interesting on Netflix -- the director was mentioned a few times -- Wes Craven -- and folks were surprised he had come up with such a bad flick.  The name sounds familiar, but I can't place him with anything.  How about you?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 14, 2010, 01:52:22 PM
No, but IMDB came through as usual.  Think Nightmare on Elm Street.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on October 14, 2010, 02:01:39 PM
I think Wes Craven does most of all the "slasher" films. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 14, 2010, 08:24:56 PM
Good thing you gave your wife the job of choosing movies, Jim.  (LOL) You should have read the poor reviews it got at Internet Movie Database!  Too bad to waste an afternoon on such a bad movie.

I haven't seen a really good scary movie lately.  Can someone recommend a good one?

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on October 14, 2010, 10:44:49 PM
"Drag Me to Hell" is a horror movie I liked.  Directed by Sam Raimi.  I don't know your tastes Marj.  An oldie but a goodie is "Relic".  I have been reading "Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" and have found it to be a bit draggy in parts.  I saw the movie a couple of nights ago (the Swedish and original version) and thought it was excellent.  Very fast moving and cut out all the draggy bits.  Some confronting scenes with the heroine - but I don't want to be a spoiler.  Another movie I liked is "Let the Right One In" Swedish too, I think.  Atmosphere spot on and based on a book which is also very good.  There has been a recent remake of it released in US under another name, but the original is definitely worth a look.  
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 15, 2010, 01:45:16 AM
Thanks for the horror film recommendations, Roshanarose.  I'll give them a try!
I've read The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and have the Swedish film on my Netflix queue.  Will add the other Swedish film you mentioned.

I watched a really good horror flick last year, scary and funny; I'll post it when I remember the name.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 15, 2010, 09:55:05 AM
Scary AND funny?  That sounds interesting.

I haven't watched many horror movies -- get too tense.  I got scared watching Goldie Hawn walk around a deserted library carrying knitting needles.  (Can't remember the name of that one.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on October 15, 2010, 02:02:58 PM
I watched Frida last night, and was surprised to find it interesting. I didn't know much about Rivera and nothing about Frida.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on October 15, 2010, 02:54:57 PM
I've put The Relic on my Netflix queue.  It says "Availability Unknown" but hopefully it will show up eventually.  I loved the Preston and Child book however, I suspect since it says the movie is based on the book that there is much that has been changed.  I really like all of their books mainly for the descriptions of the areas where the story takes place.  Thanks for the recommendation, Rose.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 15, 2010, 05:07:45 PM
I'm glad to hear you liked Frida, Frybabe.  That's been one of those that I think I'll watch someday and then never get around to it.  I always seem to find something else I think is better.

A few years back my favorite DC museum -- Natl. Museum for Women in the Arts -- had an exhibit with Georgia O'Keefe, Frida, and the Canadian artist who did a lot of trees, can't remember her name.  Very interesting exhibit, representing all of North America.

Also: Babies came from Netflix yesterday.  So I stuffed it in the computer and watched it there.  Fun, maybe just a tad long, but cute, enjoyable.  Now on its way back.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on October 15, 2010, 09:06:26 PM
I watched The Relic quite a while ago. I remember being disappointed that it differed quite a bit from the book. I don't remember it clearly but I think they completely left out Agent Pendergast!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on October 15, 2010, 11:20:18 PM
pedln - I laughed out loud at the "horror movie" you described as Goldie Hawn walking around a library carrying knitting needles. 

marj - I am waiting patiently for that movie title ;-)

marcie - as I recall Agent Pendergast had not been invented as "Relic" was the first Preston and Child book written.  My sister-in-law and I went to see Relic together and she loved it.  Her occupation is Museum Curator.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on October 15, 2010, 11:34:21 PM
roshanarose, well I had to look it up. Apparently Agent Pendergast first appeared as a supporting character in their first novel, Relic, and in its sequel Reliquary, before assuming the protagonist role in The Cabinet of Curiosities. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agent_Pendergast. Since he wasn't one of the major characters, I understand how the film folks wanted to simplify and leave him out.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on October 16, 2010, 01:15:31 AM
I loved Frida - have a copy myself and play it from time to time. Geoffrey Rush and Albert? Molina were super in their roles as was Salma Hayek sp? who played Frida.

Last night we watched Julie and Julia for the first time. Missed it at the movies but it finally came up on my queue.

We also recently finished watching the series House of Cards/To Play the King with Ian Richardson. It's just as brilliant as I recall from seeing it on TV.

Thanks for reminding me about Relic - I haven't read the book or seen the film so will put it on my queue...
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 16, 2010, 01:32:08 PM
Gum,  I loved the House of Cards series on TV -- that evil Francis Urquart (Ian Richardson) -- have rewatched part of it on Netflix.  Still have to get the last one -- To Play the King.

I'm waiting for Monday's mail which should bring the recently released Italian DVD  Mid-August Lunch.  It's about a man who "baby-sits" a friend's mother and aunts.  The review I read ages ago sounded good.  We shall see.

About The Relic -- I'm not familiar with either the book or film and am not what you'd call a horror fan.  Should I pass this one by or am I missing something good?   :P
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on October 16, 2010, 02:11:55 PM
The Relic was a good book, and I was excited when they said a movie was coming out.  And as usual, I was totally disappointed in the movie.  Nowhere near as suspenseful and "scary" as the book.
It's not one I'd call "terrible", but if you've read the book first, you will understand. 
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on October 16, 2010, 09:44:23 PM
Tomereader - Yes.  I thought the book was good also.  I liked the movie because one could observe the inner workings of a museum and the politics surrounding it.  I didn't prefer one over the other.

pedln - If you have a large, ready to topple TBR perhaps you should put "Relic" about half way down. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on October 17, 2010, 08:50:39 AM
I liked Relic, the book. I am not a horror fan either. Don't ask me why I decided to read it. It probably had something to do with Ginny being such a Preston and Child fan that at her recommendation I gave it a try.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on October 17, 2010, 04:23:11 PM
We watched a remarkable performance last night in a wonderful movie made by HBO on Netflix.  Temple Grandin.  The actress in the lead role, Claire Danes, was wonderful.  It must have been a very difficult part but she did it very well.  I was interested in seeing the movie because my grandson has Asperger's Syndrome and I had read of Temple Grandin and her amazing life.  I really loved this movie and recommend it highly.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on October 17, 2010, 09:14:32 PM
I think Claire Dane won the Emmy for that role, Phyll.......Jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on October 17, 2010, 10:51:47 PM
Phyll, I saw the production of Temple Grandin on HBO and agree that it is amazing. I too highly recommend it. I read her book, "Thinking in Pictures," some time ago. It provides a lot of insight into how some people with autism see the world.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on October 18, 2010, 12:24:01 PM
Seconding (or thirding, LOL) these votes for "Temple Grandin".  Amazing woman, amazing actress portraying her.  While watching, I was thinking "this is Temple Grandin".  the idea that it was Clare Danes never entered my head.  Now, that's acting!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on October 18, 2010, 05:15:44 PM
And it would have been so easy to go over the top with that role.  She deserved her Emmy.  I looked up other movies  of hers and found one of Romeo+Juliet with L. DeCaprio.  I started to order it when I noticed it is in modern day setting.  I just don't like Shakespeare adapted to modern. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on October 18, 2010, 08:50:40 PM
Phyll - Take a few hours out of your life and watch Romeo+Juliet.  I am slightly biassed as the director, Baz Luhrmann, is Australian.  Apart from that it is quite an extraordinary movie and Leo and Claire are wonderful as the young lovers.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Phyll on October 19, 2010, 04:28:55 PM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


On your recommendation, Rose, I may try it but I really don't like Shakespeare adapted to modern.  As I watch these people in modern dress and in a modern setting speaking Shakespearian English, all I think is "They wouldn't say that!"..."They wouldn't speak that way!"  It is so distracting to me.  But, perhaps the performances will draw me in and soon I'll forget the things that seem so out of place.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on October 20, 2010, 02:58:25 AM
I resisted Shakespeare et al in modern dress and settings  until I saw Sir Ian McKellan's Richard III - brilliant brilliant brilliant. All the way through I kept saying to myself yeah/yeah that was OK but how's he going to handle 'A horse, a horse. My Kingdom for a horse'?  - well, it just blew me away - the setting of ruined military ordinance simply gave the words another nuance of meaning. I've been a reluctant convert ever since but even so prefer the setting and dress to be in keeping with the time the play was set.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 20, 2010, 08:23:16 AM
 I'm sold, GUM.  I'm going to hunt that one up on Netflix.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on October 20, 2010, 05:17:49 PM
Oh, yes, I loved it also, Gumtree!   He's amazing isn't he?
I agree than in general period costumes are the best.  Modern dress seems to distract, in most cases.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on October 21, 2010, 02:44:15 AM
Sorry to be dim, but what is Netfix?

I used to have a subscription to the DVD/CD section of our public library - can you believe the genius council has now abolished subscriptions "because they are too cheap"?  The only way you can now borrow a DVD is to pay the one off charge of £2.10 per item per week, which completely puts me off borrowing films I'm not sure about - whereas before I used to browse and try things on impulse, just as in the book library.  Apparently the borrowing has dropped hugely, so how they think that is going to make them more money is anyone's guess.  So much for public education, or indeed public anything.    >:( (grumpy old woman....)

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on October 21, 2010, 05:31:23 AM
Rosemary - you're an early bird. There's generally no one about when I come in at this time. I'm in Western Australia - our time is GMT+8 and I often post while others are sleeping.

I'll leave Netflix to be explained by someone who uses it.  We don't have it here - but the brief answer is that it's an online DVD rental deal. We have similar outfits and I use one consistently. Movies of choice come by mail and go back the same way. cost is low and value for money IMO.

Bad news about your library raising the cost of movies etc. - Luckily our library services are all free - a total of 12 items (books, mags, CDs DVDs Audiobooks, music, etc etc) at a time for 3 weeks loan with option to renew for a further two period of 3 weeks each (unless item is requested by another reader). Computer use including internet access is also available free. The cost is borne by local council (from our rates) and Govt subsidy. It's the best library service on the planet largely developed because of our geographical isolation - an argument that is losing its punch these days with information readily available on internet.

Mippy & Babi I've talked myself into it and have put RII on my queue.

We watched Sleepless in Seattle last night - Can't believe Tom Hanks was ever that young - and that lean. Also watched Body of lies earlier this week. Russell Crowe was absolutely convincing - as always.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on October 21, 2010, 07:53:45 AM
Gumtree pretty much said it all.  Netflix has a huge online catalogue, from which you construct your own queue, which can be rearranged at will.  When they get a DVD from you, they send the next one.  Turnaround is very fast--if I mail a disc on Monday I get the next one on Wednesday--and they are sent with postage-paid return envelopes, so it's no trouble.  Price varies with the number of discs you can have out at once (I have 3) but is very reasonable.  If you are set up for it, you can watch movies instantly on your computer, as many as you like.

GMT + 8.  I'm GMT - 5, so with daylight saving we're 12 hours apart.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 21, 2010, 11:23:58 AM
Rosemary, what a shame about your library and the DVDs.  I guess those of us who have really good library service don't always know how lucky we are.  Our library uses a library tax and is governed by a board, so the city council can't dictate to it or cut funding or services.

Nevertheless, I subscribe to Netflix, and like PatH can have three DVDs at a time.  Plus, I can watch as many as I'd like on my computer, but I rarely do that.  My son and family have a less expensive subscription, but he has put his engineering knowledge to work and they can watch the Netflix films on their 52" TV.  That would be nice, but I've got so many cords and wires already in the computer/tv room, and I don't need it.  I have plenty to watch already.

I had been looking forward to an Italian film, Mid-August Lunch, about a man who, for a fee, is taking care of three older women as well as his mother.  The write-up sounded good, but to me it was like one of those films where there is no script and the actors make up the dialog  as they go along.  It was OK, but .   .   .
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on October 21, 2010, 12:51:01 PM
Thanks all.  We do have a similar thing here called LoveFilm - I know many people do have membership, so perhaps I should look into it - but in the meantime I am going to tell our local councillor all about your various, much better, libraries.  When the subscriptions were first abolished (by means of a tiny notice in the library - the librarians had had no prior notice and were as shocked as we were - and of course they had to take all the flak), lots of us complained, and were told that Aberdeen was the only library in Scotland to offer the subscription (it was £50 per year) - apparently that was a good reason to abolish it.  And Aberdeen City Council wonders why it is bankrupt.

It's not so much the paying for LoveFilm that annoys me - I understand it's a very good service - but the constant erosion of public services.  I am particularly sensitive about the library, as free access to books (and DVDs) seems to me a fundamental human right and a means by which we protect our freedom (after all, in some countries governments use control of the written word as a means of controlling the population).  My parents were great library-goers - they could not have afforded to buy books - and I was taken to the children's library every Friday throughout my childhood.  I did the same with my children, and my youngest daughter and I still visit the library at least once a week.  Our Council has just closed one branch library, with more to follow - I went to the book sale that they held, and heard an elderly lady saying to the librarian that she would miss the library so much.  Not everyone can just jump into the car and go to another one, and for many people it's the social aspect that is so important.

It is the same with swimming pools - the Council are closing them as fast as they can - the one I go to is very popular with older people in the day time, and they come for a good chat as well as the exercise.  If the Council closes that pool, people will not only miss out on their swimming but also their social life - we are exhorted to get more exercise for our mental as well as our physical health, but apparently the Council is not going to facilitate this.  Of course, private gyms are springing up everywhere, but not only are they costly, they are also full of stick thin people in leotards and spray on tans - I for one would much rather go to the council pool and see nice friendly people who don't judge you by the cost of your trainers or the size of your thighs.

Sorry, rant over.  Maybe I should emigrate to Australia?!

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 22, 2010, 12:14:47 AM
I love Netflix.  I guess what really made that company into what it is was the invention of the DVD.  They sure couldn't have done it with those old video tapes -- too heavy, slow and expensive for reproducing and mailing.  I love the quick service and the no postage return envelopes, not to mention their tremendous supply of films as well as TV program series.
The only thing they don't have is a large variety of are the older films from the 1940s and back.  Luckily for those of us who live in the Los Angeles, CA area, there is a great video store in North Hollywood which has the old old movies as well as the newer ones for rent.  I just hope Netflix doesn't put them out of business as it has so many of the chain video stores.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on October 22, 2010, 08:14:44 AM
I live in a small town that is fortunate to have an excellent library (for its size) with knowledgeable librarians who are very friendly.  The library is a service that ought to be provided free of charge for all.  I see many small children who come from families that can not afford to buy books.  Our children's librarian has many programs for children of all ages.  Many families in this area cannot afford computers or internet access, so the computers in the library are really busy after school.

I grew up in the country in a small town.  During the summer months, my mother (who was a teacher) took us to the library every 2 weeks to stock up on books.  Having access to a library and helpful librarians has been a service that I never really appreciated until I was older.  I just assumed that was normal.  Now I am finding out that libraries around the country are having financial difficulties and many are closing.  For a number of years now, I have been giving donations to the library for special programs and in memory of friends and family who have passed on. 
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on October 22, 2010, 10:27:33 AM
I hate it when the libraries are the first things to get shorted when times are bad.  That's when folks need libraries the most.  Our library is, unfortunately, a joint function of our city and county governments, and they're always squabbling about who should do what.  And nobody ever wants taxes raised.  So the library suffers.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JudeS on October 23, 2010, 07:46:19 PM
This is my first time on this site and the discussion of libraries made me realize how lucky I have been to have great libraries near me.  I was such an avid reader that at age 15 I got a job at my local library and worked there throughout High School.

Noe in my city in California the days and hours of our library have been cut in half because of the lack of financed.  Luckily I am now retired and can get there when they are open.  Also the senior centers have hundreds of paperbacks that are free for the taking.

There are no video stores open anymore in my area (San Jose is a city of one million).  The library stocks some but everyone I know has Netflix.  They have thousands of titiles in every language and in every genre.  For 9.99 a month I see every film I have missed and wish to see or those I loved as a child and am watching again.
Recently I watched "Lifeboat" a marvelous film from WW2.  I saw it as a young child and looked at it now with adult eyes.  I didn't remember that it was a Hitchcock film and had won so many awards.  Tallulah Bankhead was marvelous.  Do any of you remember her? 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 24, 2010, 08:56:43 AM
 I remember Tallulah, JUDE.  She was quite a character.  I went looking for some quotes from
her, but found them all unsuitable for polite conversation.   :o
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on October 26, 2010, 03:54:02 PM
I have a great granddaughter named Tallulah!  We call her Lulu.

Bankhead was from one of the First Families of Alabama, I believe.  Her father was Speaker of the House and her uncle was a Senator.  She was one of the all time, Hall of Fame actresses.  And yes, quite a character.  She feared no man.  Or woman.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on October 26, 2010, 07:39:26 PM
Not from a book (I don't think), but we just got home from seeing RED, with Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman, Helen Mirren, John Malkovich.  A definite go-to-see movie - funny, lots of shooting and explosions, and great actors playing against type (except Willis, of course).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on October 26, 2010, 08:39:50 PM
Recently  on one of our PBS stations I saw "You must Remember This:the story of the Warner Brothers,  there are apparently 2parts. I saw the 30's and 40's and they announced there will be a 50's segment. It was really interesting. Clint Eastwood was the exec producer. You might want to check your local schedules ..........Jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 27, 2010, 10:11:29 AM
Thanks for recommending RED, MaryZ.  I adore Bruce Willis, and the movie sounds good with all those good actors.

Marj.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 27, 2010, 11:51:48 PM
RED sounds really good, MaryZ.  And what an all-star cast.  It's now on my N Queue.

Thanks for the heads up about the Warner Bros., Jean.  I'll check it out.

Tonight I watched a film with no one in it that I'd ever heard about -- Welcome to the Dollhouse. I think I requested it because the director, Todd Solondz, was recommended.  I have mixed feelings about this junior high film about a very troubled 7th grade girl.  I almost pulled the plug a few times because it didn't seem real, but I found myself really caring about the main character. (3 stars out of 5)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 28, 2010, 08:20:11 AM
 I agree, MARYZ.  I always enjoy Bruce Willis, but we rarely see him playing a different type of
character. I think that's why I liked "Sixth Sense" so well.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 28, 2010, 10:23:16 AM
For the second time, I chose There Will Be Blood from Netflix.  What a treat.  I've seen many movies over the years but this one is truly special.  Based on an Upton Sinclair book, Daniel Day-Lewis gives one of the most powerful performances I've ever seen.  I realize this is "old" news as I know most, if not all, have seen this movie and discussed it many times.  But I feel compelled to shout the glories of Lewis' performance.  Humor me, please.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on October 28, 2010, 09:42:59 PM
Hi Jim
Like you, I thought DDL's performance in "There Will be Blood" was excellent.  My only grumble is that I thought that the ending was a tad overdone.  DDL's two best movies imh are "My Left Foot" and "Last of the Mohicans".  "Mohicans" is one of those rare movies in which every actor gives of his/her best.  A Masterpiece!  DDL running through the undergrowth wearing a loincloth was a bonus ;-)  And I particularly appreciated Wes Studi as Bagua (spelling?).  I have been a great fan of his since, although he makes very few movies these days.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 29, 2010, 07:39:06 AM
Thanks for the comments and recommendations.  Yes, DDL made his point long before the scene ended.  I've seen My Left Foot and found it excellent.  I've somehow managed to avoid the Mohican's but will put it my Netflix queue.  I'm not familiar with the other actors but know from experience that so many excellent performances are made by "unknowns". 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 29, 2010, 09:01:15 AM
 If I saw "There Will Be Blood", I've forgotten.  What is it about?  It sounds somewhat ominous.
I'd like to find out a bit more before I add it to my Netflix queue.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on October 29, 2010, 11:45:15 AM
Babi, Netflix usually has a synopsis on the website, and (I think) some reviews, too.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 29, 2010, 12:15:24 PM
Babi:  There Will Be Blood is the story of a driven oilman at the turn of the century who sacrifices anything and anybody for the sake of bringing in a successful well.  Don't miss it or, if you've already seen it, see it again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on October 29, 2010, 03:26:15 PM
I read the movie Oil! by Upton Sinclair before I saw the movie.  Very good book.  It made me want to read more about the oil scandal in President Harding's administration, but I haven't gotten around to that yet.  The movie was a bit different fro the book, but very good also.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on October 30, 2010, 06:24:53 AM
My Left Foot  is really an excellent movie!  I'd see it again!

 I haven't watch a movie in months.  Now that I have the Directv
equivalent of Tivo, there's enough TV being recorded to use up all my evenings.   My dear hubby doesn't like to watch movies at all (except oldies with Jack Lemon or similar ones) so we haven't watched a movie together in a long time.   But no problemo, not complaining, still enjoy the comments here.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on October 30, 2010, 10:04:22 AM
 Oil wells, huh?  I am reminded of an oldie with Spencer Tracy and Clark
Gable.  It may have been "Boom Town", or perhaps another title. Dated,
of course, but with those two...espc. Tracy...always superb acting.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 30, 2010, 10:44:51 AM
By all means, Mippy, keep enjoying the comments here, and let us know what's good on TV -- so we'll know which past season discs to get from Netflix.  My 16-year-old VCR still works, sort of, so I do record a little, if rarely.  Usually something like PBS Masterpiece.

What is it about some of these golden olden black and whites that make them so enjoyable to watch?  Last night a watched The Young PHiladelphians (saw it a million years ago) with Paul Newman and Barbara Rush(?).  Her name is vaguely familiar.  And Billie Burke.  Very enjoyable.

JimNT, I liked There Will Be Blood, but felt that some things just didn't fit right -- can't remember just what.  But I do remember there were several comments from folks who were disappointed that so much of U. Sinclair's Oil had been changed.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on October 30, 2010, 10:39:03 PM
pedln:  Remember the adage "Never read the book before seeing the movie and vice versa".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on October 31, 2010, 09:13:31 AM
"Never read the book before seeing the movie and vice versa".

Usually if I've read the book and then see the movie I've read so many other books in between that I've completely forgotten what the book was about that I enjoy the movie as a separate thing. so I never really have a problem. I very rarely say the book was better. Don't forget everyone that reads a book sees the characters looking differently.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on October 31, 2010, 11:39:03 AM
From the Seattle Times  -- 10 of the creepiest movies ever for Halloween.  I don’t know if I’ve seen Night of the Hunter, included in the list, but I remember my mother talking about it years ago, the evil Robert Mitchum with LOVE and HATE on his fingers.

Movies for a Scary Night (http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/movies/2013275942_halloweenfilms31.html?prmid=obinsite)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on November 03, 2010, 09:30:36 PM
Thanks for that link pedln.  Wondering why they didn't add "The Exorcist"?  One of the few cases where the movie and book are equally good.  I remember reading an adaptation of "The Exorcist" in an American Cosmopolitan an aeon ago.  I rushed out to buy the book, but it hadn't been released in Australia yet (things were pretty slow in OZ in those days  ;)).  I waited patiently and the paperback copy still sits in my bookcase.  Robert Mitchum was fantastic - did anyone see him in "Dead Man" with Johnny Depp?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 04, 2010, 08:38:45 AM
 Has Johnny Depp been around that long?  I thought Robert Mitchum died before Depp arrived on
the Hollywood scene.  I think Mitchum was my first girlish love...and how long ago was that!  ::)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on November 04, 2010, 10:53:12 AM
Yep, Babi.  They were in the movie together.  Listed below is the cast.  I loved the movie for a couple of reasons:  Iggy Pop is memorable; but Neil Young's soundtrack was sublime.  The movie is not your average Hollywood version, but that only makes it better. 

William Blake - JOHNNY DEPP
Nobody - GARY FARMER
Cole Wilson - LANCE HENRIKSEN
Conway Twill - MICHAEL WINCOTT
Thell Russell - MILI AVITAL
Salvatore "Sally" Jenko - IGGY POP
Benmont Tench - JARRED HARRIS
Big George Drakoulious - BILLY BOB THORNTON
Train Fireman - CRISPIN GLOVER
Johnny "The Kid" Pickett - EUGENE BYRD
Nobody's Girlfriend - MICHELLE THRUSH
Charlie Dickenson - GABRIEL BYRNE
John Scofield - JOHN HURT
Trading Post Missionary - ALFRED MOLINA
John Dickenson - ROBERT MITCHUM
Marvin (Older Marshall) - JIMMIE RAY WEEKS
Lee (Younger Marshall) - MARK BRINGELSON
Man with Gun in Alley - GIBBY HAYNES
Man at End of Street - GEORGE DUCKWORTH
Man with Wrench - RICHARD BOES
Old Man with Wanted Posters - MIKE DAWSON
1st Man at Trading Post - JOHN PATTISON
2nd Man at Trading Post - TODD PFEIFFER
Makeh Village - LEONARD BOWECHOP, CECIL CHEEKA, MICHAEL McCARTY
First Young Nobody - THOMAS BETTLES
Second Young Nobody - DANIEL CHAS STACY
Drunk - PETER SCHRUM
Mr. Olafsen - JOHN NORTH

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 04, 2010, 11:13:52 AM
Our first movie "loves": 

Anyone here fall madly in love with Shepard Strudwick? or Jeff Chandler?  Loved those guys with silver in their hair! 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on November 04, 2010, 01:39:09 PM
Don't know Sturdwick, but did love Jeff Chandler and Stewart Granger.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 05, 2010, 08:20:51 AM
Mitchum was listed way down the line, I see. I suppose that means this was a small role later in life for him.  I see John Hurt is in there, too. Quite a cast, all together.
  I don't know Sturdwick, either. Like MARYZ, I did love Chandler and Granger.  What are some films Sturdwick made?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 05, 2010, 11:58:36 AM
Biography for
Shepperd Strudwick More at IMDbPro »
ad feedback
Date of Birth
22 September 1907, Hillsboro, North Carolina, USA


Date of Death
15 January 1983, New York City, New York, USA (cancer)


Birth Name
Jr. Shepperd Strudwick


Mini Biography
Actor Sheppard Strudwick had dark, dignified, matinée-styled good looks but with a slightly shady countenance that may have prevented him from attaining top "leading man" stardom in films. Nevertheless he earned distinguished marks in a number of films and returned most frequently to his first love, the theater, throughout his career.

The North Carolina native was born Shepperd Strudwick, Jr. on September 22, 1907, the son of a cotton mill executive. The scion of a prominent family that settled in Hillsborough, his descendants were comprised of doctors, scientists, architects, actors and painters, one of which, Edmund Charles Fox Strudwick, a physician, earned distinction as the first president of the North Caorlina Medical Society. Following high school Strudwick attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with designs on becoming a writer. At one point he was on the editorial staff of his college magazine. In between studies he also joined the university's drama club, the Carolina Playmakers, and ultimately decided to switch his major to drama.

Appearing in a number of college productions before his graduation, Strudwick moved to New York in 1928 to pursue a professional career. Almost immediately he won small parts in two Broadway plays, "The Yellow Jacket" and "Falstaff," both starring the shows' producer Charles Coburn and his wife, actress Ivah Wills. He followed those with "Under the Gaslight" (1929) and "The Life Line" (1930). Throughout the 1930s Strudwick enhanced a number of Broadway and regional productions, notably "Both Your Houses" (1933) "Let Freedom Ring" (1935) and Shakespeare's "As You Like It" (1937), the last in which he starred as Orlando. The Shakespearean cast included his first wife, actress Helen Wynn, whom he had married in May of 1936. The couple later appeared together in a 1939 Broadway production of "The Three Sisters" in which he played Vershinin and she Olga. Helen became the mother of his only child, Sheppard Strudwick III.

In the late 1930s, at the age of 31, Strudwick was summoned to Hollywood with a strong theatrical reputation preceding him. MGM hired him and he eventually gained some notice for his debonair portrayals of Southern-styled gents. He tested, in fact, for the part of Ashley Wilkes in Gone with the Wind (1939) but lost the role to Leslie Howard. At MGM his first two roles were biographical shorts, portraying noted Hungarian physician Ignaz Semmelweis in the Oscar-winning biographical short That Mothers Might Live (1938) and the infamous 19th century Mexican bandit Joaquin Murrieta (1938). He then began to go through the supporting paces in secondary feature films. These included the romantic comedy Fast Company (1938) starring Melvyn Douglas and a couple of popular film series' entries: Congo Maisie (1940) starring Ann Sothern and Dr. Kildare's Strange Case (1940) headlining Lew Ayres and Lionel Barrymore. His last picture for MGM was the aviation film Flight Command (1940) starring Robert Taylor.

Strudwick changed both studios and his marquee moniker in 1941 after signing up with 20th Century Fox. Given the more suitable "leading man" name of John Sheppard, he nevertheless continued to use his real name under the New York stage lights. Tall and aristocratic-looking with a sleepy-eyed handsomeness, he characters seemed to induce suspicion or skepticism as to their intentions. At 20th he demonstrated "second lead" potential opposite some of the silver screen's most beautiful stars of the time: Gene Tierney, Loretta Young, Claudette Colbert and Carole Landis among them, but was unable to rise to the top romantic star ranks. His best chance came starring as the acutely melancholy poet in The Loves of Edgar Allan Poe (1942) opposite Linda Darnell. Despite his abilities and fine work, however, he remained a second-tier performer.

By the post-war years, Shepperd was firmly entrenched in character roles, usually playing patrician fathers, corrupt politicians, reverends or sober-faced professional types. Parts in such film greats as Joan of Arc (1948), All the King's Men (1949) and A Place in the Sun (1951) came his way. A member in good standing at the Actors Studio, where he met his second wife, actress Margaret O'Neill, Strudwick went back to using his real name in both stage and film outings once his "leading man" chances had passed.

He made a strong return to Broadway in the 1950s in both comedic and dramatic productions including "Affairs of State" (1950), "The Bat" (1953), "The Ladies of the Corridor" (1953), "The Night Circus" (1958) and "Only in America" (1959). In 1962 he portrayed George in the matinée productions of the landmark Edward Albee drama "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" on Broadway and eventually took over the part in August of 1963.

Frequently on TV he was a regular dramatic guest player throughout the 1960s and 1970s on such shows as "The Twilight Zone," "The Defenders", "McMillan and Wife" and "The Name of the Game". He also joined the daytime drama circuit playing both stand-up gents and shady ones on such serials as "As the World Turns" (1956) and "Another World" (1964). He also had Emmy-nominated turns on the soaps "One Life to Live" (1968) and "Love of Life" (1951).

Sheppard capped his theatrical career with a Tony-nominated featured performance in "To Grandmother's House We Go" in 1981. Following his last acting part on a 1982 TV episode of "Nurse", Sheppard took ill and died of cancer in New York City on January 15, 1983. He was survived by both his son and his fourth wife, Mary Jeffrey, whom he married in 1977.

IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh / gr-home@pacbell.net


Spouse
Mary Jeffrey (1977 - 15 January 1983) (his death)
Jane Straub (1958 - ?) (divorced)
Margaret O Neill' (1947 - ?) (divorced)
Helen Wynn (10 May 1936 - ?) (divorced) 1 child


Trivia
Died almost six months before Ernest Graves, who was the first Victor Lord on "One Life to Live" (1968) before Strudwick took over the role in 1974.

Was nominated for Broadway's 1981 Tony Award as Best Actor (Featured Role - Play) for "To Grandmother's House We Go."

Producer David O. Selznick asked him to test for the role of Ashley in Gone with the Wind (1939).

The athletic-oriented actor enjoyed swimming and tennis along with reading (Hemingway and Steinbeck were his favorite authors).

Another member of his college dramatic club the Carolina Playmakers was bandleader Kay Kyser. He and Sheppard remained friends long after both made it to Hollywood.
There was no picture unfortunately on IMDb
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on November 05, 2010, 05:24:38 PM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


Alas, life is full of disappointments.  After seeing There Will Be Blood I was certain that Daniel Day would rank as one of my movie hero's, and I still feel that he is a wonderful actor.  However, James Fenimore Cooper's books should never be allowed to screen.  The Last of the Mohican's movie was a monumental bore.  I read the book some years ago and while I wouldn't rank it a classic, as many readers do, it was a fine book.  I ended the evening watching Wesley Snipes couched in a multi story bldg taking potshots at people associated with the weapons industry.  I thought old Wesley made his living using those weapons??
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on November 05, 2010, 10:55:16 PM
JimNT - We obviously have different tastes in movies. 

Babi - I did a bit of research on Robert Mitchum and "Dead Man".  "Dead Man" was directed by Jim Jarmusch and released in 1995.  Robert Mitchum died July 1, 1997.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 06, 2010, 09:18:49 AM
Ah, that explains why I'm not familiar with Sheppard Strudwick. By
the time I was old enough to go to movies and care who the actors were,
Strudwick was playing character roles.  And his best work appears to
have been on stage. My introduction to stage plays was around age 8-9,
from a traveling troupe that came through once a year.  If I remember correctly,
they were called the "Madcap Players".
  Thanks, ROSE.  I was sure it must have been late in Mitchum's life/career.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on November 08, 2010, 09:55:46 AM
I viewed The Diary of Anne Frank last eve.  I've read the book and seen the movie some years ago, probably more than once, and  I find it to be a very fascinating, but tragic story.  I've never had the least doubt about the atrocities committed by the Nazi regime upon the Jewish people during the 30s and 40s while our country looked the other way. But that's another story.  I seem to remember that the Anne Frank diary has been the subject of much research and discussion in the past but I can't remember if it has ever been officially documented by recognized historians.  Have any of you some thoughts and references on the subject?  I'm about to "google" it and hopefully find some data there. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on November 08, 2010, 10:50:56 PM
Jim, I've seen a couple of versions of The Diary of Anne Frank and we read the recently released "original" version of the book during one of our PBS discussions here in April when PBS broadcast a new production (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/annefrank/index.html).

There is some information at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Frank#Denials_and_legal_action, with footnotes, about the diary's authenticity.

There are links to other resources on the PBS site at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/annefrank/index.html
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on November 09, 2010, 10:26:12 AM
Marcie:  Thank you.  I did "google" the book/movie, but I wanted to know more and I'll review your references.  The ink and paper Anne used were authentic for the period.  Otto, her father, had the book published in 1947 which was hugely successful.  Being a cynical old geezer, I couldn't help but wonder about his motivations.  But given the pain and suffering endured by him and his family and friends, I feel a bit guilty about even the slightest doubt.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 09, 2010, 11:06:02 AM
Marcie, thanks for those links.  And Jim, you got me looking too, to see what else could be found.  If you google "Otto Frank" you may find some more, or perhaps you have.  Amazon describes a book The Hidden Life of Otto Frank.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 09, 2010, 11:14:15 AM
Please Vote for Me.

Have you had enough of that?  This is a Chinese documentary -- about three 8-year-olds running for Class Monitor of the Third Grade, complete with campaign committees, debates, earmarks, and of course helicoptering parents. Their techniques and language were fascinating.  You definitely know you're in China.

I had read a short blurb about it in yesterday's NYT, and since it was less than an hour long, I streamed it from Netflix to my computer.  Very interesting and sometimes a hoot.  With English subtitles.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on November 09, 2010, 11:34:35 AM
Pedln, what a documentary. Thank you for mentioning it. I was able to see a bit of it on youtube. The 3 minute beginning is at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCEB-uH49AQ and there is some back-room (backstabbing!) campaigning at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwARnU2xrao&feature=related. Gosh, the first taste of democracy
for the third graders is not so different from our own politicking.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on November 11, 2010, 11:32:28 AM
My wife and I saw the movie Hereafter yesterday.  Kathleen Kennedy and Stephen Speilberg were two of the executive producers, directed by Clint Eastwood, and starring Matt Damon.  All the right names, huh?  Damon played a reluctant pyschic and performed well, as I believe he usually does.  The guitar music soundtrack was written by Eastwood and was beautiful.  The movie has some slow scenes that I'm not sure could have been done better given the subject.  Eastwood is a very talented man and seems to give his movies a magic touch.  Despite the slow scenes, I think one should see this movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on November 11, 2010, 10:47:38 PM
Thanks for the review of Hereafter, Jim. I've seen some previews and have been wondering about it. It's good to know that you've given it a thumbs up.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 12, 2010, 12:08:04 PM
The friend who accompanied me to see Hereafter, commented that her daughter said it was "slow".  However, she and I did not find it slow at all, and totally enjoyed it.  It was, IMHO, sad, uplifting and thought provoking. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on November 12, 2010, 05:34:36 PM
Tomereader1:  I enjoyed your review of Hereafter. Frankly, I fibbed; it was my wife who said there were some slow scenes.  I thoroughly enjoyed it and plan to view it again when it debuts on Netflix.  I might not even invite my wife.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on November 12, 2010, 10:01:22 PM
 :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 14, 2010, 10:05:19 AM
It's on my queue now, Jim.


Here’s for the Harry Potter fans.  Just how long would it take to watch all of them in one day?

Six in One Day (http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/movies/2013399863_potter14.html)


I borrowed the grandkids’ DVDs and kept them a year.  Watched two, guess I’m not a fan.  Maybe I'll try it again when they've all left home.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on November 14, 2010, 09:19:09 PM
I'm definitely a Harry Potter fan, from the books first, and secondarily from the movies.  Thanks,  Pedln, for the link.  I won't watch all the movies in one day, but maybe it's time for me to do some rereading in preparation for the very soon to be released next segment.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on November 14, 2010, 10:00:21 PM
We've read all the books, but have seen only 4 of the movies.  We have the rest in our Netflix queue, so we'll be ready when the latest one is released on DVD.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on November 15, 2010, 02:04:53 AM
My husband has the dubious distinction of falling asleep in the first H Potter film.

I have read some of the books to my younger daughter - but a couple of years ago she decided that she had had enough of my reading aloud and wanted to do it herself; I was redundant  :(.  However, reading them aloud does draw your attention to the flaws - JK Rowling, whom I admire greatly for her achievements in the face of real adversity - has a habit of repeating the same adjectives over and over again, and as for adverbs!  If I read that Hermione said something "shrilly" one more time......Someone once said that JKR "never met an adverb that she didn't like".

I have also seen some of the films at the cinema with the children.  They are OK, but I wouldn't rush - although I have already agreed to take daughters to the latest, which is on general release here from Friday.  My in-laws, who are in their 80s, absolutely love H Potter - they are into science fiction (mother-in-law is a great fan of Terry Pratchett, and despairs of me who can't stand him), so maybe that's why.

Does anyone else miss reading aloud to their children?  I used to love doing the voices for characters like Ann of Green Gables until one of my daughter's friends told me that her Mummy did it much better!

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on November 15, 2010, 06:53:19 AM
Question for all you H. Potter fans:  Are any of the DVD's suitable gifts for grandchildren (ages 6-9)?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 15, 2010, 09:08:08 AM
 PatH, I'm so glad to hear the next Harry Potter film will be released 'very soon'.
I'd about given up and decided it would never happen.
  ROSEMARY, I suspect that being read to is somewhat like reading the book before the movie.
'Mummy' has her way of voicing the different characters and the young listener feels that is
the way they are supposed to sound.  Other 'voices' don't fit, much like the characters in the
movie don't really look/sound the way we envisioned them from the book.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on November 15, 2010, 10:06:21 AM
Rosemary:  My kids are beginning to read to me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 15, 2010, 10:17:59 AM
Quote
Does anyone else miss reading aloud to their children?  I used to love doing the voices for characters like Ann of Green Gables until one of my daughter's friends told me that her Mummy did it much better

If only ALL parents would read to their children, and talk about what they're reading. Talk about the pictures, talk about the story.  As my mother used to say, it's important for their "reading readiness."  Even when they are able to read, kids like to be read to.  Improves listening skills, too.  Adults, too -- I remember a college children's lit class, and the prof read The Trumpeter of Krakow to us.

I remember someone saying it was a lunch time ritual at their house.  Mom would read aloud while the kids ate lunch.  (That probably beats listening on the radio to Stella Dallas, a  girl from a little mining town in the West .   .    .)

Quote
Are any of the DVD's suitable gifts for grandchildren (ages 6-9)?

Mippy, the first time I watched a Harry Potter years ago I thought it was scary, but I felt safe with granddaughter Lizzie who was about 5 then, and it was all old hat to her.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on November 15, 2010, 02:08:41 PM
Stella Dallas????  I don't remember her or the Green Hornet, or The Squeaking Door, or Jack Armstrong, The All American Boy, or etcetera.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on November 15, 2010, 02:17:40 PM
JimNT -  :D.  think I'll try suggesting that.  My son's now ex girlfriend used to get him to read to her down the phone at night (they lived in different cities) - I always used to wonder why, as he is not exactly a fluent out-loud reader - then he told me it helped her to get to sleep!

When I was very small, lunchtime (or really, just after lunchtime) was Listen With Mother on the radio, which always began "Are you sitting comfortably?  then I'll begin.....".  Later it was Watch with Mother on the television, my favourites being The Woodentops and Andy Pandy.  For my son it was Postman Pat (which I liked), for my first daughter The Tweenies (which were very funny if you were an adult) and for my second daughter, the Teletubbies, which I absolutely loathed, along with every other parent I knew.

I'm looking forward to reading to grandchildren one day, though by the time they materialise I'll probably be in my dotage....

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on November 15, 2010, 08:12:47 PM
My grandson, who is not fond of reading, has become hooked on the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series, and i see there is a movie in the works. Oh, btw, he's 8 yrs old......jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on November 15, 2010, 08:56:16 PM
I came from a family where reading aloud was a way of life.  We didn't just get bedtime stories, we would also take turns reading aloud to entertain someone doing stuff like ironing, or just for fun.  We worked through a tremendous number of books, some of them a bit too grown-up for JoanK and me, but I've always been glad for the start it gave me, and the fun it was.

Rosemarykaye, fortunately my children were almost grown up when teletubbies came along, but I tried to watch them once and didn't even last 5 minutes before the retch factor got too high.

I'm a huge Harry Potter fan.  For the last 3 or 4 books, I even went to local bookstores to stand in line to buy the next book at midnight, along with teenagers and overtired younger children with  their parents.  (I also like Terry Pratchett, he's one of the funniest writers I know.)  The latest movie will be released here Friday also.

In spite of your very justified complaints about Rowling's adjectives and adverbs, Rowling does read well aloud.  When my husband was sick, he couldn't focus well to read, so I read all sorts of things to him, including the first 5 Harry Potter books (all that had been published at the time).  It was interesting to see what books did well: Sherlock Holmes was good, but Agatha Christie was poor. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 16, 2010, 08:09:10 AM
You owe the author of "The Wimpy Kid" a debt of gratitude, JEAN. Thank goodness for
the books, whichever ones they are, that capture the imagination of a kid and start
him/her reading!
  Agatha Christie made poor out-loud reading?  I never would have thought of that, but
considering how pompous Poirot could sometimes be, I can imagine how he would sound
read out loud.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on November 16, 2010, 08:34:46 AM
I was surprised too, Babi.  Perhaps my choice of which books was unfortunate, but Christie's prose seemed quite wooden when read aloud.  I guess it's not so noticeable when read silently and rapidly.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on November 16, 2010, 08:57:40 AM
Am an unabashed HARRY POTTER fan, as well.  The words she uses describe the story she is telling, and the story is the epitome of vivid imagination.  She has also made up a lot of delightful words, and I am addicted to the clever game Quidditch, which bloomed totally from Rowling's head.

Two of my daughters (have 5) and I went to one of the book store midnight parties.  Believe it was for book 4, the one that opens on June 21.  Whichever book, we got there at eleven PM on June 20, and sipped drinks while watching the excited throng of children.  First in line?  A fortyish man, who bought 4 books and had them in 2 bookstore bags and was grinning from ear to ear as he made off with his (paid for them, of course) loot!

Have loved the movies, and will see movie number 7, part one, on the Sunday after Thanksgiving with a daughter and granddaughter I have seen every one with!  We 3 generations are like the same generation when we take our traditional troop to the moving picture theatre for a new Harry Potter film!

And, of course, I own every movie on DVD.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on November 16, 2010, 11:21:44 AM
I remember seeing the first Harry Potter film in a holiday coastal town of about 100 residents.  I even remember what I was wearing.  In holiday mode I was wearing just a loungi (sarong I guess is what you would call it); knickers; rubber thongs and a suntan. It was a midday matinee and the majority of women in the audience were dressed similarly.  The men were dressed in board shorts and rubber thongs, and the kids were dressed like the adults.  My fondest memory of the  film was the white owl (called Hedwig as I recall, altho I may be wrong) who delivered so many letters to Harry.  I love owls - they are my totem I suppose. 

My oldest grandson was frightened of Voldemort/Valdemort (unsure of the spelling) - he was just ten when he developed this fear.  When he told me I took him aside and showed him a pic of Ralph Fiennes on my photostream on Flickr.  I asked him what his opinion was of Ralph - Jack replied that Ralph was very handsome and had beautiful eyes.  I told him that was what Voldemort really looked like - that it was all make-up that made him appear evil and as tho he had no nose.  My grandson learned a lesson that day - that many things are never what they seem.  He now sees through Voldemort's disguise and enjoys Harry Potter movies more.

I remember (and have never forgotten) a movie I saw when I was quite young about a puppet that was only ever seen in shadow terrorising a person/family.  At that time it was the most frightening image I had ever seen, although I could never explain why.  Does anyone else have similar disquieting memories of movies seen when young?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on November 16, 2010, 12:14:50 PM
roshanarose - I don't remember any frightening films, but when I was about 3 my parents saved up and bought me a life size Looby Loo doll (a character in Andy Pandy).  they left it in the box and brought me into the room to open it - I opened the lid and ran screaming from the room.  I remember it as if it was yesterday - the yellow sofa, the long brown box, and the scary rag doll face looking out at me.  My poor parents were really hard up and had no doubt scrimped and saved to buy that doll, but I never liked it.

When we first moved to this house, Madeleine was also 3, and the horrible boy next door (long since moved away) put the severed head of his sister's doll into our sandpit.  She was so traumatised I could cheerfully have severed his head in revenge  ;)

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on November 16, 2010, 08:51:21 PM
The little boy next door - the bane of many a toddler.  He is most likely now a surgeon ::)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on November 17, 2010, 01:59:04 AM
 ;D  what a thought!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 17, 2010, 08:45:01 AM
Oh, yes, ROSHANA. I well remember the giant tarantula that terrified me in a Tarzan
movie. Surprisingly, I was more angry than relieved when my mother explained that it
was a fake. I felt betrayed!
  As for the brat who cut off the doll's head and left it in the sandbox,  I can't help hoping
he didn't wind up a serial killer.  Something like that is a big red warning flag to me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on November 17, 2010, 11:48:47 AM
As a youngster, I loved the Tarzan movies and read the books with a flashlight under my bed covers when I was supposed to be sleeping.  It never occured to me, but someone asked why Tarzan in the movies was beardless.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on November 17, 2010, 10:06:01 PM
Re frightening films, it's interesting how age affects ones imagination.  About 1964 or 5, William Castle produced a movie starring Joan Crawford titled Strait Jacket.  My wife and I saw it in Houston, Tx and witnessed dozens of people leaving the theater until only a handful remained.  We were terrified too but were determined to see it through.  Today that movie causes hardly a blip on our fright scale; in fact, few movie do frighten us if any.  In a sense, I miss the fun of being frightened by movies.  It was innocent fun and unlike the real life atrocities we are bombarded with today.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 18, 2010, 11:23:38 AM
Frightening Movies:  I can remember one from when I was pretty young; Title escapes me, but I think it starred Peter Lorre, and was about a hand that crept around, and something to do with the piano.
The absolute scariest was when I was about 18-19 and "Psycho" came out.  I went to the movie with about 3 or 4 other young ladies that I worked with. We stayed for the entire show, but I was so frightened, I couldn't sleep for several days afterward!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on November 18, 2010, 06:32:28 PM
It was several months before I could take a shower--had to bathe in an open tub!   Psycho was a really scary movie.
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on November 18, 2010, 09:50:18 PM
Tomereader - The Peter Lorre movie you mentioned:

The Beast with Five Fingers 1946
"
"There's some underhanded business going at the gloomy mansion of former piano virtuoso Francis Ingram (Victor Francen) in this mystery set in rural Italy in the early 1900s. Confined to a wheelchair and only able to use one hand to play, the bitter Ingram lives with his devoted nurse (Andrea King); an antiques dealer (Robert Conrad), and a craven secretary (Peter Lorre). When Ingram is killed in a mysterious accident, some dislikable British relatives (Charles Dingle and John David) come to claim the mansion, but find more than they bargained for when Ingram's disembodied hand starts crawling from the grave at night to play piano, and strangle horrified victims.

Robert Florey (MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE) directed this odd combination of "old dark house" mystery and rural Italian period piece. The highlights are Lorre's priceless scenes of confrontation with the disembodied hand, and the starkly beautiful photography that captures every creepy shadow from the fireplace's flickering flames. Max Steiner did the toweringly horrific score. Curt Siodmak (THE WOLFMAN) wrote the screenplay based on a short story by William Fryer Harvey."

Deliciously scary.  

My daughter wouldn't drink milk for months after seeing "Alien".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 19, 2010, 08:17:47 AM
 You never know how kids are going to take things.  My aunt told the story of taking her 5-yr
daughter to see Godzilla, only to be horrified to find the monster picking up people from the
street and popping them in his mouth.  She turned to her daughter, fearful that she had seriously
traumatized the child. My young cousin, however, simply popped more popcorn in her own
mouth and said, "Well, he got one."
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on November 19, 2010, 10:05:12 AM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)





I remember going with a little friend in the summer of 1940 to the outdoor theatre at Fort Knox, Kentucky to see Dr. Cyclops, and being so terrified that I had to run into the ladies to get away from the film.  I was 11.  Betty Jane was a year younger, but she sat through it all!  Well, we keep in touch still, and to this very day she is more serene than I!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on November 19, 2010, 04:12:11 PM
And does everyone remember the flying monkeys in "The Wizard of OZ"? I was about six, and I hid under the movie seat.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on November 19, 2010, 10:35:39 PM
Babi - Cute story about the popcorn.  I went to see Jurassic Park, alone.  My grandkids were just babies then.  I pride myself on not being easily shocked or frightened in horror movies, but the scene where the velociraptors were chasing the kids around the kitchen absolutely terrified me.  I looked around the theatre and saw the shining eyes of appreciative children.  One little boy sitting next to me was saying "Hope they get those kids".  Obviously a different sensibility from mine.

Ooooh yes JoanK those monkeys still scare me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 20, 2010, 08:39:28 AM
 Obviously, ROSE, that boy enjoyed being scared.  I suppose it is thrilling, when you know you're
really perfectly safe.  In my mind, now, something like Stephen King's books are much  more
frightening. (Which is why I stopped reading them.)   I know I'm in no danger from velociraptors,
but King's horrors emerged from quite ordinary things, and people, that one runs into every day.
Now that's frightening.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on November 20, 2010, 01:06:47 PM
Our son was 3 or 4 y/o when we took he and his older sister into Philly to see the play The Wiz. He got so frightened when the crazy monkies appeared that i had to take him out into the hallway until the monkies w ere gone. He sat in my lap for the rest of the show and kind of peeked at the stage. To this day he is like you Babi, he doesn't like any horror story that could come out of ordinary everyday life, altho he'll watch extraordinary things like monsters and aliens.......jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on November 20, 2010, 03:02:45 PM
Whatever it is that makes people enjoy being scared, I lack it. I avoid horror movies like the plague!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on November 20, 2010, 07:02:36 PM
Babi, I haven't read Stephan King for years for the very reason you mentioned.  I especially don't read or watch anything like that since my husband died 2 years ago.  Much more scary when you live alone!
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on November 20, 2010, 07:17:46 PM
This is a total change of subject.  In the literary game "Author, Author", I had occasion to review the recent movie of "Beowulf", so I thought I might as well post it here.

A very high-tech movie was made of Beowulf three years ago.  Although they shot most of the scenes live, they then digitalized the actors, which had the effect of making their faces look waxy and blunting the expression (if any) of their acting.  There were also some unfortunate plot choices.  The mother of the marauder Grendel is Angelina Jolie, dressed in nothing but gold paint and high heels.  She looks pretty good, but hardly the "monstrous hag" whose blood melts the blade of Beowulf's sword as he slays her.  A couple of times, for a moment or two, quality wins out, and you get the feel of the poem, but it doesn't last.  But if you just want a flashy action flick, it's OK.

When I looked up the date of this movie in IMDB, I learned that there is a 1999 sci-fi movie, a post-apocalyptic retelling of the story.  This I've got to see.  It's in my queue.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on November 21, 2010, 02:28:10 AM
As I may have already mentioned, my mother sat up and watched Psycho alone in our (then) large old and very creaky house a few months after my father had died (I was 8 at the time).  And as I may also have mentioned, I am most definitely not a chip off the old block - I avoid these things like the plague, and recall even being scared to go upstairs in that house after I'd read a Famous Five mystery  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 21, 2010, 08:43:50 AM
I hear you, SALLY.

 Let me know what you think of the sci-fi version, PAT. I don't think I'm at all
interested in the one you described. AJ in gold paint and heels, playing a 'monstrous
hag'?! No, thank you.
  Oh, before I forget.  My daughter Valerie doesn't usually care for the 'period' type English made
shows I love, but she did watch the first of the "Lark Rise to Candleford" series with me.  She
is hooked, and loves it!  We are watching the entire series, one disk at a time from Netflix.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on November 21, 2010, 11:52:01 AM
I'm kind of like your daughter, Babi.  I'm not much for those period pieces, either.  But, on recommendations from here, I've started watching Lark Rise and love it.  I've seen the first two discs, and have the rest scattered through my Netflix queue.  John watched one, but wasn't interested in seeing more.

We visited a friend in England last summer.  She lives in one of those tiny towns in Oxfordshire, kind of like what Lark Rise might be today.  She said that it was filmed in that area, but hasn't seen it to say if she recognizes any specific places.  Maybe she'll get to it sometime.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 21, 2010, 02:09:49 PM
Rosemary, Psycho is one movie I don't ever want to watch again. It's interesting though, how culture adds new words and phrases to our vocabulary.  Just hearing  the words "Norman Brooks" brings an immediate image to mind.

I think I'll pass on the Beowolf, but have added the first Lark Rise to my queue.

Last night I attended the musical Side Show at my granddaughter's high school. It's partly based on the lives of co-joined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton, who at one time were the highest paid women performers in the US. They went on to Hollywood where they made grade B movies --Freaks (1932) and Chained for Life (1951).  Netflix has both.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 21, 2010, 03:51:14 PM
Norman Bates?  Bates Motel?

When I was working (before retirement) our office would have a Halloween costume contest, my last one : I was Mrs. Bates, with Gray wig, black dress, large plastic knife, and my cubicle had a neon sign saying Bates Motel, flashing Vacancy.  It was a ball!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on November 21, 2010, 08:49:52 PM
I watched "Vertigo" again last night.  I think the first time I saw it was in the 60s.  It's strange how you remember the little things, like the coil of hair in Kim Novak's chignon that suggested a whirlpool.  She was so beautiful and Jimmy Stewart fantastic as the troubled hero. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 22, 2010, 08:08:22 AM
I envy you your trip to Oxfordshire, MARYZ.  What little I saw of the country in my
one trip to England wasn't nearly enough.

 Wow!, Tomereader, you really go all out. A neon sign in your cubicle?!! 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 22, 2010, 11:33:46 AM
Babi, it was just a plug-in sign, like neon, about 2 1/2' but really kind of set the stage so to speak!    I also put an adjustable clothes rod that reached from one side of the cubicle entry to the other, and hung a shower curtain on it. Not too many folks were brave enough to open that shower curtain.  Don't think I won first prize, but didn't need to, it was so much fun! 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 23, 2010, 08:30:24 AM
 It was very imaginative, TOMEREADER.  I think you should have gotten at least honorable
mention.  What won first prize, I wonder?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 23, 2010, 01:10:23 PM
I'm not sure who/what won first prize, but I think it was a "group" effort.  Those usually always won, when an entire "team" got together and presented a...guess I'll say "skit" or "show".  We had one where the guys dressed as pallbearers, and they built a cardboard casket, and were putting "someone" away, I think it was some sort of doing away with a particular "product" that we carried.  Anyway, they were wonderful, even carried a boom-box with the "dirge" playing on it!  
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 23, 2010, 02:41:31 PM
You must have brought down the house, Tomereader. It sure sounds like a winner.

It's interesting, that of all the scenes in that film that the shower scene is the one that though the years, has evoked the most reaction from viewers.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on November 23, 2010, 04:30:32 PM
Yep, Pedlin, and that scene was the one that scared the "L" out of me! Halloween was a fun time at the place I worked, only time everyone wasn't backstabbing other departments.  We all just kind of thought up something wild and scary and enjoyed ourselves.  Of course, the catered meals were fun for Thanksgiving and Christmas. We had some neat Superbowl competitions too!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 24, 2010, 11:40:18 AM
Roshanrose, there's something special about those Hitchcock/Jimmy Stewert films.  I like all four of them, but Rear Window has always been my favorite.

Rope
Rear Window
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Vertigo

Are you all planning on seeing any films over the Thanksgiving weekend?  I'm visiting son and family and their lovely 52" TV, but so far we've finished dinner too late to start anything. The TV has not been on since I've arrived.

I've just finished reading Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, and having seen the film last spring, I was really surprised at the book's ending.  Now I have to watch the film again before my f2f book group meets next week to discuss the book.



Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on November 24, 2010, 05:48:39 PM
Don't miss reading the next two in the trilogy;  each is more wonderful than the one before.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on November 27, 2010, 04:40:59 PM
I loved the other three Stewart movies, but I don't remember "Rope".

Does anyone remember Jimmy Stewart's first performance?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 28, 2010, 08:25:11 AM
 "Rope" didn't register with me, either.  Anyone know what that one was about?  I'd go try to
find Jimmy Stewart's first film, but lately I find that side trips mean I can't get return here. So
annoying.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on November 28, 2010, 11:40:52 AM
Babi, just open another window and search there.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on November 28, 2010, 08:59:47 PM
JoanK, in "rope" two youmg men attempt the "perfect murder" of a 3rd, just to see what it's like. Probably reminiscent of Leopold and Loeb in the Bobby Franks murcer.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on November 28, 2010, 09:43:50 PM
There is a listing of James Stewart's filmography at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Stewart_filmography
His first feature film appearance was in 1935 in THE MURDER MAN, a 1935 crime-drama film. It stars Spencer Tracy, Virginia Bruce, and Lionel Atwill, and was directed by Tim Whelan. It was Tracy's first film in what would be a twenty-year career with MGM. Tracy plays an investigative reporter who specializes in murder cases, and involves a somewhat convoluted twist ending. It is most notable for being the feature film debut of James Stewart (who had previously appeared in a short film called Art Trouble). Stewart has sixth billing as another reporter.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on November 28, 2010, 11:23:42 PM
I just heard that Leslie Neilson passed away.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 29, 2010, 08:54:41 AM
MARYZ,  I thought clicking on the http address bar and entering a new address was bringing
up another window.  Is there another way to open a second window? Checking 'Help' was not
helpful.  :-\
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on November 29, 2010, 10:58:06 AM
Babi, I found the following on the Microsoft site

Open Internet Options from Control Panel or from the Tools menu inside Internet Explorer (open Internet Explorer; then click Tools on the menu). Click on the Advanced tab, and look under Browsing. There is a setting there for IE to reuse the window or tab, or open a new window.

Each time the IE icon is clicked on it is automatically set to open a new window of IE by default; also when you have an IE window open, a new window will open if you make sure the setting described above is set.

________________________
Babi, if you open a new window (or tab) after visiting a website, you can't get back to the website using the Back arrow since the new window (or tab) doesn't have the original website in its history. You would have to close the new window or tab to see the original window with the original site.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on November 29, 2010, 11:28:23 AM
Babi, I've found two ways  from this site.  If you click on your or another name, the info page for that person comes up in another window.  Or you can just go to your start menu or however else you get a window and open another one.  I usually don't have my windows full screen, so I can move the window around and get to my desktop shortcut.  Any window you're not actively using can be parked down on the task bar and out of sight.  Does that help? or just confuse you?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on November 30, 2010, 08:20:09 AM
 MARCIE, I used the directions you gave me yesterday,  but I will only know it works if I try it.
 I appreciate you ideas, MARY.  I don't know how I was pulling up info. and then backing up to
return to SL in the past, yet cannot do so now.  I don't know what I'm doing that is different; I
have to suppose something changed.   I don't see 'Home' on my tool bar, but there is a little
blue house that I  must be it. It tells me that Alt + M will also take me 'home'.
  Thank you both for coming to my aid.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on November 30, 2010, 11:18:55 AM
We watched "Up in the Air" with George Clooney on DVD last night.  I saw in the credits that it was based on a book.  Although we love Clooney, and he is a terrific actor, we thought this was a pretty depressing movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on November 30, 2010, 10:59:03 PM
Mary, I don't believe I ever heard of that movie. I did watch another Clooney movie that I kept missing - Michael Clayton. Very interesting. I really liked the scene where he and the horses were standing there staring at each other, that is until the car blew up.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on November 30, 2010, 11:52:43 PM
Michael Clayton is in my Netflix queue also.  This afternoon we watched Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt).  We saw in the credits that it was based on stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald.  An strange movie to be sure, very long (2 3/4 hours), and a beautiful love story.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on December 01, 2010, 02:49:20 AM
MaryZ - I was confused for a minute (nothing new there  :)) - I was thinking of the film "Up", which, so far as I know, did not feature the lovely George.  "Up" was a brilliant film - the dog was so like our old Retriever that he could have modelled for it.  Has anyone else seen it?  The sequence at the beginning, explaining without words the old man's whole life story, is so touching - and the film also has a happy ending, essential for me these days!

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 01, 2010, 08:52:09 AM
 I'll have to add 'Benjamin' and 'Michael' to my queue.  I'll skip "Up in the Air", since MARY warns
us it's depressing. Who needs that?!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 01, 2010, 10:51:44 AM
Rosemarykaye - I have "Up" in my queue, and am definitely looking forward to getting that one.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on December 01, 2010, 11:32:38 AM
Rosemary, yes, I've seen UP. It's a sweet, uplifting film.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on December 01, 2010, 11:55:17 AM
If the movie studios were trying to confuse the viewers, they did a good job, as "Up" and "Up in the Air" both were released at about the same time.  Up being an animated film, and Up in the Air a (depressing) regular film.  I enjoyed "Up" but not so much the Air one.  For all you George lovers, skip Men Who Stare At Goats.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 01, 2010, 02:34:55 PM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)




Thanks for the heads-up about Men Who Stare at Goats.  I think it's in my queue - I'll remove it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 02, 2010, 08:39:30 AM
 Too late, TOMEREADER.  I've already watched that one.  ???
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on December 02, 2010, 09:56:07 AM
My wife and I saw Stolen last eve and found it very engrossing.  We thought that the direction of the paraell events could have been more clearly presented but, nevertheless, the movie was very good.  It's available on Netflix.  Incidentally,  for those of you who prefer a "feel good" movie, this one addresses a disturbing subject and is not uplifting.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 04, 2010, 11:48:03 PM
Guess I'll pass on Goats, but Stolen is now on my Netflix queue.  Thanks for the tips.

The new issue of Time Magazine came today with the Arts section talking about several films recently or soon-to-be released films.  Have any of you seen Black Swan with Natalie Portman playing the part of a ballerina, or Another Year, starring Jim Broadbest and Ruth Sheen as a happy couple with a not so happy bunch of relatives.

I've just finished watching about half of a streamed Angels and Demons (complete with English subtitles  --SDH) on my computer.  I was tempted to shut it down after the first 10 minutes -- too much frenzied hokey, but the scenery and shots of Rome are great, so I'll probably watch the rest of it, even though I don't give a hoot about who are the good guys or the bad guys.  I happened to like the DaVinci Code, but if you didn't like it, you'll really hate this one.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 05, 2010, 12:12:58 AM
We watched Angels and Demons a couple of weeks ago - I thought it was so bad I didn't bother to mention it.  Da Vinci Code was much better but still only just OK.

Last night we put on Zulu - have meant to watch it again for ages.Great film made in 1964 - I thought it moved slowly at first but it held our attention all the way - maybe because it was an actual event that was not too over dramatised and they forgot to lay on lashings of blood and gore. A couple of notable actors Stanley Baker & Jack Hawkins did a great job. It was Michael Caine's first film and no wonder his career took off from then on - he was just brilliant in a couple of scenes. And Richard Burton's voice as narrator to start and end the film - and a good Welsh choir for a few minutes as well. Enjoyed it.  
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on December 05, 2010, 09:56:05 AM
We left the theater after about one-half hour of Angels & Demons.  Awful movie.  And I had really liked the book.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on December 05, 2010, 12:11:30 PM
A friend and I saw "Black Swan" yesterday.  It is movie where you'd best take your Xanax before you go. It will pin you to your seat, and leave you catching your breath.   Portman gives a bravura performance, and if she doesn't win an Oscar for this role, then there is no justice.  A Warning:  It is definitely R rated, sex, language, and some violence.  A lot of what happens, happens in her mind, but we are subjected to what she perceives.  It is NOT for the faint of heart, or the prudish.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on December 05, 2010, 09:24:53 PM
"Black Swan" is definitely on my must-see list.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on December 05, 2010, 11:25:11 PM
Thanks, Tomereader1, for your review of Black Swan. I've been a fan of Natalie Portman. She chooses unusual roles.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 06, 2010, 08:28:10 AM
And "Black Swan" is definitely on my 'forget-about-it' list!  :o
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 06, 2010, 10:34:40 AM
Thanks tomereader for the good news about Black Swan.  It's in my queue for whenever it comes out.

A delightful Christmas film that I used to watch every year, and still have the tape (unfortunately from an era before captions) is Christmas Without Snow starring Michael Learned and that wonderful curmudgeon John Houseman.  It's basically a story about a church in San Francisco that wants to perform Handel's Messiah for Christmas.  Lots of wonderful music (though many reviewers complain about the quality of the DVDs Amazon has to offer) and much interaction among the various characters.

Amazon has a variety of DVDs for this show, and surprisingly, Netflix has it available for streaming, but does not have the DVD.  So, if you're looking for a different kind of holiday feel-good film, this is it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on December 06, 2010, 11:07:31 AM
Now, pedlin, let's don't jump to "good news" about that movie, be sure an re-read my comments/warnings.  It is NOT for the faint-at-heart!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on December 06, 2010, 06:17:25 PM
Thanks to those of you who recommended 84 Charing Cross Road. I borrowed the DVD from my library and enjoyed the film very much. The Anne Bancroft character was funny and Anthony Hopkins was his usual charming self ("usual," that is, when he plays a charming fellow; not a serial killer).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 06, 2010, 06:24:58 PM
Marcie,  you should definitely read the book, too.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on December 06, 2010, 10:42:21 PM
Thanks, maryz. I plan to do that too.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on December 07, 2010, 07:30:03 AM
Marcie, I agree, the book is good.  there is also a sequel I think, when Helene Hanff visited London after 84 Charing Cross Road had been published.  One of the people she meets during that stay is Joyce Grenfell, whose books I have mentioned before.  I do recommend Grenfell highly - her collections of letters and her diaries are great reading.  Her mother came, i think, from your Deep South - ? Virginia (her maiden name was Langhorne), and Joyce's father's family were all Christian Scientists, as was she.  Her aunt was Nancy Astor, the first woman to take her seat in the House of Commons - Nancy's husband, Viscount (Waldorf) Astor, owned Cliveden, and Joyce stayed on the estate for a while when first married. There is a biography of her which is good - forgotten who wrote it! - but I think the letters and diaries are best.  One volume is called "Darling Ma - Letters to her Mother 1932-44", so it goes through most of the war (during which she carried on doing shows in London, plus "war work", and also travelled widely with her accompanist Viola Tunnard, entertaining troops stationed abroad.

we also have a CD of Joyce performing her own sketches, which is brilliant - very funny but also very moving in parts.

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 07, 2010, 10:15:20 AM
You're right, Rosemary - I've just read another of Helene Hanff's books about that time called Q's Legacy.  It's another lovely story about her experiences and interactions with the London bookstore.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on December 07, 2010, 10:44:23 AM
Many thanks, Rosemary and Mary, for those books to add to my reading list. They sound like ones that I will enjoy.

I just found some very funny videos of Joyce Grenfell at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clOdyzP9fcw
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on December 07, 2010, 03:52:16 PM
Oh, they're histerical!! I like the "Eng Lit" ones.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on December 07, 2010, 09:29:36 PM
Yes, I love all of them!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 08, 2010, 08:15:54 AM
 I've noted down Joyce Grenfell's name. I do hope I find some of her books; she sounds delightful.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JimNT on December 09, 2010, 10:21:50 AM
I saw The Next Three Days yesterday and found it entertaining. It's a Russel Crowe movie although Liam Neesom, et al, find their way into the credits.  I wouldn't think this one will receive any special mention among the so called critics but it isn't a waste of time.  I don't recall any blatant sex, violence or language scenes.  The latter moments are tense and maybe a bit overdone but I left feeling I got my money's worth.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 10, 2010, 02:15:52 PM
The Next Three Days is on my queue, Jim.

I thought I kept up with films pretty well, but was really surprised yesterday to read - somewhere -- about a film that will undoubtedly, the review said, get an Oscar nomination.  The King's Speech, with Colin Firth.  About King George VI.  Did he really stutter?  The review referred to his wife as Elizabeth.  I thought the Queen Mum was Mary.  Was she Elizabeth, also?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on December 10, 2010, 04:35:03 PM
Pedln. the Queen Mother was Elizabeth, but being only a queen consort she doesn't count as a number, hence the current queen is Elizabeth II.  Queen Mary was alive when my mother was a child, so I think she must have been the mother of the current queen's father - whenever you see a picture of her she is very tall, erect and sombre, always dressed in black - mourning I suppose.

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on December 10, 2010, 06:16:33 PM
THanks for mentioning the film, pedln. I had not heard of it. I love Colin Firth.

There is some info about The King's Speech in a Wiki article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_King%27s_Speech_%28film%29

The film applies the self-discovery trope as evinced by the play on words of the title, the idiom "The King's English", as a Throne Speech, and as the speech of the protagonist who would have to deliver one.

After the death of his father King George V and the scandalous abdication of his older brother King Edward VIII, Bertie (Colin Firth) who has suffered from a debilitating speech impediment all his life, is suddenly crowned King George VI of England. With his country on the brink of war and in desperate need of a leader, his wife, Elizabeth, the future Queen Mother, arranges for her husband to see an eccentric speech therapist, Lionel Logue. After a rough start, the two delve into an unorthodox course of treatment and eventually form an unbreakable bond. With the support of Logue, his family, his government and Winston Churchill (Timothy Spall), the King will overcome his stammer and deliver a radio-address that inspires his people and unites them in battle.[3]
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 10, 2010, 11:55:00 PM
The King's Speech - looks interesting. It will open here shortly - in fact only yesterday I saw something about 'advance screenings' . Aussie Geoffrey Rush plays the speech therapist and I think another Aussie Guy Pearce plays Edward VIII who abdicated.  Can't quite see Colin firth as King George VI though... The King really did have a speech impediment which at one time was quite severe.

His mother, Queen Mary was born Princess Mary of Teck - she lived at least until after Queen Elizabeth's (her granddaughter) coronation in 1952 or thereabouts.  I remember seeing photographs of her with the rest of the Royals on the balcony of Buck Palace after the ceremony. She was just as Rosemary describes - tall and very erect, but I don't recall her wearing black. My memory of her has her always dressed in very elegant cream or ivory embroidered gowns - but she was often unsmiling. My mother admired her very much - I think the present Queen either takes after her naturally or has tried to emulate her behaviour. Queen Mary was originally engaged to marry the heir to the throne,  Prince Albert who died from influenza or pneumonia - after his death she married his brother who became King George V.

For a time after Queen Elizabeth II ascended the throne there were three women known as " Queen" - Queen Mary who was often referred to as the 'Dowager Queen'  - then the former Queen Consort, Queen Elizabeth known as the "Queen Mother" and finally the present queen herself - Queen Elizabeth II.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on December 11, 2010, 06:58:49 AM
What I most recall about Queen Mary was the magnificent pearl chokers she wore.  The chokers appeared to comprise of at least eight strands.  Only a certain kind of woman could carry off wearing pearls, rather than the pearls wearing her. 

Geoffrey Rush is a favourite of mine.  He grew up and went to school in Brisbane, the city in which I now reside.  To see him at his best imho please watch "Shine".  A true story about a rather remarkable and most definitely unconventional Australian pianist.  You won't regret the experience.  Gum will help me here - was it Rachmaninov that his character played so brilliantly?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 11, 2010, 11:29:29 AM
Roshanarose~ Yep David Helfgott was a mean hand on the piano In the movie ShineThey focussed on the Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No 2. and Geoffrey Rush was brilliant in the role. I happen to think Rush is brilliant and at his best in every role he plays. On occasion, Helfgott still plays piano at a pub in the Perth hills but these days he is far from his prime and still psychologically damaged. He grew up a mile or so from where I lived as a child. We heard him play in his heyday when he showed such promise and have always been saddened that he was just not strong enough.

And Yes, Queen Mary's pearl chokers and ropes were part of her persona. I doubt I've ever seen a photo of her without them - She collected jewellery like there was no tomorrow - more or less obliging people to give them to her or buying at ridiculously low prices. She had jewels set into magnificent brooches and tiaras. Most are now part of the Crown jewels but some are the personal property of the present Queen. There are also stories about her reappropriating collections of valuable items and returning them to the Royal collections. Of course, the great ocean liners we know as Queen Mary  and Queen Mary II were named for her as was Queen Mary Land in Antarctica and I daresay other places as well.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on December 11, 2010, 01:58:13 PM
I am very close in age, I think a year or two younger, to Queen Elizabeth.  I had a fascination as a small child with the then Princess Elizabeth and her little sister, Margaret Rose.  They were often featured in LIFE magazine photographs and in the news reels in the movie theatres.  Also often dressed alike.

Queen Mary, who was of royal blood, took it upon herself to personally train Elizabeth to be queen from 1936 on.  There were a lot of little anecdotes about this relationship back then.

Elizabeth and Margaret Rose's mother, later the Queen Mother, was indeed also Elizabeth.  She was Scottish and born Bowes-Lyon.  Not royal.  Her marriage to the second son, Bertie (later George VI) was a love match, and no one ever expected him to become king!  And yes, he had a perfectly dreadful speech impediment.

The first born, whom the family called David, chose the name Edward when George V (husband to Queen Mary) died.  Edward VIII.  He was known and admired world over:  handsome, charming beyond belief, rich, dashing, and Prince of Wales.  Oh, and a womanizing bachelor.  He literally traveled the world on behalf of his country.

In this country, our newspapers were FULL of the scandal of his preferring a twice-divorced American nobody from Baltimore.  Much speculation as to what would happen.  Important Brits quoted as saying he could not remain king if he married her.

But, except for royal and government circles in the know, the public in Great Britain knew NOTHING!  The newspapers loved their king, and agreed to keep it quiet.  So you can imagine the shock and disbelief when the king abdicated with his famous "The Woman I Love" speech!  I can remember listening to it on the radio with my family.  Americans were dying to know how it would all play out, and, while we felt the same way then about the scandal of divorce, we also felt a bit miffed that our American was considered unfit to be Queen!

It was all brand new, however, in Great Britain;  and very upsetting.  The new king was an unknown quality;  though the little princesses were well known and loved.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on December 11, 2010, 02:07:36 PM
By the way, the film The King's Speech, is not about King Edward's famous abdication speech.  Edward VIII had no speech impediment.  It is all about his brother, Bertie, known as George VI.  Except for his inability to speak well and his frail health, George VI was a hundred times the man his brother was;  and his subjects came to realize and appreciate this truth.  Especially during and after WWII.  He died a much loved man.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on December 14, 2010, 06:18:34 PM
I remember reading the comment somewhere that having to be king ruined George V life (I assume he was ubhappy with the role). Have any of you heard that?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on December 14, 2010, 07:46:30 PM
JoanK - Yes I have heard that.  Evidently he was painfully shy and the thought of appearing in public so often, terrified him.  That's probably why he had Geoffrey Rush come in to work on his stammer.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 15, 2010, 12:47:46 AM
Yes, George VI really didn't want to be King - but he was true blue and I doubt anyone else could have done a better job in such difficult wartime circumstances. MaryPage put it so succinctly:

George VI was a hundred times the man his brother was;  and his subjects came to realize and appreciate this truth

King George's wife, Elizabeth, the late Queen Mum once said of Wallis Simpson that 'that woman killed my husband' which perhaps refers to the stress being King placed on her 'Bertie' although in actual fact George died of lung cancer caused by heavy smoking. He was only 56 years of age.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 15, 2010, 09:09:10 AM
 Heavy smoking is often indicative of a high level of stress, so...   Maybe
there was a link between the two.  It's easier to blame someone else
than to be angry with your loved one for a habit that took them away
from you so soon.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 15, 2010, 10:04:57 AM
And now The King's Speech is up for Golden Globe Best Drama.  It's on my queue, as is The Social Network.  And how about Mark Zucherberg being Time's Person of the Year.

Does anyone else feel like they're almost forced into becoming a Facebook member?

Have you seen any of the GG nominees?

MOVIES
 Best Picture - Drama
"Black Swan"
"The Fighter"
"Inception"
"The King's Speech"
"The Social Network"
 
Best Picture - Musical or Comedy
"Alice in Wonderland"
"Burlesque"
"The Kids are All Right"
"Red"
"The Tourist"
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 15, 2010, 11:17:14 AM
pedln, RED is the only one of those movies I've seen - and it's wonderful!

Did you know that True Grit was a book before John Wayne made the movie?  I didn't until  I read about  it in the current Newsweek.  That writer says the book is ever so much better than Wayne's movie.  He also says that the new True Grit movie with Jeff Bridges is better than the first one.  I'm looking forward to seeing that one (love Jeff Bridges), and have ordered the book from Amazon.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on December 15, 2010, 01:58:53 PM
Pedln - Alice In Wonderland is the only one I have seen and I thought it was pretty mediocre, but my daughter loved it and has asked for the DVD for Christmas.

Yes, I feel I have been forced into joining Facebook to find out what my son (who is away for a year) is up to - although my daughter says that no-one puts anything "real" on their "wall" - all the personal stuff is done by private messaging, which makes you wonder why they can't just use e-mail.  I loathe Facebook - the public messages are so inane and pointless.  I am amazed to see some people of my age being so active on it - they seem to have bought into this whole culture that assumes that people want to know what you thought of last night's X-factor, what you had for breakfast, etc.

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 16, 2010, 08:24:47 AM
  Didn't know that, MARYZ. It seems sacrilege against our beloved John Wayne, but I can believe the book is better, ..and possibly the Jeff Bridges version, too.
   I'm with you, ROSEMARY.  So many people seem to be desperate to make any kind of contact
at all, when it seems to me they avoid personal contact by spending all their time focusing on
the little pods in their hands.  We are becoming more and more isolated.  You see people everywhere with their attention focused on their little message machines while ignoring everyone
around them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on December 18, 2010, 12:07:53 AM
Deviating from the theme, sorry but according to NYT there is a TV series called "Eagle Four".  About four Afghan police, it looks quite interesting.  I don't know the TV channel to tell you.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 18, 2010, 01:10:32 PM

Thanks for that Roshanarose.  Very interesting.  It’s partly US funded, TV techniques are taught by a TV crew from Australia.  And it surprised me to learn that there is no Internet available in Afghanistan.  I think the show is available only in Afghanistan.

Eagle Four -- NY Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/21/world/asia/21kabul.html)

Slilde show (http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2010/11/20/world/asia/20101121_KABUL.html)


Eagle Four -- hubpages (http://hubpages.com/hub/Eagle-Four-Afghanistans-24-Hit-TV-Show)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 19, 2010, 08:40:09 AM
 
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


 Aha!  Pedlin, as soon as you said the show was available only in Afghanistan, PEDLN, I was
fairly confident it was propaganda and we were involved.  Apparently it is a good show, tho', and
serves as an educational tool for the police force as well as being popular viewing.  I was shocked
to read that female police officers were afraid of being raped by their own colleagues! And not
at all surprised to learn that a somewhat similar real unit was effectively hamstrung by the
government after they had the temerity to arrest a government aide.
  If we hope to see any major advances in that country, I think we should expect it to take a
couple of generations.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 23, 2010, 06:43:38 PM
Quote
If we hope to see any major advances in that country, I think we should expect it to take a couple of generations.

I think you're right on that, Babi.

I've been nursing a pre-Christmas bug these past few days, but finally felt up to viewing one of the Netflix DVDs that had accumlated here, and it was a Christmas one.  The Family Stone -- did someone mention it here -- I have no idea why I picked it.  About the Stone family, complete with parents, grown children, grandchildren, partners, lovers and all the family dynamics that go with a group of opinionated people.  A little earthy perhaps, funny in spots, sad in others, but completely honest.  Recommended.  With Diane Keaton and Sara Jessica Parker, don't remember the male leads.

I hope you all find a holiday film to your liking.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 24, 2010, 09:02:04 AM
Quote
a group of opinionated people.
  PEDLN, that to me is a warning that get-togethers are generally marked by arguments. Everybody has their own opinions, and rightly so, but 'opinionated' has somewhat the ring of 'constipated' in my mind, with the disposition that
goes with it.    ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on December 24, 2010, 02:40:23 PM
Oh, I just loved The Family Stone.  I have watched it several times now.

MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on December 25, 2010, 07:14:31 AM
   MERRY  CHRISTMAS !!!     
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on December 26, 2010, 11:02:28 AM
We were going to see the new True Grit movie after Christmas dinner yesterday.  But we changed our minds when we got to the theater and saw the jammed parking lot and the line at the window.  I don't like to sit next to someone I do not know at the theater.  The last time I did that someone sat next to me and coughed and chomped on food all during the film.  Disgusting.  I would have left, but we'd paid premium prices to see the film.  I only like to see a film in a theater when there is hardly anyone there.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 26, 2010, 11:54:37 AM
Marj, we usually go on a weekday afternoon, after a movie has been open for a couple of weeks.  Usually there are only a handful of folks.  I like to sit in the back row, so nobody can sit behind me and talk or kick my seat.  ::)  Also, those are the cheap showings.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on December 26, 2010, 01:07:21 PM
Marj - we have one independent cinema here in Aberdeen - it is great, rarely busy, no hotdogs, and you can walk to it - in fact it's much easier to do that as there is no parking anywhere near.  I have a membership of it, which allows me slightly cheaper tickets and some discounts elsewhere, but even without that it is well worthwhile.  They show some mainstream films but also a lot of less popular stuff - they have French seasons, seasons of particular directors' films, etc .  If a film is on elsewhere I very rarely go to it - on occasion I do have to give in for some film that my children want to see, and I always regret it - the noise, the smell, the sheer rudeness of people spoils the whole experience for me.

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 27, 2010, 08:47:41 AM
MARJ, that makes you the ideal person to rent movies and watch them
in the comfort and privacy of your own home.  I have another excellent
reason: the movie theatres don't show closed-captioning.

 ROSEMARY, membership at a movie theatre is a new idea to me. Is that
common in Europe?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on December 27, 2010, 09:20:09 AM
Babi - some of the independent ones do it.  Ours is called The Belmont Cinema, but it is part of a group of independents called Picturehouses (www.picturehouses.co.uk).  You can just "pay as you go" or you can buy an annual membership - for that you get a discount on ticket prices, plus 3 free tickets a year, plus some free previews, etc.  You also get a discount at some local retailers who have joined the scheme - the ones I use most are the cafe opposite the cinema - another independent called Books and Beans (www.booksandbeans.co.uk)- it is a second hand bookshop + cafe, very popular, and the owner lives very near me, he is lovely - and also One Up Records (www.oneupmusic.co.uk), an independent record/CD shop (which is rare in this country and makes me think of The Vinyl Cafe books), again with a very nice friendly owner and helpful staff who don't look at you as if you have crawled out from under a stone if you are over 21  :).  Of course by buying a membership you also help the cinema, which I feel is a good cause as they try to show independent films, old films, unusual stuff, etc - AND they don't sell hotdogs!  they also have a children's club every Saturday morning when they do craft activities then show a children's film, and sometimes they manage to get directors in to do a discussion with the audience .

There is a similar cinema in Edinburgh but I have forgotten its name.

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on December 27, 2010, 01:32:06 PM
Babi said, "MARJ, that makes you the ideal person to rent movies and watch them
in the comfort and privacy of your own home.  I have another excellent
reason: the movie theatres don't show closed-captioning."

I agree, Babi, and that's why I joined Netflix.  But I read a review of True Grit (In the Atlantic, I think), that said the best thing about the film True Grit was the gorgeous scenery and the background music score.  And that is best in a theater.

We usually go on a weekday around noon or so, but my other son wanted to go with us and he can only go at certain times.

We'll see the movie when all the hype dies down.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on December 27, 2010, 01:46:19 PM

Rosemary, your membership movie theater in Aberdeen sounds wonderful.  I'm surprised they don't have something like that here in the Southern California/Los Angeles area.  I'll have to check and see.

There is a theater not too far from me that shows films that don't appeal to a wide bunch of people, and I go there sometimes.  A while back they were showing all the films directed by John Cassavetes that I liked -- The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, A Woman Under the Influence, etc.  Loved to see his wife Gena Rowlands in his films.  Each time I went (during the daytime) I was the only one there.  Great!
 
Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on December 27, 2010, 03:26:39 PM
Marj: I'd forgotten that you're in the LA area. I'm in Torrance. Not much of movie interest here -- just standard theaters.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on December 27, 2010, 03:43:40 PM
Yes Marj, I too love it when I am the only person there!

Just been watching "the 100 greatest musicals" on TV - part one today and the remaining 50 tomorrow.  I am supposed to be turning out all my cupboards prior to moving house, so it was great to have this on at the same time.  There were some wonderful old films - the old musicals were just so lavish, with their amazing dance sequences, huge sets - and quite a bit of synchronised swimming!

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 27, 2010, 05:33:00 PM
My sister-in-law lives in Torrance - they go to movies nearly every week.  And they often go to see "small" movies.  I'll have to ask to see which movie houses they frequent.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 27, 2010, 08:48:10 PM
JoanK and Marj, I wrote my SIL, and this was her reply (re movies in the Torrance area)

We most often go to the AMC and Regal theaters since they are closest to us.  Some times we go to the Pacific theater in Manhattan Beach.   The Laemle chain is the one that has most of the Independent movies, but are so far away that we almost never go.  The chains are starting to show more of the Indies.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 28, 2010, 08:17:11 AM
ROSEMARY, sounds lovely.  I especially like the cafe/bookshop across
the street.
  MARJ, I agree about the widescreen gorgeous scenery, but the music
would be lost on me. I did watch the musical version of "A Christmas
Carol" and was able to enjoy the dancing even without the music. All
the solos were a complete loss, tho'.  I'm surprised that the theatre
remains open during hours when only one or two customers show up. It
must be a significant monetary loss.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on December 28, 2010, 02:41:08 PM
Babi said " I'm surprised that the theatre
remains open during hours when only one or two customers show up. It
must be a significant monetary loss."

They have several theaters under the one roof, not just the one I went to where I was the only one there.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 29, 2010, 08:41:56 AM
 Ah, hopefully the other theaters had enough patrons to make the difference.
Patronage is so important. I've known a number of small cafes that served
really good food, but they didn't get enough regular customers to stay open.
I think in smaller communities like mine people tend to eat out less often. Just
an impression; I could be wrong.  I notice there is only one multi-theater unit
in our area, too.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on December 29, 2010, 01:11:39 PM
Rosemary, great picture!  It’s good to “see” you here.  Interesting to hear about the theatre clubs  --it sounds like some theaters are doing creative marketing.  I seldom go to a theatre because I miss too much of the audio and the two theatre complexes in my town rarely show foreign films which would have subtitles.  But when I have been, I’ve wondered how families could afford to attend very often, especially when you consider the cost of concessions as well. (We smuggled our water bottles and nibbles into the Stieg Larsson film.)

Marjifay, do let us know when you get to see True Grit.  I’m part of that very small minority that never saw the first one, with John Wayne, so am looking forward to your thoughts on which is the better.  The few reviews I’ve seen seem to favor the new one.

Stomach flu forced me to cancel my Christmas visit to my West Coast families, so my New York daughter came to me instead of visiting friends in Nag’s Head.  A quiet, but pleasant Christmas.  She was nursing a cold and I was recouping, so we played board games and watched DVDs from Netflix.

I’d had Winter’s Bone for a few weeks, but wasn’t sure I wanted to see it – just not in the mood for what I perceived to be dysfunctional down-and-outers.  What a surprise!  Jennifer Lawrence does a wonderful job as the 17-year-old Ree Dolly, searching for her dead or alive father, much to the consternation of her meth-producing neighbors and relatives.  Almost a one woman show.  I’m so glad I saw it.  The author of the book, Daniel Woodrell, lives in West Plains, MO, in the Missouri Ozarks.  Supposedly, Missouri is the meth capital of the U.S.  I  don’t know, but a law was passed here recently requiring a doctor’s prescription to buy Sudefed or Muscinex, that type of cold medicine, to make meth ingredients harder to come by.

The other film we watched was You Can Count on Me, with Laura Linney and Mark Ruffalo which was okay, but not as good as Winter’s Bone.  One might think they were both films with strong, determined sisters caring for their families, but I don’t thing strong is the right word for the Laura Linney film.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on December 29, 2010, 03:25:43 PM
Oh dear Pedln, I hope you feel better soon too - it seems like there hasn't been a family untouched by illness of some sort this holiday.  My daughter is getting better but still has a terrible throat and cough.  It does however sound like a very cosy Christmas, playing board games and watching DVDs with your daughter.

I have to say that (whisper it low) I would be most upset if they made Benylin a prescription only medicine here, as it is what I take if I am unable to sleep - I probably only take it about once every few months, and I only take the dose as on the bottle, but it does do the trick when all else fails.  We already get an interrogation from the pharmacist when we buy it.  We can buy very mild sleeping pills from the pharmacy, but I find they leave me feeling wiped out the next day, which Benylin doesn't.  I have tried all the "natural" remedies and only wish they did work, but all the oil burners, lavender sprays, rescue remedy, etc, do nothing for me.

I do so agree about the cost of going to the cinema - and just about everyone apart from skinflint me seems to buy the hotdogs, popcorn, drinks and sweets from the concessions.  Like you, I take in drinks for my children and sometimes a packet of sweets from the pound store.

Get well soon,

Best wishes,

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 29, 2010, 03:55:41 PM
When we go to the movie theater, we go in the late afternoon ($6.00 here), and never buy anything else.   We've never been movie snackers.  Some of my swimming group goes on Tuesday afternoon when drinks and popcorn are $1.00.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on December 29, 2010, 05:12:50 PM
I once asked if the concession stand would sell a Senior Citizen a "child's" combo - and they would!  It was just the right amount of popcorn, soft drink and a small bag of candy.   I didn't take the toy.  ;)

A friend who was with me said, "I would never have thought of doing that!"   I told her the worst thing that could happen is that they would say, "No".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on December 30, 2010, 03:40:46 AM
Movie theatre prices here are fairly reasonable - for senior citizens anyway - but for a family 2 adults and 2 children plus snacks and maybe parking fees etc it could get pricey. The classic snack for us is the chocolate covered icecream cone - almost de rigeur - but the younger folk favour the popcorn and make a such a mess spilling it everywhere.

We have an excellent theatre group who as well as mainstream films bring us international offerings from around the world - regular festivals of French, Italian, British, Asian films - they host talks, sometimes get one of the actors or director to give a short talk with question time etc. They also bring us seasons from Covent Garden, the Paris Ballet and the NY Met Opera all in HD - the price for these is almost double the regular ticket cost but still not out of the question.

We still have some of the old open air movie theatres which were popular in the days before the drive-in. The open air theatres screen only during the summer and are a popular spot to take a picnic to have on the lawns before the show with a glass or two of wine. Funny sometimes to hear a cork being popped during a tense moment later the film as someone opens another bottle of the bubby stuff. We're lucky that our climate allows these theatres to thrive as it rarely rains during the summer - there's nothing quite like sitting under the stars on a balmy evening watching a good movie and sipping on something cold. I love the simple life.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 30, 2010, 09:08:58 AM
 PEDLN, the 'old movie' channels are offering "True Grit" lately, probably
in response to the new film coming out.  You could probably find it easily
enough. The older version probably seems 'dated' to the current generation. The older generation might hold a different view.

  Meet another 'skinflint', ROSEMARY. I no longer go out to the movies, as I need the closed captioning, but I remember well the shocking mark-ups on the lobby goodies. I was perfectly willing to stick something in my purse for any hunger pangs.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on December 30, 2010, 11:58:35 AM
Gumtree, I like your idea of the simple life. :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on December 30, 2010, 03:56:32 PM
MARY: thank you for the Torrance movie info. Sounds like the same theaters I go to. Except I didn't know about the one in Manhattan Beach. That's nearby, and we often go to the beach there to watch the surfers. It is the home of beach volleyball as well -- Southern California at its Southern Californyist!

If you're ever out here, visiting your SIL, let me know. We can get together. There's a kind of neat cafe/used bookstore, where people go, drink coffee and read the books. Some artists hang out there as well. Or we can go watch the surfers.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ALF43 on December 30, 2010, 04:13:59 PM
My daughters and I went to see True Grit and I couldn't believe how packed the movie theatre was.  It was the day after Christmas.  I loved it, but I guess I am un-american as I never was a big John Wayne fan, but i dearly love Jeff Bridges and he excelled in this movie, IMO.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on December 30, 2010, 04:36:51 PM
JoanK - glad I "found" a new movie for you.  I'll check in the next time we're out there - no plans at this time.

We might go see True Grit next week - or the week after that.  Now we're getting into basketball season, and that keeps us busy.  ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on December 31, 2010, 08:32:45 AM
The early John Wayne was definitely an American icon. I must admit that as he grew older, he might have done better not to try to dash up hills as if he were still a young man. Nevertheless, he was such a favorite that people still wanted to see him.
  I'm looking forward to seeing Jeff Bridges in the role. He is a top-notch
actor.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on January 01, 2011, 09:03:16 AM
Alf, I never liked John Wayne, either!  Just never went for the big macho man full-of-himself type!  I have always felt Wayne was more the image of what every American male wished he were than what every American woman desired.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on January 01, 2011, 02:02:11 PM
Amen! Marypage. I prefer a man witha sense of humor, a la Paul Newman. Oh yeah, he looked better also - to my eyes........ ;).........jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: JoanK on January 01, 2011, 06:03:39 PM
AAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHH Paul Newman!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on January 02, 2011, 03:11:07 AM
And Aaaaaah.... George Clooney ditto.

R  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 02, 2011, 07:59:58 AM
 Okay, ladies, pull yourselves together.   8)  Unfortunately, all the gorgeous men we sighed
over are now as old as we are, or older.  :'(
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on January 02, 2011, 08:17:40 AM
Well gorgeous George has certainly aged well   ;D

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 02, 2011, 08:50:52 AM
 Granted. Can't argue with that, ROSEMARY.  Who else do you think has aged well? (general
question)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 02, 2011, 06:27:55 PM
Well, I took Jean's advice and watched a Paul Newman that just happened to be here from Netflix -- The Verdict.  A golden oldie and pretty much a one man show for Newman.

Gorgeous George is one year older than my son.  I don't consider that aging.

I guess that leaves Robert Redford and Clint Eastwood.  And then there's  Martin Sheen -- I really liked him in the West Wing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on January 02, 2011, 08:24:20 PM
I have had a crush on Ed Harris for a long time.  Followed closely by Tommy Lee Jones.   I just can't see what the fuss is about with George Clooney.  If he asks me out I will just refer him to RosemaryKaye. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on January 03, 2011, 12:17:23 AM
I'm with you Roshanarose on the Clooney thing and Robert Redford doesn't appeal either- it's had me puzzled for years as to why everyone raves...
  I like Ed Harris and Tommy Lee Jones  too - and Willem Dafoe- all great actors But I don't have a crush on them.

For that , there was Paul Newman ... sigh
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on January 03, 2011, 01:18:27 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)






Robert Wagner!! Has aged very well! Cary Grant aged very well. Newman, wagner, Grant, all gave us, in their movie roles, at least, a man with a sense of humor. That makes them attractive to me, besides how they look.  I guess Clooney has done that too, but, ironically, one of the rhings that has turned me off of GC, in real life - on talk shows and interviews- he makes a joke abt EVERYTHING, it makes me feel like he's hiding himself behind the humor. However, everyone who has worked with him has said he's very nice - that's attractive too!

Oh! Yeah! Clooney's father has aged well, also! ......yeah, george is a little too young to talk abt how he has "aged".    :)

Dick Van Dyck? Ozzie Davis?...........jean  
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on January 03, 2011, 09:01:35 AM
My crush is Richard Gere.  I will watch any movie he is in just for him. The grayer his hair gets the sexier he is...at least for me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 03, 2011, 11:31:59 AM
I loved the ones we no longer have:  Yul Brynner!  Charlton Heston!
jeriron, we shall have a duel over who gets Richard Gere!  I am still madly in love with Sean Connery, even though he hasn't aged well!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 03, 2011, 11:40:48 AM
Sam Waterston is still here.  He's a good guy.  Is he acting in anything or just doing commercials?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on January 03, 2011, 12:07:55 PM
Sam Waterston was still on the original Law & Order, but I think that's over now.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: salan on January 03, 2011, 12:09:28 PM
Oh, did anyone mention Tom Selleck??  Yumm!
Sally
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on January 03, 2011, 07:52:40 PM
I like Willem Dafoe too, Gum.  He was extraordinary in "The Last Temptation of Christ".  It is a movie that I shall never forget.  It was banned here for several years as it was considered "blasphemous", but you could borrow it in Indie video stores.  Dan Brown reinvented the theme in "The Da Vinci Code"and no one even blinked.  Times change.  

Ralph Fiennes - Sexy and can act too  :o

Some bad news today about another wonderful actor.  Pete Postlethwaite died on 2/1/11 of cancer.  A great loss to the acting world.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 03, 2011, 08:50:22 PM
I remember Pete P. from The Usual Suspects and The Shipping News. I see he was in Inception, too. Haven't seen it yet. He played some interesting characters.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 04, 2011, 01:11:57 PM
Just discovered that Anne Francis has passed away.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/04/arts/04francis.html
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 05, 2011, 09:35:19 AM
 I haven't heard of Anne Francis in so long I had supposed she was already gone.
  In reading the list of your taste in males, it is clear that opinion is still
divided between dark or blond, rugged or classic.  Naturally.  Actually, I
like Clooney better now that he is older and not quite so, er, sleek.
Needless to say, people who are too 'pretty' know it, and tend to take
advantage of it.  I approach with caution.  ::)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 05, 2011, 01:22:17 PM
Love Tom Selleck in his new series, "Blue Bloods".  Also, the one where is a Sheriff in a small N.E. town (why can't I remember names/titles like that?) Darn.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 05, 2011, 01:45:19 PM
Jesse Stone. Yes, I liked those. Too bad they didn't make a series based on that character. I don't watch Blue Bloods. Too many big city cops and CSI stories on already.

BTW, did you hear that the original Law and Order is ending? I haven't watched it in several years.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on January 05, 2011, 03:31:31 PM
I definitely prefer dark, craggy, and not too pretty or baby-faced.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on January 05, 2011, 04:31:46 PM
My forty yr old dgt fell in love w/ Sean Connery abt 10 yrs ago, I was surprised. .......Oh, Yes! Yul Brynner, so exotic, so unique, so sexy! I think he was my all-time favorite sexy guy.......altho Tom Selleck got my attention right away as the Salem man.........blondes, other than Paul Newman never impressed me....maybe they looked too slick.... ;D........jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 05, 2011, 07:48:29 PM
In my early, early teenage years, I fell in love with Troy DOnohue and Tab Hunter!  Grew out of blondes fairly soon after!

Yul Brynner, you got it right, exotic.  Et cetera, et cetera!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on January 05, 2011, 08:46:27 PM
Buzz Lightyear is a hero in my eyes.  That jaw!  That chest!  That immortality!  That disposability!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on January 05, 2011, 09:07:30 PM
My fav was, is, and always will be Leslie Howard.  Paul Newman comes in second.  Howard was dead when I married The Love Of My Life, but I told Bob right up front that if Newman ever crooked his little finger and beckoned to me, I was gone!

Bob allowed as how he would take his chances, and so we were wed and lived happily ever after.  Never even encountered Paul Newman.  Sigh!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on January 06, 2011, 03:11:49 AM
Oh yes, Roshanarose!  Disposability - such an asset  :) - and much more fun than Woody - also dimmer, so easier to manage  :D

I always thought Nigel in the Archers would be a good bet - rich, nice and worshipped the ground that the dreadful Elizabeth walked on - but the wretched writer has just killed him off, purely, IMO, to get good 60th anniversary ratings.  Do any of you get The Archers?

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on January 06, 2011, 06:18:25 AM
Hi Rosemarykaye - I hope that you are well and that the ice and snow are not inhibiting you too much.

I have never heard of "The Archers".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on January 06, 2011, 05:52:22 PM
Oh my goodness, Roshanarose!  The Archers is a serial that has been on BBC Radio 4 every day except Saturdays since  before I was born.  It centres on the Archer family, who are farmers in the fictional village of Ambridge in "Borsetshire".  There is a huge cast of other characters.  The series was originally conceived to pass agricultural information on to farmers after the war ("an everyday story of country folk") - last week, on the 60th anniversary, there was a whole day of particularly iconic episodes on BBC7, together with interviews with some of the longest standing members of the cast, and it was interesting to note how much less didactic the programmes have become.  Some of the old episodes are famous - most especially the one in which Grace Died - Grace was the new and lovely young wife of Phil Archer, and she died going back into a burning stables to rescue her horses (who escaped).  It is widely believed that this episode was written to coincide with the first night of ITV (the first UK commercial TV station) in the 1950s.

The Archers has a huge following, several fan clubs, a section on the BBC website, etc etc.  One of my earliest memories is of sitting in the Belfast sink in our old kitchen listening to the theme tune - tum tee tum tee tum tee tum - whilst being bathed by my mother;  I must have been about 2.  The evening episode still starts at 7pm, with a repeat at 2pm the next day, and a weekly omnibus on Sunday mornings - these days of course you can also catch up via the website.

And yes, to change the subject, our weather is dire - no snow at the moment, tg, but sheet ice everywhere, roads and pavements lethal.  Thankfully i do not have to go anywhere apart from John Lewis's tomorrow - no driving for me.

Best wishes

Rosemary

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on January 06, 2011, 10:07:13 PM
Mmmmm>  I wonder how I missed out on hearing about "The Archers".  My early memories of radio include listening to the eternal "Blue Hills" (which was Australian) and the "American Hit Parade" and there was also "Portia Faces Life" and "Dossier on Demetrius".  I remember also being intrigued by Oral Roberts.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on January 07, 2011, 03:16:31 AM
Roshanarose I just picked this us from google but lost the reference

ABC Radio is credited with the longest-running daily serial, Blue Hills, written by Gwen Meredith. Blue Hills began in 1948, taking over from The Lawsons (1944-48), a serial by the same author. Blue Hills contained some of the most successful characters from The Lawsons and ran until 1976. In all, 5795 episodes of Blue Hills were produced.

I wonder if anyone actually heard all 5795 episodes.

Rosemary I'm sure the Archers were played on our radio - probably not all but some.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 07, 2011, 07:30:56 AM
Saw the new Coen Bros. TRUE GRIT film with Jeff Bridges last night in the theater.  We all came away with the same feeling:  We preferred the John Wayne film (and I am not a John Wayne fan).  While the acting was good in the new version, we did not think it was better than the older film.  And we all had a very difficult time understanding the garbled slurred language spoken by Jeff Bridges as "Rooster" Cogburn.  I would not recommend the Coen Bros. film.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 07, 2011, 09:50:02 AM
Quote
Buzz Lightyear is a hero in my eyes.  That jaw!  That chest!  That immortality!  That disposability!
ROSHANAROSE!  LOL!!

 Sorry to hear that critique on the new 'True Grit', MARJ.  I've been looking forward to seeing it.  Actually, tho', since I rely on closed captioning anyway, the slurring shouldn't bother me at all.  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 07, 2011, 10:17:39 AM
Yes, Babi, subtitles would have been very helpful for the new True Grit. And the movie seemed a bit slow until about half way thru, when it picked up.  Because of that and the problem understanding what they were saying, I'd have walked out if I had been there by myself.  I'll be interested in what you and others have to say about it.  It has gotten great reviews at IMDB, but I wonder if a lot of those were by younger people who never saw the John Wayne version.

 (I had not been to a theater to see a movie in a long time.  Couldn't believe the matinee prices -- $8.50.  I was expecting $4.50 or $5.00.  Surprise, surprise.  I think it's about $10 or more for an evening show.  Back to Netflix, LOL)

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 07, 2011, 11:08:26 AM
Marjifay, thanks for the True Grit critique.  I’ve seen neither version, and have about 200 titles  on my Netflix queue that I’d watch before viewing them.  So guess it'll be a while.

I understand what you’re saying about theater prices, but I seldom go because I need the subtitles or captions.  But I love to wander through BestBuy and think how neat it would be to have one of those big big screens on the free wall in my dining room and make it a dining/media room.  I’ve already downsized to a smaller table.   :D

Have y ou all been watching the stuff coming out of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas?  My brother used to go every year just to look and also meet his sons there, but is skipping it this year.  It looks like tablets are ruling the day, and some neat things are happening with TV also.  It sure looks like everything is going at WARP speed.  How does one keep up?

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 07, 2011, 11:33:48 AM
I saw somewhere, might have even been here, that the author prefers this new True Grit movie because it is closer to the book. If I recall, he wasn't fond of John Wayne. The new movie sounds more, shall we say, nasty?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 07, 2011, 12:08:54 PM
Pedln said, "Have you all been watching the stuff coming out of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas?  My brother used to go every year just to look and also meet his sons there, but is skipping it this year.  It looks like tablets are ruling the day, and some neat things are happening with TV also.  It sure looks like everything is going at WARP speed.  How does one keep up?"

I don't keep up.  I have enough trouble figuring out how to use my telephone's recorded messages thingamagig, and it's just an ordinary cordless line phone.  I admire people who can figure that stuff out.  Thank goodness my son is a genius when it comes to computers.  I got a 6% score on a mechanical aptitude test when I was young, and I don't think I've changed much.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on January 07, 2011, 02:48:43 PM
Oh yes Marj - I have just had the usual cooking experience of not being able to match the right sized lids to my saucepans - and I've had them at least 10 years  :(

That is how techincal I am.

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on January 07, 2011, 02:54:59 PM
Marj - I forgot to say - I was supposed to be taking Madeleine to the cinema this afternoon to see the new Narnia film - The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.  When I looked up the times they had taken off the "normal" ie 2D version, and left us with only the 3D edition - the price for the two of us to go mid-afternoon would have been over £15  (it was not being shown by our local independent, so this was one of the chain cinemas).

Madeleine, being my third and a very reasonable child, said we should not spend that amount of  money but should instead wait for the library to get the DVD - so we went to the library instead and borrowed the DVD of Ballet Shoes (BBC 2008 production, Emma Watson, Victoria Wood) plus some books.

I don't know how people face taking their entire families to peak time showings (the afternoon is supposed to be the cheap time).

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 07, 2011, 03:40:09 PM
Awfully expensive, Rosemary.  You have a very sensible daughter.  I guess families do what you did and borrow the movie from the library.  (Usually beats having people sitting behind you and having to listen to them crunch popcorn and talk.)  I guess that when it's a movie we feel we must see on the big screen, we should wait until we hear reviews from persons or media that we trust.  Altho' that doesn't always work, as I found out with True Grit.

Marj

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on January 08, 2011, 02:00:35 PM
Marj - i remember saying before getting our first cd player that was only going to get it if they promised me that nothing newer was coming out in the next two yrs!!! Now i'd have to say inthe next six months!....whew! Things are just flying by..........jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 08, 2011, 10:47:53 PM
I told my 14-year-old grandson I didn’t know what all the different I-things were – touch, phone, pod, etc. so he tried to sort it all out for me.

Quote
There are several types of I-Pods

I-Pod Classic is the oldest one with lots of storage
I-Pod Nano is smaller than the Classic, but with less storage
I-Pod Shuffle is the smallest I-Pod, without a screen, it just shuffles through your songs
I-Pod Touch is the newest I-Pod, with a touch screen, internet (via Wi-Fi), camera, and gaming
I-Phone is an I-Pod Touch, with a phone built in, and has the option of 3G, which is internet through cell towers

A Smart Phone is essentially a phone with internet, for the most part

Now one would think, with all these wonderful things coming out daily, that someone would have an on-the-shelf, buy-it-now DVR player/recorder that individuals could own, NOT RENT, and record what they wanted to watch without paying megabucks to cable and satellite companies.  Something with a hard-drive recorder so you’re not having to mess with tapes and discs.

My favorite so far from the Electronics Show is the Baby Monitor.  You can actually see baby, from another room, across town or wherever, and if baby starts to cry while you're at work you can actually sing to him via your cell phone.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on January 09, 2011, 04:28:02 AM
pedln - I liked the baby monitor, but for me it is a little late.  I used to watch my baby daughter like a hawk.  I was always relieved when she woke up.  I realise now that whilst she was asleep, she was in some kind of suspended animation.

Thanks to the 14 y o grandson for his knowledge of "i".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on January 09, 2011, 01:14:39 PM
What a concise, good summary of the "I's" Pedln, thank your g-son for sharing his expertise....jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on January 09, 2011, 07:03:41 PM
Thanks, Pedln. I agree that your grandson provided very helpful definitions.

A reminder that tonight many PBS stations will broadcast the first episode of Downton Abbey, a new series in the genre of "Upstairs, Downstairs." Join our PBS Classic discussion (http://seniorlearn.org/forum/index.php?topic=2012.0). Read more at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/downtonabbey/index.html
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on January 11, 2011, 09:41:55 PM
A movie I have to recommend is THE STATION AGENT (2003), available at Netflix.  Really great.  When I read the IMDB summary, had I not gotten a recommendation from a friend whose film recommendations I take seriously, I'd probably not have watched it.  So glad I did.  Never heard of the actors (Peter Dinklage, Patricia Clarkson, Bobby Cannavale), but I'm going to look for more of their films. 

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on January 11, 2011, 10:28:54 PM
I second your recommendation, Marj. A very nice, feel good movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 12, 2011, 09:01:14 AM
   I would like a nice, 'feel good' movie.  Thank you both for the
recommendation.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 12, 2011, 10:26:42 AM
Oh yes, The Station Agent is a wonderful movie.  I don't give many Five Stars, but that one got it.  I'm like you, Marj, the description didn't sell the title to me.  But I'm sure glad I saw it. It's truly a winner.

Here's the Netflix blurb --

Quote
When his only friend dies, a young dwarf named Finbar McBride (Peter Dinklage) relocates to an abandoned train station in rural New Jersey, intent on living the life of a hermit. But his solitude is interrupted by his colorful neighbors. Finbar's new crop of friends includes a struggling artist (Patricia Clarkson) coping with the recent death of her young son and a talkative Cuban hot dog vendor (Bobby Cannavale).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 12, 2011, 10:32:51 AM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)



Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 12, 2011, 10:34:38 AM
And Downton Abbey was /is great.  I hadn't planned to watch it, thinking it "just another period piece," but that isn't the case.  I've never seen Upstairs/Downstairs, so can't compare, but the relationships shown  here are fascinating.  As is the whole realm of who inherits, class, etc.  I must set the recorder for the next three weeks.

Just found this link this morning.  If you've seen Part 1 there are no spoilers.  If you haven't, you might want to wait.

Downton Abbey DVD Review (http://www.dvdverdict.com/reviews/downtonabbey.php)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on January 12, 2011, 04:28:06 PM
I absolutely adored Downton Abbey and cannot wait to see the rest of this series of episodes and to buy the DVD and see it again and again!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 12, 2011, 04:33:34 PM
Having the good fortune to have a DVR, I am presently watching Part I of Downton Abbey.  Even the first 30 minutes of it is wonderful!  I do have the Closed Captioned turned on, until I can get used to the rapidity of their speech, I will need it.  Been awhile since I watched something with the various English accents.  I understand the upper classes speech really well, but the maids/cooks get a bit "cockney" for my ear!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 13, 2011, 08:49:05 AM
 After locating "The Station Agent" on Netflix and reading the 'blurb', I realized I have seen that
movie.  It was very good,  to my pleasant surprise, as initially I didn't think I was going to like it.
I had simply forgotten the title.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on January 15, 2011, 12:25:31 PM
I always use the closed captioning or the subtitles, whichever is available, and if both are I opt for the subtitles, both because I am getting quite deaf and because the accents can be difficult to follow.  So happy you love the show as much as I.  It was a smash hit in Great Britain, and I have read they are in the process of making a follow up series.  Hurrah!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on January 16, 2011, 05:43:44 PM
I went to see The King's Speech with one of my daughters this afternoon, and it was SO good I plan to purchase the book!  We were truly wowed!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 23, 2011, 12:24:05 PM
Oh my gosh, MaryPage.  I didn't know the King's Speech was from a book.  Did you get it yet?


This was asked over in the library ---

Quote
Wasn't it great when they made movies of popular books? Do they do that as often now? I know there is a discussion category of "books into movies." Maybe someone who goes to the movies more than i do can give an objective answer?

and this was my response  --

I think they do, Jean, but sometimes they have other titles, sometimes the books aren’t so well-known.  And there are sometimes films from the blockbuster books like the Stieg Larsson trilogy.  Remember when Schindler’s List was such a hit?  Most of us were unaware of the book with the same title by Australian writer Thomas Keneally.  And then there is Brokeback Mountain, from a short story by (I think) Alice Munro.  I’ve seen the film African Queen gazillion times, but have never read the C.S. Forester book.  A fantastic recent film, and one I hope gets Jennifer Lawrence an Oscar, is Winter’s Bone from the book by Daniel Woodrell.

I could go on forever, because chasing down a film’s origin is a fun game for me.  Just today, an interviewee in the NY Times said he had seen Mao’s Last Dancer and it was magnificent.  It’s from the 2004 autobiography  by Li Cunxin.

Bookmarks Magazine sometimes lists films being made into books and whe they’re being released.  I’m waiting for Kathleen Stockett’s The Help, which is supposedly in production.

Have you found any good films from books recently? 



Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on January 23, 2011, 01:28:39 PM
It is my understanding, strictly from what I have read, that the book came after the movie.  The story began as a play.  The writers had the story directly from the speech therapist's fulsome and detailed notes of the sessions and his lifelong (thereafter) friendship with the king.  They wanted to tell it earlier, but some one, the Queen Mother herself?  Someone asked them on behalf of the royal family to wait until Queen Elizabeth, mother of the present Queen, was dead.  Apparently they (the royals) did not disagree with, or at least raised no objection to, the story itself.  Royals usually keep their distance from and make no public remarks concerning this type of thing, but "Buckingham Palace" has been known to protest through a spokesperson when something really gets up their nose(s).  In this case, the silence is almost an endorsement!

http://productsearch.barnesandnoble.com/search/results.aspx?store=BOOK&WRD=the+king's+speech&page=&prod=univ&choice=book&query=The+King's+Speech&flag=False&ugrp=1

No, the piles of books awaiting me are just too high at present for me to risk toppling them with an addition.  Later!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 24, 2011, 03:00:39 PM
Brokeback Mountain was from a short story by Annie Proulx. 

I saw The King's Speech on Saturday.  My word, was I ever wowed!
Performances by Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush was superb!!  Can't wait till it comes out on DVD, so I can PURCHASE it. Gotta have this one in my collection.  I sat there with tears in my eyes, and then there were the scenes where I laughed out loud.  What a movie!  Deserves Oscar for both men and best picture.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on January 25, 2011, 03:20:46 AM
I haven't been here for awhile. My 40+ y/o daughter saw the latest "True Grit" movie, and really liked it.  I love Jeff Bridges, but have read enoough comments, to know that I don't care to see it.

When I was a young child. I liked John Wayne.  That changed, when I realized that he never served in the military during WWII. 

Yesterday I watched a new program on PBS, called "Ebert Productions".  If you remember Siskel and Ebert, this is the same Richard Ebert.  He and his wife are producing this show.  There are two young people, maybe 30 y/o, are the critics.  I didn't care much for them.  However, it is my impression that Richard Ebert choses the movies being reviewed. They also have a website called: Ebert Productions.org
Sheila
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on January 25, 2011, 03:24:56 AM
TOMEREADER, ohhhhhhhhhh, I so want to see "The King's Speech".  Unfortunately, I can no longer enjoy a movie in a theatre.  Sighhh  Theatres are too noisy, as I am a bit hard of hearing.
   So, until it is available on Netflix, I must wait.

Sheila
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 25, 2011, 08:34:50 AM
Sheila, have you tried the assistive listening devices available in the theaters?  They don't work for me anymore, but they used to be very very helpful, both for movie and for the stage.

I'm really looking forward to seeing the King's Speech when it comes out on DVD.  Interesting, MaryPage, about the release waiting until after the Queen Mum died.  I wonder how she would have felt about it.

I've seen two from Netflix this week -- The Kids are All Right -- it was okay, but I don't see how it got a Best Comedy from the Golden Globes.

The other was an Argentine mystery -- The Secret in Their Eyes.  Again, it was okay.  I think the film code in Argentina must be a bit more liberal than in the US.  Neither was a WOW.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 25, 2011, 09:26:39 AM
 What is "Winter's Bone" about, PEDLN?  I rarely hear about a new movie until it's
ready for Netflix.

SHEILA, I can remember my Dad saying that one reason he enjoyed Audie Murphy's
westerns, is because you could believe he could actually do the things in the film.
With Murphy's war record, it didn't matter at all that he wasn't the tall, husky hero
type.  John Wayne's war movies were very patriotic and served to keep up morale during
WWII. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on January 26, 2011, 02:47:59 AM
You are right, BABI, John Wayne was good for patriotism and morale.  So many of the leading, male stars were in the military service during WWII, though.  It seemed hypocritical of him, to STAR in movies about war, but remain a civilian.  Just my reasoning.  Sometimes, a bit wacky.

Yes, PEDLIN, I used the assisted listening devices for several years at the theaters.  However, they haven't worked well for me, for the past couple of years.  Also, the competition from people talking with each other, became too distracting.  I wonder if the ushers, of the 1930s and 40s would help?

Sheila
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on January 26, 2011, 02:52:27 AM
P.S.  In addition, I now am in a lot of pain, from my old back injury.  Walking is a real challange.  I wake up in pain.  It takes an hour, or more, for it to lessen enough for me to walk into my kitchen to make breakfast.  So, unless I could find a parking place, in the middle of the day, close enough for me to walk from the car, into the movie, I would end up stuck in the parking lot. 

Sheila
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 26, 2011, 08:30:53 AM
 I'm so sorry to hear your back is causing you so much pain, SHEILA.  Have you tried using one
of those long support pillows at night.  My daughter uses one and loves it.  It does provide good
support for the back. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on January 26, 2011, 09:05:41 AM
Sheila I don't think it's wacky thinking about Jon Wayne.  To me he was a fake patriot.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 26, 2011, 12:07:58 PM
Sheila,I understand your problem.  No fun.  But thank goodness for Netflix.


Babi, re Winter's Bone:  It's about a 17-year-old girl who is responsible for not only her mentally ill mother, but a younger brother and sister as well, and is set in the rural Ozarks of Missouri, a very economically depressed area.  The meth-making father of the family has a court date coming up and if he does not appear the family home will be gone.  He has disappeared, and Ree, the daughter is treading where she should not, in order to find him.

Check the Netflix reviews.  They are not spoilers and may give you more of an idea what the film is about.

It's not just in the Ozarks where meth is made.  An apartment here in town caught fire because someone was cooking what he shouldn't.  Our city council passed a law requiring a doctor's prescription for previously over-the-counter cold medicine.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on January 26, 2011, 03:17:44 PM
I saw Winter's Bone, and I guess they were good performances, but (to me) the movie was so dark and depressing that I would never recommend it to anybody.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 27, 2011, 08:38:20 AM
 JERIRON, I don't think John Wayne could be called a fake patriot. He was a conservative in politics, and presented his views on integrity and his pride in America in many films. Actually, I think he did more for the war effort as a civilian and an actor than he could possibly have as an individual soldier.

 Thanks for the summary on "Winter's Bone", PEDLN.  Having just read a tragic tale of a 16-yr old girl (Little Bee), I think I'll postpone considering this one.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on January 27, 2011, 10:37:23 AM

Was it in here that someone mentioned Gloomy Sunday????If so,
MANY thanks!  It was available at my library both as a book and a
DVD, so I opted for the DVD, and must say it is one of the very best
movies I have ever seen----set in Hungary when Germany was seizing all Jews there,so you have some WW11, Budapest scenes,
lovely piano pieces, and a LOVE story. Whoever mentioned it, I THANK you.
JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on January 27, 2011, 10:45:56 AM
Jeriron, I'm not familiar with Gloomy Sunday, but am still tense from finishing the book A Trace of Smoke, set in Berlin in 1931.  Difficult times for everyone in the area.

This is from my local newspaper this morning.  It may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but the people in the southwestern quadrant of Missouri are thrilled with the praises Winter’s Bone is receiving, not to mention it’s four Oscar nominations.  It almost sounds like a family affair, so many locals were in involved in its production.  For some it was just a hobby, for others, a boost in their professional careers.

Quote
Area musicians such as Sisco have reaped rewards. Since appearing in the film, Sisco said her life has completely changed. She went from retired, teaching an occasional class at community college, to producing a successful soundtrack for the film and traveling for it, too. She was at Sundance when the film took top honors and recently returned from a film festival in Italy. "I'm so proud to have been a part of this and so proud to be an Ozarks hillbilly. People love us all over the world," she said.

Anyway, the article is kind of like a warm fuzzy.

Filmed in Forsythe (http://www.semissourian.com/story/1698345.html)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on January 27, 2011, 08:55:44 PM
Thanks to those of you who recommended THE STATION AGENT. I borrowed it from our library. I thought it was wonderful! The acting by the three main characters was fantastic and the story is so imaginative.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on January 27, 2011, 08:59:25 PM
Thanks, Pedln, for the link to that interesting article. I want to see that film and especially listen to the soundtrack.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on January 27, 2011, 10:21:10 PM
Winter's Bone - What a totally depressing movie!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on January 27, 2011, 11:03:41 PM
I agree, Tomereader.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: serenesheila on January 30, 2011, 06:28:23 PM
Thanks for the feedback, about my back pain.  Yes, BABI, I do sleep with a body pillow.  Without it, I do not think I would be able to even get out of bed!  I have a doctor's appointment on the 12th and plan to have a long talk with her.

Thank God, for books, this discussion group, and movies.  All of you are my social support group.

Sheila
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on January 31, 2011, 08:22:34 AM
 Let us know what your doctor says, SHEILA.  It may be helpful to some others of us with morning backaches.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 01, 2011, 02:48:44 PM
Upset and discouraged today because I read an article in W magazine (nothing at all to do with G.W.B., for those not in the know) complete with photo of the Hollywood version of Lisbeth Salander in the front that gives details of the filming of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo.  Not only does the Hollywood star not look as much like Lisbeth as the Swedish star, but -.-. they .-.- have .-.- changed -.-. the -,-, ending!  A lot!  Sob!

Had so looked forward, and now do not! NOT!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 01, 2011, 05:04:42 PM
Well, MaryPage, maybe that's how Hollywood wants to sell the film -- get everyone all hyped up about a different ending so they'll come to see what happens.  Having seen the Swedish version before reading the book, I was surprised to find that the film ending was not the ending of the book.  I enjoyed both the Tatoo and Fire films and the Tatoo book, but now cannot get excited about reading or viewing any more.  They were good stories, but now Stieg Larsson seems so 2010.

Has anyone seen this past weekend's No 1 Box-Office hit -- The Rite, with Anthony Hopkins?  I wonder if it was Hopkins, rather than the subject matter that was the draw.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on February 01, 2011, 07:52:32 PM
pedln, I won't be seeing The Rite.  Much as I love to watch Anthony Hopkins act, I don't do that type of movie.

We saw True Grit this afternoon and really liked it.  In the last month, I've watched the John Wayne version, read the book, and now seen the new movie.  Aand I must say, I enjoyed them all.  As we've talked about before, the scenery in the first one was SO not Arkansas/Oklahoma.  And this scenery is much more Ozarks.  I preferred Jeff Bridges in the Rooster Cogburn role, and liked the way Matt Damon did LeBoeuf.  Check them all out. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 02, 2011, 03:56:59 AM
Quote
They were good stories, but now Stieg Larsson seems so 2010.

Pedln - perfect - love it!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 02, 2011, 06:17:21 AM
So I wonder what "is 2011" then?  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 02, 2011, 09:13:42 AM
Alas, MARYPAGE, Hollywood has little respect for the writers'
original stories. They feel quite free to add or subtract whatever
they feel will sell more tickets.
  Ah, early days, ROSEMARY.  That remains to be seen, but I'm sure
those who produce the shoddier stuff will continue to do so. It did seem
to me that most of the top-ranking dramas of 2010 were heavy going.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 02, 2011, 09:20:35 AM
Quote
So I wonder what "is 2011" then? 


Natalie Portman?  Have you seen Black Swan?  I have not, but a friend emailed me that she thought it was weird.  But isn't Portman in another new film?

In the meantime, I'm flushing out an Amazon order with On Golden Pond, which should come soon.  And am just about finishing up Season One of the Waltons.

The other night I watched the  The Shop Around the Corner with Jimmy Stewart, from Netflix, set in Budapest in I-don't know what year.  A friend had said it was even better than You've Got Mail, its modern counterpart.  I agree -- 5 stars.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 02, 2011, 12:05:29 PM
One of my friends went with her 15 year old daughter to see Black Swan (it has a15 certificate here).  She was mortified by the lesbian sex scenes, etc and her daughter nearly died of emabrrassment.  She said, "what does a film have to have to get an 18 certificate?  cannibalism?"

I have this afternoon been to see "The King's Speech", it was lovely.  Colin Forth - what an actor!  What a man  ;D ;D

I used to love The Waltons when it was first on TV, would love to see the early ones again.

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 02, 2011, 12:28:08 PM
Pedln wrote, "The other night I watched the  The Shop Around the Corner with Jimmy Stewart, from Netflix, set in Budapest in I-don't know what year.  A friend had said it was even better than You've Got Mail, its modern counterpart.  I agree -- 5 stars."

I loved that 1940 Jimmy Stewart film.  Much better than You've Got Mail!

Marj
 
 
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 02, 2011, 02:24:21 PM
Marj - I couldn't bear You've Got Mail - but I think I was in a particularly cynical frame of mind when I saw it  :)  Sometimes I really enjoy improbably romances, but sometimes they just wind me up (just jealous really....)

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 02, 2011, 04:59:48 PM
Well, the family relationships in Mail were interesting.  Wasn't he close to being his "own grandpa."
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 02, 2011, 05:12:02 PM


(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)

I went to see The Shop Around The Corner with a little friend when I was ten.  Her mother took us.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 02, 2011, 06:23:06 PM
The movie reviews I read very carefully and thoroughly make it easy for me to decide whether or not to see a film.  I knew from the very first review that The Black Swan would only upset me.  I adore ballet, and am thrilled to have wound up with a niece who is a professional lead ballerina with the Stuttgart Ballet;  but I am in possession of extra tender sensibilities and knew I could not stomach The Black Swan.  Natalie Portman is a great actress and I applaud her for the work she put into it.  I have no doubt she deserves every award in the book;  but the movie would make me sick.  At 81, I just don't need that.  Long and short of it, though, I do not understand why everyone does not carefully check out the story line before going to see any movie!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 03, 2011, 08:11:29 AM
 Me, too, ROSEMARY. Some of those idyllic romances have me so
envious. I have to sigh, count my blessings, and call on my reserves
of sensible doubt.

 Congratulations on your prima ballerina, MARYPAGE. How lovely it
must be to see her dance. You are right about checking out movies
more carefully, of course. Too often if several people tell me a
movie was 'very good', I'm likely to order it without checking to
see exactly what it's about.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ALF43 on February 03, 2011, 09:08:28 AM
MaryPage- Weekly a few of us go to the movies and I was dying to see Black Swan.  My dear friend Isabelle who is a very busy, feisty, active 82 year old wanted to go with me.  I told her that the movie entailed a few scenes that she might shy away from.  After the movie, I mentioned to her that she had closed her eyes during a couple of the scenes and she said the same thing that you did:  "I just don't need that."   :o
I reminded her that she had been forewarned.

Yesterday I actually was thinking about Natalie Portman's depiction of this ballerina when I read this- I am paraphrasing here because my brain is mush:" It is not the art of the dance it is the passion of the dancer." 
I really liked that as you could see Portman's passion (in more ways than one, I might add.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 03, 2011, 11:10:17 AM
Having 8 children, I am firm in my conviction that we are each of us born with our basic personalities and are each different from the other, even in the same family.

I have one daughter who still, at age 56, gets nightmares if she has viewed a television program or seen a movie or read a book that has violence in it.  She has tried mightily to overcome this, but violence done to people quite simply does her in.  Most of us steel ourselves throughout our lives to not allow things to "get to us."  We tell ourselves that it is not real, or, if it is, that it is over, in the past, not our fault, happening far far away and there is nothing we can do.  This particular daughter seems to lack the gene to build a thick wall around her screaming-meemie reflex regarding pain or suffering.

Sometimes I think it might be better for mankind if we were all like this daughter!

I have never been to Stuttgart to see Elizabeth dance, but she has given me DVDs of her various performances.  I did see her dance when she was at school with the Bolshoi in Washington, D.C.  Elizabeth left home for good at age 12 to become a ballet dancer.  Imagine!  She loves it;  that is the thing.  Elizabeth is 27 now.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 03, 2011, 11:59:27 AM
One of my friends went with her 15 year old daughter to see Black Swan (it has a15 certificate here).  She was mortified by the lesbian sex scenes, etc and her daughter nearly died of emabrrassment.  She said, "what does a film have to have to get an 18 certificate?  cannibalism?"

I have this afternoon been to see "The King's Speech", it was lovely.  Colin Forth - what an actor!  What a man  ;D ;D

I used to love The Waltons when it was first on TV, would love to see the early ones again.

I posted here when I saw the "Black Swan" movie that it "wasn't a ballet movie to take your granddaughter to" (or daughter in your case) And that it had "sex, language, drugs and violence concerns. The film is rated "R" here in the states, and  
I would have thought that was suitable warning! 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 03, 2011, 02:47:45 PM
Tomereader - it certainly was, but it wasn't I who went to see it - it was one of my friends!  I hadn't seen this friend for some time till this week.  Now I've told several people to think twice - though i told my own elder daughter about my friend's experience, and she said, "no wonder Rose was embarrassed, it was because she was sitting next to her Mum" - ie she wouldn't have been otherwise!

By the way, have just realised there were quite a few typos in my last post - I do really know that it's Colin Firth - must have been overcome by the pleasure of seeing him  ;D

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 03, 2011, 03:24:54 PM
Rosemary, I have that same reaction to Colin Firth!!

I just meant my post for whoever might contemplate seeing the movie, not specifically for you, and I'm glad you passed the word.  It's a shame that folks don't do more research before going to a movie. Now, word of warning for you to pass on...The new Portman movie is so far out of her usual bailiwick (romantic? comedy with that cipher, Ashton Kutcher) "No Strings Attached" that I don't intend to see it.  A friend, who reviews movies locally, said it was totally (as the title implies) about sex with no committment, and discusses various sexual permutations, etc.  Sounds like no redeeming social value to me!!  Why Portman would give such a stunning, Oscar-worthy performance in Swan, and turn around and do a movie like this one, is beyond my ken.  Oh, well. There is not a lot of awesomeness in movies nowadays anyway, The King's Speech being the exception to that rule. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 03, 2011, 04:00:27 PM
Tomereader - thanks for the warning, it sounds dire.  I have just realised that I have for some reason been reading your screen name as Tombreader - I kept imagining you as some sort of graveyard haunting goth, and now I see it's just about big books!

Honestly, I should not be let out....

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on February 03, 2011, 07:39:22 PM
Rosemary It's Ok for you to be let out occasionally, just make sure it is nowhere near graveyards. ::)

I haven't been to see a movie for weeks.  An oversight which is due to what has been befalling my family, my city and my state.

Just off topic, but I can't resist it.  Rosemary have you ever had "haggis in batter"?  Evidently there is a shop in Edinburgh that serves this cultural treasure, and other such calorie laden treats.  Bourdain recommends it.  The shop is called "The Mermaid".  Bourdain and Ian Rankin also visited a restaurant of a "famous" chef, who both of the men respectfully called "Chef".  The "Chef's" last name was Kitchin.  No seriously!!  His establishment is also called "The Kitchin" and is somewhere near the water in Edinburgh.  Or was it just raining?  Anyway, Rosemary, I expect reviews of both of these salubrious, although somewhat different, eateries from you after you "settle".  I must say that Edinburgh looks like the type of place I woul like to visit.  Dark, dour, but fascinating, like the Scots themselves

As for Colin Firth - I am now going to have a cold shower.  No seriously, I am!!!  It is so humid here.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: ALF43 on February 03, 2011, 08:14:11 PM
Three weeks and three movies- The Kings Speech (my personal favorite), The Kids are Alright, (well done) and The Black Swan.  I suppose that those three will be the last GOOD movies I witness for a while. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 04, 2011, 03:19:13 AM
Roshanarose - you have just given me my first laugh of the day (it's only 8am here)  :D

No I have not had haggis in batter, but I have no doubt that it does exist.  I'm afraid the Scots diet means that just about anything in batter exists.  In Stonehaven (a coastal town near here) there is a chippy famous for its deep-fried Mars Bars, and I think last year they also did a deep-fried Easter egg  :-\

There are some very good cafes and restaurants on the waterside at Leith and Portobello in Edinburgh.  Leith is the old dock area, very run down, then huge building projects started in the boom times, most of these are half-finished, abandoned, blocks of flats - v depressing.  There is, however, a small waterfront area that is really nice - I love the cafes down there.  Portobello is Edinburgh's seaside.  I don't know it at all well, but I have read that it has some good eateries.  I will look up the Mermaid, and I think I have heard of that chef called Kitchin - will look that up as well.

Please do visit Edinburgh - I would love to see you.  It's not all dark and dour - though the Old Town very much is - but it is very Presbyterian in parts.  The New Town is very light and airy but still has that "dour" atmosphere that you mention.  I think we have at last bought our flat; it is in Stockbridge, just down the (unfortunately steep) hill from the New Town, and near to the park, the Botanic Gardens, and plenty of little shops.  I am trying to remember that these are all positives to stop me panicking about all the rest of it!!

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 04, 2011, 09:18:41 AM
Quote
I am trying to remember that these are all positives to stop me panicking about all the rest of it!!
ROSEMARY, I think that is fairly typical of moving.  There are always
compromises to be made, aren't there?  I've found (many moves in
my lifetime) that the problem areas quickly become normal routine.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 04, 2011, 12:39:07 PM
Speaking of "fried things"...when we have our State Fair of Texas, I think everyone with concessions tries to outdo the other for items that can be fried.  We have had fried candy bars, fried Coca-Cola, and so on.  There is even a restaurant locally that serves fried pickles.  (not just during the Fair)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on February 04, 2011, 01:07:35 PM
Fried pickles are pretty good - just VERY salty (at least the ones I've had).
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Frybabe on February 04, 2011, 01:51:38 PM
Quote
I must say that Edinburgh looks like the type of place I woul like to visit.

Roshanarose, Although it was many, many years ago (before the advent of fried Mars Bars, Rosemarykaye) I still remember the feeling I had when visiting Edinburgh. Not a I've been here before feeling, so much as I had come home - like I belonged there.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 04, 2011, 01:54:08 PM
Thanks Babi - I appreciate your support.  I know you are right - in a few months we will be in quite another routine.  At the moment I feel in a kind of limbo, wandering about thinking "I should be doing Something".  I remember when a friend down the road moved - she only moved about 4 doors along, but she found it very stressful.  I saw her a few days before moving day, and she said "I just keep buying bottles of g...." - I was waiting for the word "gin" - it turned out to be Jif (a cleaning product)  ;D

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on February 04, 2011, 02:38:16 PM
Rosemanry,  after I sold the family home and moved to this duplex, I felt as if I were "staying here" - not as if I lived here.  I said sternly to myself,  "Self!  You will wait for a year before you make another change."
Of course, long before the year was over, I felt very much at home and knew it was the best decision I could have ever made.

LOL at your misinterpreting what your friend was saying.  In the USA, Jif is a brand of peanut butter

We are still having low temperatures but no more snow.   I managed to get out and fill the bird feeders before the birds lined up on the window sill in protest.  I looked as if I was off to conquer Mount Everest - with a snow shovel!!  :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 04, 2011, 03:35:10 PM
Thanks Callie, I am sure you are right - and well done on feeding your birds.  I am often seen struggling out there with my packets of seed, suet, etc - I am usually wearing my dressing gown and wellington boots, as I feel so sorry for the poor things that I feel I should feed them as soon as I can.

Rosemary

PS What is a duplex?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on February 04, 2011, 04:22:33 PM
A duplex is two dwellings under a common roof - separated by a common wall (in my case,  a soundproof very secure fire wall). In my area, the two dwellings (units) have been built separately and don't necessarily have the same floor plan.

Do you call these "attached houses"?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on February 04, 2011, 10:00:51 PM
Rosemary - I am not going to talk about moving house except to say that giving birth is a doddle in comparison.

As I recall "The Kitchin" was in Leith.

My favourite battered treat, which I diligently avoid, is battered sushi.  You have no idea how good it is.

Happy Nesting Rosemary!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on February 04, 2011, 10:35:07 PM
I've discovered that Fried Green Beans are a nice substitute for French Fries as a side dish in restaurants.  My rationale is that the healthy green veggie counteracts the "fried".  ;)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marcie on February 04, 2011, 11:20:53 PM
Good thinking, Callie  :)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 05, 2011, 04:23:33 AM
Callie - we call them "semi-detached" (I think that maybe reflects our obsession with owning detached houses (ie separate ones) - they are seen as significantly upmarket.)  We live at the moment in a terraced house - ie a long row of houses all joined by common walls (except at the end of course!).

Gryff Rhys Jones wrote a very funny autobiography called "Semi-Detached", most of which was about his upbringing in "rural" suburbia - although it was indeed a lot more rural in those days.

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 05, 2011, 04:37:39 AM
We used to call them 'semi-detached' but nowadays the newer versions are called a 'duplex'.  We still have lots of the old semi-detached ones in the inner suburbs and some terrace houses too although they weren't  as numerous as were the semis. When I was a child it was considered perhaps 'lower-class' to live in a semi or a terrace as much of the areas where they were built had fallen into a period of neglect and disrepair with the buildings rented out. Nowadays they are both often seen as being upmarket especially when the new owners have spent a fortune making them habitable again.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 05, 2011, 09:06:57 AM
 Oh, come now! Fried coca-cola?  How does one fry a liquid??   ???
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 05, 2011, 09:56:52 AM
No idea, but Nigella Lawson has a recipe for coca cola cake that's quite good.

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 05, 2011, 11:40:08 AM
Can't wait to try -- Fried coca cola --  How????
And Fried Mars bars;  I'll pass on the sushi, though I don't doubt your assessment, Roshanarose   :D

But there's "fried" and then there's "fried,"  right?  Some fried is better than other fried?

Gently fried?  as opposed to "deeply fried?

And as long as it's a fruit or a vegetable, it's okay.  Even weight watchers is saying 0 points for fruits and vegetables.  I don't know about "fried" green beans, Callie, but I much prefer the "sauteed"  green beans to the "cook 'em with ham until they're dead" method which seems to be preferred in my neck of the woods.

Finally watched Russell Crowe in Master and Commander last night, after picking it out of Walmart's Discount Barrel eons ago.  Really enjoyed it, though I'd like to see it on a bigger screen. But I'm not so sure I want to get involved with all of Patrick O'Briens books.

Rosemary, Nigella Lawson has some good stuff, doesn't she. I'll have to track down her coca cola cake. It sounds so nice and moist and "plummy?"
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 05, 2011, 11:56:17 AM
I don't know how they did it, and as I think about it, it may have been fried Dr. Pepper not coke, but same thing.  It was the talk of the State Fair that year, and they even did a piece on TV news about how it was accomplished.  Of course, I don't remember that part.

I love fried green beans.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 05, 2011, 12:07:13 PM
I enjoyed theMaster and Commander film - apart from Russell Crowe, I also like Paul Bettany who played Maturin. He's superb in almost every part he plays - as is Crowe. I've only read a few of the Aubrey/Maturin series but one day I hope to find time to read the lot from beginning to end ...

I enjoy watching Nigella occasionally. They put her on sometimes before the 7pm news so I'm making dinner with an eye of her as well. I just love those super rich recipes she does but wouldn't dare to eat them as a regular thing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 05, 2011, 01:04:19 PM
Does anyone have the recipe for Nigella Lawson's Coca Cola Cake  -- lots of talk about how wonderful it is, but not the recipe.  I did find one that i copied, but it's all in grams and mililiters and I don't know how to translate.

Apparently this cake is also a Southern tradition, and I have found lots of places to go and eat it, but not the recipe itself.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on February 05, 2011, 01:25:02 PM
from "Southern Living" magazine:
Cola Cake

2 cups all purpose flour
2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon soda

1 cup cola-flavored beverage (Coca-Cola)
1 cup butter or margarine
2 Tablespoons cocoa (powdered)

1/2 cup buttermilk
2 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups miniature marshmallows

Combine flour, sugar and salt in a large mixing bowl; mix well and set aside.
Combine cola, butter and cocoa in a heavy saucepan; bring to a boil, stirring constantly.
Gradually stir into flour mixture.
Stir in buttermilk, eggs, vanilla and marshmallows.
Pour into a greased and floured 13x9x2 inch baking pan.
Bake at 350º for 30-35 minutes or until a wooden pick (toothpick?) inserted in center comes out clean.
Spread Cola Frosting over warm cake.
(Recipe for this in another post)



Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on February 05, 2011, 01:28:31 PM
Cola Frosting

1/2 cup butter or margarine
1/4 cup plus 2 Tablespoons Coke
2 Tablespoons cocoa
1 (16 oz) package powdered sugar, sifted
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Combine butter, Coke and cocoa in a heavy saucepan.; bring to a boil, stirring constantly.
Remove from heat; stir in sugar and vanilla.  Yield: enough for one sheet cake.

After spreading frosting on cake, sprinkle with 1 cup finely chopped pecans or walnuts


Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on February 05, 2011, 01:54:21 PM
P.S.  I found several similar recipes in a Beta Sigma Phi cookbook.  The only difference in ingredients was to use half butter/oleo and half Crisco.

Who mentioned Dr. Pepper?    I found a recipe for Dr. Pepper cake that's different from the Coke Cake.   Rather than take up space here, E-mail me if you're interested and I'll send it to you.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 05, 2011, 02:53:13 PM
Callie, I had a look at my Nigella Lawson book, and her recipe is broadly similar but there are no marshmallows and only one (large) egg.

She also suggests making Coca Cola cup cakes by putting the mixture into 12 muffin cases.  I think you would cook them for a slightly shorter time, though she doesn't say so.  You pour the icing on just after you take them out of the oven, then you can decorate them (if you wish) with those little Coca Cola bottle shaped gummy sweets.  yes I know it sounds yuk, but my children beg to differ  :)

The only other important thing to note is that it must not be Diet Coke!

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: CallieinOK on February 05, 2011, 04:18:22 PM
Rosemary,  I heartily agree about it not being Diet Coke.  I don't think some of the other "Cola" drinks would work as well, either - but I could be wrong about that.

I have another similar recipe (no Coke) which calls for the mini-marshmallows to be added with the frosting.   Back in the day when I made this cake often, I would sprinkle on the marshmallows and put the cake back in the oven (turned off) while I mixed the frosting.  The m-mallows became gooey enough to swirl through the frosting as it was spread on the cake.  Yum!

LOL at your children's opinion of the gummy sweets!  I'm sure my grandchildren would agree.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 05, 2011, 04:19:10 PM
I read every one of the, was it 23?, Patrick O'Brian books.  Wonderful stuff!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 05, 2011, 07:12:18 PM
Thank you, Callie.  NOt sure when I'm going to make, but I do have all the ingredients on hand except for the buttermilk, and I think you can substitute milk and lemon juice.  One of the sites that TALKED about it said that.  Anyway, it just sounds delicious.

MaryPage -- WOW, impressive.  That speaks well for Patrick O'Brien.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 05, 2011, 08:55:14 PM
I read every one of the, was it 23?, Patrick O'Brian books.  Wonderful stuff!
Me too, except for the unfinished fragment O'Brian left when he died.  Yes, wonderful stuff indeed.  The movie, named The Far Side of the World after the tenth book, doesn't take much from that book except the route of Aubrey's ship, but is a mish-mash of a number of the books.  Fair enough.  They worked hard at accuracy.  Aubrey's ship is the Rose, a 1970 reproduction of an 18th century frigate.  The interior of Acheron, the enemy ship, is computer generated from my favorite ship in the world, the USS Constitution  (Old Ironsides)  and the business of Acheron's hull reflects the fact that Constitution's hull was constructed of live oak, a particularly tough wood.   In spite of all their accuracy, including twisting the ropes of the ships the way it was done then rather than current practice, they couldn't trouble to check that Aubrey's wife Sophie was a blonde, and have him gazing at a miniature of a brunette.

Constitution appears in person in book 6, The Fortune of War, when she captures Java, with Aubrey on board (a historical battle).  Constitution was built in 1797, and is still a commissioned ship in the US navy, supposedly still capable of sailing, though mostly moored in Boston harbor.  If you like that sort of thing, you can tour her in Boston.

Never mind my hobby horse, even if you never heard of Aubrey or O'Brian, Master and Commander is a very good movie.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 06, 2011, 08:30:32 AM
Having learned about roasted vegetables, I gave it a try and I
must say roasted wins over boiled any day.  So simple: spray
lightly with one of the cooking oils, sprinkle with your favorite
herbs, and stick them into the oven until tender. Great for squash,
carrots...that kind of veg.
  Speaking of favorite Southern cakes,  are you familiar with the yummy
chocolate lovers dream, the Mississippi Mud Cake?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 06, 2011, 09:24:22 AM

(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)


I too loved the movie and agree it was a story taken from a number of the books.  There were things I enjoyed in the books that had to be left out, however;  so would have preferred more movies.  Especially enjoyed the life he lived with his wife and children when back in England.  He certainly was not home much, but when he was I found it interesting.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 08, 2011, 11:19:13 AM
I just watched a very good film from Netflix, IN BRUGES, a 2008 UK film with some great actors including Colin Farrell.  Funny, poignant, and suspenseful.

I just found that you can watch Netflix films with subtitles.  Wonderful!  I have a terrible time with British accents, and even some American films where they mumble.

Speaking of mumbling American films, there is a very funny parody of True Grit (I couldn't understand Jeff Bridges at all in that one), at YouTube, entitled "True Grit with Subtitles."

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 08, 2011, 11:41:00 AM
I bought the DVD of IN BRUGES because that is one of my favorite places on the planet.  The scenery was beautiful, but I hated the film itself.  Too much violence.  I loaned it to one daughter who has visited Bruges several times, and she agreed with me:  loved seeing the city, hated the plot.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on February 08, 2011, 05:21:45 PM
I checked Netflix and realized I had seen In Burges and gave it 4 stars.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 08, 2011, 06:27:59 PM
MaryPage, it's been a few years since I've seen In Bruges, but I felt much as you did.  Loved the scenery, but did not really care for the film itself.  Maybe on a different day I'd feel differently.  A lot depends on mood sometimes.

I saw Sideways when it first came out on DVD and didn't like it all, but so many people were raving about it, even my generation, that when it showed up in Walmart's bargain barrel I snapped it up, but haven't rewatched it yet.  The plan is that I will study it to see what everyone is raving about.

I did watch over the weekend the first part of a delightful mini-series -- Dance to the Music of Time -- from Anthony Powell's books -- thoroughly enjoyed it.  There are flashbacks, but this first disc  is set among the British upper-class a few years after WWI.  There are three more segments and I'm looking forward to them.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 08, 2011, 10:22:02 PM
Pedln, I'm so glad you are enjoying Dance to the Music of Time.  You don't say if you have read the twelve books on which it's based.  If you have, you know what a good job they are doing of accurately getting the spirit of the books.  If not, it doesn't matter, it's still a really good story.  The remaining discs are just as good.

I'm an Anthony Powell nut, and have read the twelve books more than once.  You could quibble about details, but I think they did a remarkable job both of boiling down the plot into something intelligible and of appropriate casting.  Have fun watching.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on February 08, 2011, 11:00:28 PM
Has anyone seen "Hereafter"?  I do adore Mark Damon.  He achieved adoration status because of his performance in "The Talented Mr Ripley".  I didn't want that movie to end.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 09, 2011, 02:19:57 AM
Oh yes Pedln and PatH - A Dance to the Music of Time is one of my very top favourites.  I have read all of the books, and also watched the series, and I loved them both.  Simon Russell Beale, who plays Widmerpool throughout, is a genius IMO - and seems such a nice man too whenever he is interviewed.  Lucky you Pedln, still 3 more DVDs to go and all of them wonderful.

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 09, 2011, 09:00:36 AM
  Your WalMart has a bargain barrel, PEDLN?  I've not seen anything
like that in mine. If fact, several months ago they moved so much
around in the store that I'm only now beginning to know my way
around again. I kept telling them they should at least put out a
floor plan for the new arrangements so we could find things, but
my very sensible suggestion was ignored.

  I haven't seen any of the films mentioned this morning. I need to find
out a bit more about them and see if I should add to our queue.  (That
list is longer than my tbr list.)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 09, 2011, 11:47:39 AM
I think some stores deliberately make it hard to get around and find things.  The idea is that if you go through a lot of departments you will make impulse purchases, but it doesn't work that way for me, it just makes me cross and tired.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 09, 2011, 01:07:16 PM
Just a couple comments on prev. posts:  "In Bruges" - beautiful scenery, but the violence and cursing totally turned me off.

"Hereafter" with Matt Damon, saw it and enjoyed it.  I think it's one that should be seen at least twice.

Got "The Talented Mr. Ripley" from Netflix.  It actually was my first time to see the movie from beginning to end.  I had seen parts of it, but I am kind of silly, if a movie is on, and is "in the middle" so to speak, I won't watch the rest of it.  So I had seen several of the middle parts.  Matt was wonderful in that, so much so that I just hated him!  (translates into great acting) 

Sideways - yes it was hyped hyped hyped.  But it didn't do a thing for me, and one viewing was plenty. 

I have never heard of "Dance to the Music of Time" but you all are making it sound so interesting, I may have to get it from Netflix (do they have it?)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on February 09, 2011, 01:45:20 PM
Well done, PatH, on comparing the movie to the O'Brien books as a mish-mash!  My opinion, too!   Not only have I read all his books more than once, but they remain at hand.   Some nights my late-evening reading is too ...  crime-solving-ish ... to get to sleep with, so P. O'Brien comes to hand again.
But despite all that, I enjoyed the movie Master and Commander!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 09, 2011, 02:36:59 PM
I own a boxed, 4 volume set of DVDs for A Dance to the Music of Time, and truth to tell, I don't remember a thing about it.  Will have to pull it down and watch it again, unless I have not watched it at all.  Thing is, it was on a shelf in my bookcase that holds all of my DVDs that is only for films I have already viewed.  Maybe I haven't?  Maybe I am suffering from short-term memory loss!  Bummer!  Will take a look at it soon.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: joyous on February 09, 2011, 02:43:33 PM

I consider In Bruges one of the worst movies I have ever seen. :-X
JOY
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 09, 2011, 03:08:15 PM
Quote
Your WalMart has a bargain barrel, PEDLN?

They did, Babi, just a big wire mesh thing piled three or four feet high with DVDs.  When it first caught my eye we had just been discussing the film The Emperor's Club, and there is was in the barrel and I didn't get it.  And of course the next time I couldn't find it -- just stood there digging like a squirrel looking for nuts in a snowstorm.  But I have picked up some others that way and now it's kind of a game -- what will I want to watch more than once, and how cheap will it be. My real bargain was a $4 number with Casablanca, Gigi, and two other films.  Amazon, too, sometimes has great markdowns and I usually keep some in my cart there, just in case. If they're in your cart and the price goes down, they let you know.  Likewise if they go up.  Right now I'm keeping an eye on The Bourne Trilogy, but it has to drop a little more for old tight wad here.

PatH, I haven't read any of the Anthony Powell or Patrick O'Brian books and may have to let those pass me by.  There's only so much time, right.

The Social Network
just came out on DVD and is no 1 in my netflix queue.  The note beside it says Very Long Wait -- I wonder how long.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 09, 2011, 03:28:18 PM
Pat said, "I think some stores deliberately make it hard to get around and find things.  The idea is that if you go through a lot of departments you will make impulse purchases, but it doesn't work that way for me, it just makes me cross and tired. "

I'm with you, Pat.  I'm not a "shopper," and when I do go to a store I know exactly what I want.  If I can't find it quickly, or find someone to help me, I leave.

Marge
 
 
 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 09, 2011, 05:54:05 PM
Yes Pat - the ones that drive me nuts are those that have one "up" escalator, then you have to walk round to the other end to get the up escalator to the next floor.  I'm sure they think you will pass things that you will then buy, whereas of course I just get cross and hot and more likely to walk out with nothing.

I recall my MIL telling me years ago that she could no longer be bothered with the queues in supermarkets and just got her groceries from the local (expensive) petrol station.  At  the time I thought she was mad - and needless to say I now think along very similar lines - it's all too much trouble !  Do you think we spend so many years running about like headless chickens when our children are little, that when they have grown up we just think "no more!  now it's time for me!"?

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 10, 2011, 08:40:10 AM
Amen, PATH. I do most of my grocery shopping at the smallest store
around. It may not have the variety of the bigger stores, but it
doesn't tire me out, either.

 
Quote
My real bargain was a $4 number with Casablanca, Gigi,and two other films.
  Oh, wow! That was a great find.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on February 10, 2011, 10:07:58 AM
Tomereader - Thanks for that info about "Hereafter".  I agree that one couln't help but hate Matt Damon in "The Talented Mr Ripley", but, oh! that killer smile and that coltish awkwardness (and those glasses!).  I can see how the other characters could have been fooled.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 11, 2011, 12:45:54 PM
A great day in History!  A great day for Egypt!  People dancing in the streets all over that country and many other nations of the Middle East.  Reminds me of V-J Day!

A reminder of what I hope will go down in the History books, though I feel doubtful:  this was all begun by a YOUNG WOMAN with college degrees.  She has generaled the whole peaceful protest.  Hope she gets the credit, but, men being what they are, I doubt it.  One can but hope!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 11, 2011, 10:38:54 PM
Did you notice all the children there -- waving flags, riding on shoulders, some in cars.  Even if the very little ones won't remember the day, their parents want them to know that they witnessed history being made.  So they can tell their children , "I was there when  .  .  . ..   ."
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on February 12, 2011, 08:19:55 AM
MaryPage - there was a comprehensive coverage on the International TV channel this evening about the change of the guard in Egypt.  The cynic in me tells me that the Egyptians have and long and rocky road to "Democracy" Western style.  No young woman was mentioned. 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 12, 2011, 04:20:08 PM
In every Friday Wall Street Journal Joe Morganstern has a column about current or upcoming films.  I don't always get to it, but did read todays, and was happy to pick up on this excerpt.


Quote
Several weeks before it opened, I had a conversation with Rupert Murdoch, who popped a question familiar to movie critics: What should he see?

I suggested "The King's Speech," and, not wanting to spoil it with too many details, gave a shorthand description: Colin Firth as King George VI, who has a terrible stutter, and Geoffrey Rush as a raffish Australian speech therapist.

Yes, he replied, Lionel Logue.

"So you know the story."

Not the story of the movie, he said. "Lionel Logue saved my father's life."

When I responded with speechlessness, he explained that his father, as a young man, wanted passionately to be a newspaper reporter, but couldn't interview people because he stuttered. Then he met Lionel Logue, who cured him in less than a year.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 13, 2011, 01:42:08 AM
In his early days Lionel Logue taught elocution at a private school here in Perth, West. Aust. Needless to say, after his first address to the school assembly his classes were mobbed by eager students wanting to take his classes.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on February 14, 2011, 03:02:21 PM
Re:large vs small grocery stores, for 30 yrs  Acme had a nice moderately sized store in the downtown section of our town. On my way home from work, i cld stop, park next to the store, run in and get something for supper, and, if i didn't run into and chat w/an acquaintance, i cld be out in 10-15 mins. About 10 yrs ago they opened a huuuge store outside of town, near a new Wegman's, and in a few yrs, closed "the little Acme" as everyone called it. Now there is no grocery store that can be easily walked to, or close to several small senior housing areas in town. So, the drug stores have begun to sell non-perishables, both of them are on Main Street and can be walked to. Three weeks ago Acme closed the " big" store on the edge of town!!! Anybody who was willing to fight the crowds and the loooong aisles, were going to Wegman's, which had better prices on regular products and all the exotic products you want..........since i was an Acme customer and i'm not a fan of those features of Wegman's, i've got to find a new store. So much for customer service, or chatting to tour customer's abt what they want. Nobody i knew wanted to see the "little Acme" closed.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 14, 2011, 04:11:48 PM
Isn't that the way of things, though.  Sigh!  I feel your frustration.

Here in Annapolis, I have no complaints;  but picturesque and beautiful though it is, I would not live in one of the million dollar plus homes in our Historic District for anything.  Yes, I would adore to live in one of those wonderful old houses, and yes I would love to be able to walk down to City Dock or the restaurants or little shoppes.  But there is no grocery store whatsoever, not a mini convenience or 7/11 or you-name-it for miles and miles.  You simply have to drive, and what is more, there is NO parking to be had anywhere downtown.  Even a homeowner, except for the very rare driveway, has no quarantee of a space in front of their own (did I mention multi-million dollar?) home!  It takes a special kind of person, and I am not one of those.  But then again, I would not qualify for one financially.  Sigh!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 14, 2011, 05:57:26 PM
Jean - the same thing is happening here.  First all the big supermarket chains - Tesco, Sainsbury's, Asda, - all opened huge superstores to which you need to drive; now, they have all started buying up shops in the city centre and making them into "Tesco Metro", etc - ie the replacements for the corner shops they put out of business in the first place.  Whilst it's handy having them locally, they do not have the personal service that the old corner shops had - they don't know their customers, and would never respond to a particular customer's request for a certain product - it's all distributed from a centralised depot.  What's more, they charge more for the same item in one of these shops than they do in their out of town stores; I am fine with small independent shops charging more, but why should Sainsbury's need to do so?

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: mabel1015j on February 14, 2011, 06:42:21 PM
One time when i went to the " little Acme" for my big shopping trip, when i got to the cash register, i realized i didn't have my check book, and i had already been "checked out". I had been shopping there for at least ten yrs and it was small enough and had a stable enough staff that they did know their customers. When i went to the manager and asked if i could just leave my cart of groceries while i went home for my checkbook - i lived less than 10 blocks away, she  said "take it with you, i know you will be back." Even tho i knew she knew me, even i was surprised. ..... Jean
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 15, 2011, 08:28:55 AM
 Something similar happened to me, JEAN, many years ago.  I stopped
for gas a few blocks from my home, filled my tank, and then with my
mind on other things, drove away.  I hadn't gone far before it registered
on me what I had done.  I whipped the car around and returned, red-faced, to the gas station.  The guy in charge just grinned and said, "I
knew you'd be back."  Made me feel so much better.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 15, 2011, 12:42:33 PM
Babi, you were lucky.  If you had not been a familiar face, they probably would have had your license number and then the sirens chasing you.

Wegman's -- I have heard of that many times, but have never seen one.  Some authors have mentioned it in their books -- Margaret Maron, maybe?  It is mainly a southern store, or eastern?

I have seen part 2 of Dance to the Music of Time.  Still enjoying it and looking forward to part 3.

Did you all see Masterpiece Sunday night -- part 1, Any Human Heart?  Based on a novel by Scottish writer William Boyd.  Three actors portray the protagonist, Jim Broadbent his later years.
 
Last night I watched part of A Time to Kill.  I think the book is one of Grisham's best, and it will be interesting to see how closely the movie follows it.  I've seen several Grisham films, but not that one.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 15, 2011, 12:47:48 PM
I wrote a post this morning and it seems to have disappeared - however, I am so frazzled and fragile today (first day of packers, real start of big move) that I could easily have cancelled it myself  ???

Anyway, what I think I said was - a few months ago my son had to visit a physiotherapist in Fort William (ie the Highlands, a long way from here) - needless to say he had no money.  I called the physio and said I would put a cheque in the post but it might not arrive till after the appointment, especially considering the weather we were having at the time.  The physio said "No problem - it'll turn up; we trust people in the Highlands".  So it does still happen - but it wouldn't happen here, let alone in London, etc.

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on February 15, 2011, 08:49:42 PM
Rosemary - We have all been there and know what a ghastly process it is.  Even worse when no husband is around to help;  mine - divorced; yours - at work.  Shares the burden.  Please take care, one step at a time and the heavy part will be over.  Think of the adventures you will have in the beautiful city of Edinburgh when it is all over.  Your own Scottish Odyssey waiting for you.  Oh!  I forgot - also your first battered haggis waiting for you :o
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 16, 2011, 08:15:58 AM
 Oh, no fear of that, PEDLN. I realized my mistake and was back at
the station before the guy could have finished that call. 
  I did start "Any Human Heart", but didn't stay with it long. I
really didn't care for it and decided I could find something better
to do with my time.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 16, 2011, 10:11:47 AM
Pedln, I have been watching Masterpiece for over 40 years, but I just could not like ANY HUMAN HEART.  To tell the truth, I suspect strongly it was more the way it was filmed rather than the story itself.  I gave up halfway through and, just like Babi, turned to something else:  the book I am currently reading.

After you mentioned A Dance To The Music Of Time in here, I got my boxed DVD set out and last weekend watched it all.  Four DVDs.  Hours and hours.  I had pretty much forgotten it, so I must have viewed it the first time not long after my husband died.  What I saw and heard and read during that period is quite blurred in my memory cells.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on February 16, 2011, 10:27:08 AM
I ordered "Dance to the Music of Time" from Netflix. I haven't started watching them yet. They sent me the first two and then skipped over 3 and 4 to another movie. That makes me so mad. None of them were on wait so there was no reason to do that. I'm not sure I want to start them if I don't get the other two for awhile.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 16, 2011, 10:36:40 AM
jeriron, I think if you had them in order in your queue that they would send them that way.  I have No. 3 here, and No. 4 is now first in my queue.  Social Network has been first in my queue, designated "very long wait," then "long wait" and I see that they are now shipping it today.  I just kept thinking they'd skip over it forever.

As soon as I finish A Time to Kill I'll watch no. 3 and send it back so Netflix can send it on to you -- though I'm sure they have more than one copy.    :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on February 16, 2011, 10:48:45 AM
I had them in order.  Blockbuster would put a lock on a series and wouldn't send any of them if they didn't have all of them to send.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 16, 2011, 04:12:40 PM
I had  a similar experience with Netflix and Dance to the Music of Time.  They may not have very many copies.  I didn't mind that much, since I'm so familiar with the books that a gap didn't matter.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on February 22, 2011, 08:35:26 AM
I finally started "Dancing to the Music of Time". I'm enjoying it a lot. I sent one DVD back and am going to watch the second one this morning. Hopfully they won't take to long to get the next two out to me. I read that some people were'nt happy that they changed the main actors in the last disc instead of just making them look older like they did with the other cast members. Does anyone remember that?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 22, 2011, 09:57:01 AM
jeriron, I'm glad you're enjoying Dance to the Music of Time.  I sent Disc3 back this weekend, and Disc4 is on its way.  Wouldn't you know my disc3 had some bad spots on it.  I tried wiping and then washing it to no avail, but it wasn't enough of a problem to make me want to reorder.  I sent it back with a note and an email message.

I did not know that they changed actors on disc 4.  Hopefully I'll know who is who.    :D
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 22, 2011, 12:54:58 PM
(http://seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/graphics/bk2movies.jpg)
So many movies – how do  you choose what to watch?
Reviews?  Recommendations?  Actors?  Availability?
Do you choose a movie the same way you choose a book?

And where do you like to watch most of your movies?
Do you stream movies from Netflix and other places?
Where’s the strangest place you’ve ever watched a film?

_______________________________


Flixfind (http://www.flixfind.com/Weblog/)
Internet Movie Data Base (http://www.imdb.com/)
Upcoming Films from Books (http://www.abebooks.com/blog/index.php/2009/03/18/10-upcoming-movies-from-books-im-excited-about/)
Recent Movies Based on Books (http://www.bookreporter.com/features/books2movies.asp)
Movies Based on the Book (http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/readers/movies/)

(http://www.seniornet.org/gallery/larry/lines/mlti012.gif)

Join us in an ongoing discussion of your favorite movies right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln (ann.bartlett@att.net)




Pedln - the one they don't change is the amazing Simon Russell Beale, who plays Widmerpol throughout the whole series.  He is a genius.  I don't think you will have trouble recognising the others, although I do feel the last disc is not quite as good as the rest.  See what you think.

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 22, 2011, 03:24:11 PM
Jeriron, I actually enjoyed the fact that they changed some of the main actors.  I believe the man who is telling the tale from public school days onwards, Nicholas Jenkins,  is THREE different actors.  It not only did not bother me, but the actor who plays him in his older age is one of my very favorite actors, John Standing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 23, 2011, 09:05:12 AM
Somehow Dance to the Music of Time has slipped under my radar - haven't read the books and don't recall seeing the series. But my library has the books -published in four volumes with three books in each. Volume 1 is out on loan so have ordered it and will get it when it is returned. I spent a little time browsing through some of the others - it looks like an enjoyable read I've got coming up... thanks for talking about it. Will let you know how I find it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Mippy on February 23, 2011, 10:12:32 AM
Did anyone else see the news this morning in the financial pages?  Amazon is now ready to go head-to-head with Netflix, streaming movies to your computer.   Has anyone tried this?

Since I signed up for DirecTV, I have so many programs saved that I never watch movies.
However, I am saving all the episodes of EMMA  on PBS to watch over the next few weeks.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on February 23, 2011, 10:24:00 AM
I had never heard of A Dance to the Music of Time before either, until reading about it here. I've finished the second DVD and am enjoying it. Now we'll see if Netflix sends me the next 2. Or skips over them for awhile.

 
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 23, 2011, 01:07:13 PM
mippy, could you post just a teeny synopsis of this "Dance to the Music of Time"?  Somehow I've never heard of it - - books or DVD.  If this is so great, how have I missed it?  What year was the movie (tv?)portion made?  Was it a PBS Masterpiece series?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 23, 2011, 02:29:16 PM
A Dance to the Music of Time was a British television miniseries.  It is based on a series of twelve novels written by Anthony Powell.  It was first shown in the U.K. in 1997.  It is 8 hours long.  There are 4 DVDs in the boxed set.

Basically, it is a life lived out from the 1920s through the 1960s.  Nicholas Jenkins goes from public school through middle age.

I do not remember it being on Masterpiece Theatre or Masterpiece Classic, but that does not mean it was not.  I always watch Masterpiece, but then again, I have traveled and so forth.

On a scale of 1 to 10, I would give the story about a 5½.  The acting at least a 9 in most cases.  A couple of tens and a few less than others.  Worth watching for the acting, costumes and some of the scenery;  especially the works of art and the music.  Oh, the music!  It is a trip down Memory Path for me.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 23, 2011, 02:35:38 PM
Oh MaryPage - I would give the story at least 9 out of 10, the books are wonderful!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 23, 2011, 03:10:05 PM
Okay ladies, you've done me in!  I have put these in my Netflix queue, and will check my libraries' website to see if they are available here.  

MP if there is wonderful music from the 20's to the 60's, I'm all for it.  I watched a movie the other day that had some wonderful 40's music in it (can't remember the movie title, ha)

Was it someone here who recommended "Starting Out in the Evening" with Frank Langella?  I watched it this past weekend.  Wonderful acting, rather slow plot, no gratuitous sex, only one time a curse word heard.  Guess I would give it 4 of 5 stars. (note I said "gratuitous" sex.  There is some, but within the framework of the story)
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on February 23, 2011, 03:16:54 PM
Well I was wrong about Netflix. They are sending the last 2DVDs  out today. So there won't be a big break in-between them. I have to agree with an 8or9 for the story. I always think it's funny that the rich never seem to work and spend most of their time drinking at parties or bars or some sort.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 23, 2011, 04:05:41 PM
Yes, or else they have pretend jobs - my daughter and I were just saying that about Carrie in Sex & The City - she writes some pathetic column in the paper when she feels like it, and on the strength of that can apparently afford Jimmy Choos and a brownstone apartment in NYC  :)

I suppose that is at least partly what hacks Widmerpol off about many of his contemporaries - Stringham, etc - in the Dance.  He sets out to beat them at their own game, but from the end of the books (which I won't reveal) it is hard to fathom exactly what Anthony Powell's attitude to monied privilege is.

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 23, 2011, 05:07:54 PM
My Dance 4 disc came yesterday, but it will have to wait until I finish The Social Network – the Facebook movie, which I’m in the middle of watching for the second time.

Have any of you seen it?  I watched it the other night, enjoyed it and found quite a bit of humor in it, but  I had a bit of trouble at first, catching on to the flashbacks.  And too, the captions, at first,  seemed to move very quickly.  So I read this really informative article, below, and then decided to watch again and pick up what I missed. Much easier, the second time around.

Mark Zukcerberg (http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/09/20/100920fa_fact_vargas)


I think it’s very well-done, and Jesse Eisenberg does a terrific job.  He portrays the protagonist, a fictional Mark Zuckerberg, as an exceptionally bright, but very socially dysfunctional young man.  (You don’t get this feeling in the article above. He’s more mature now and has abandoned his sophmore arrogance.)  Justin Timberlake plays Napster founder Sean Parker, and Armie Hammer one of the Winklevoss twins.  Yes, he’s a baking soda great-grandson.

I highly recommend it.  But, if you haven’t felt like a dinosaur yet, you will.

BTW and off-topic – who is Lindsey Lohan?  I know she’s on probation for double DUIs and may be headed to jail for stealing jewelry, but is there some reason we care?

Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 23, 2011, 07:33:05 PM
No, there's really no reason "we care".  Her crap has been going on for about 2 years now, and she is a casualty of "celebrity".  Google her, but there's been so much stuff going on with her, I wwouldn't attempt to post any of it.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 24, 2011, 08:34:31 AM
I do not have the yen for or habit of watching celebrities, and goodness knows these days I rarely even know who they are talking about,  but I am a real news junkie, and watch Brian Williams, Katie Couric, Diane Sawyer, MSNBC and CNN and all of my local Washington, D.C. channels, and eventually something is said and shown of the latest disgraces of the pretty party people.  When I hear mention of Lohan there is no personal interest for me, but my heart twists a little at the memory of the sweet little thing who played the twins in The Parent Trap, wasn't that the name of it?  One hates to see anyone fall down the shute into a life of hell.  Gosh, I am so old that movie was a remake of an earlier gem starring Hayley Mills as the twins!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 24, 2011, 08:41:15 AM
 JERIRON, you do know, don't you, that you can go into Netflix, pull
up your queue, and move anything on it to the top if you wish.
Otherwise, Netflix just mails them in the order they were requested.
  Amazon is never going to be a competitor to Netflix for me. I
don't want to watch movies on a computer screen! I want to sit in
my comfortable chair in front of a decent sized screen...with cc,
of course.

   Oh, my, yes. The fascination with 'celebrity' escapes me entirely.
Apparently a great many do care; I just can't fathom why. Do we
have a social psychologist among us who can explain it?
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: jeriron on February 24, 2011, 09:39:54 AM
Babi

Yes I do know that.  Right now the top 8 on my list have a long wait on them.

I feel the same about watching a movie on my computer screen. I have a big screen but my TV in the living room is a 50" screen so why would I want to sit and watch it on a computer. I would like to figure out how to get them sent from Netflix to my tv but haven't done that yet.

Right now I'm in the middle of two series. The 3 and 4 disc comes today from Netflix "Dance to--". and I received from Amazon the "Downton Abby" DVD I ordered. I started that last night and am finished with the first one.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 24, 2011, 10:51:43 AM
I just brought home from the library a set of five films by John Cassavetes, A Woman Under the Influence, Shadows, Killing of a Chinese Bookie and others. Can hardly wait to watch them.

I saw them all back in the 1970s for several Saturdays where they were playing in a small theater and where I was usually the only one watching them. Loved the various characters played by Gena Rowlands, Ben Gazzara, Peter Falk and others.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 24, 2011, 10:53:51 AM
I saw The Fighter in a theater yesterday.  Wasn't sure I'd like a film about fighters, but I loved it.  Christian Bale was great and so was Melissa Leo who played the family's mother.  I hope she wins the oscar for supporting actress.  I'm going to look for more films with her in them.

Hope Colin Firth wins for The King's Speech.

Tomorrow we're going to see Biutiful with Javier Bardem.  Has anyone seen that one? 

We wanted to see Winter's Bone, but for some odd reason it doesn't seem to be playing anywhere in the Los Angeles-Southern California area.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 24, 2011, 07:23:19 PM
Final comments on Dance to the Music of Time: the mini series was never shown in the US, much to my frustration.  I didn't see it until I got it from Netflix.  I wonder what they think of this sudden demand?  I bet we're tying up their whole stock.

Gumtree, the books of the series go through an arc of quality, starting out mid level or not quite, reaching a plateau, then, in the last few, a low point then picking up a little.  I started reading them when only 5 were out, and Bob and I eagerly awaited each new one.  There is a huge cast, and people can disappear for half the series, then pop up in some odd way.  Many of the characters are recognizably based on real people.  I don't know who Widmerpool is, though.  Rosemarykaye, do you know?  Probably someone I wouldn't recognize, since I'm not that good at minor British political figures.

Now I'll shut up about my enthusiasm.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 25, 2011, 08:10:04 AM
 Valerie and I have been watching a series called "Lark Rise to Candleford" for some time now. I can't remember if I learned about
it here or elsewhere on SeniorLearn.  Now we're worried because the
series isn't finished, but we're not sure Netflix has the next couple of
seasons. We are quite wrapped up with some of those wonderful characters.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: MaryPage on February 25, 2011, 08:53:22 AM
I own the DVD sets for the first three years of Lark Rise to Candleford, and have Season Four on my wish list at Barnes & Noble.  Wonderful series.  Great acting and yummy costumes and sets.  Millie is my favorite character.

Linda Bassett, who plays Queenie, is outstanding.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 25, 2011, 10:36:39 AM
PatH : Love your enthusiasm - keep it up! My library is now holding the first volume of Dance for me ... will pick it up this weekend or maybe Monday.

It's as hot as Hades here and there is no respite in sight - typical Feb/March weather although this current hot spell has been very prolonged and without a break for a day to two to recover energy.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Tomereader1 on February 25, 2011, 11:35:53 AM
marjifay, you could probably skip Winter's Bone without thinking twice.  Although the lead actress is excellent, the movie is depressing to the Nth degree.  Once you've seen it, you will wonder why  and most probably won't care to see it a second time.  I wish I could think of whatever movie it is running around in my head that I could compare it to, but I'm not having any luck with that!  Maybe someone who has seen it (Winter's Bone) can come up with the comparison I'm searching for.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: maryz on February 25, 2011, 11:59:24 AM
Tomereader, I don't know about the comparison, but I certainly agree with your assessment of Winter's Bone.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 25, 2011, 12:57:57 PM
PatH - no, don't shut up!  It's my enthusiasm as well - I love the books and the TV series.

I wish I could look up Widmerpol in the book I mentioned earlier - "Invitation to the Dance" by Hilary Spurling - but unfortunately it is packed up in storage at the moment.  I do recommend this book - I referred to it constantly when I was reading the novels - she cross references everyone and tells you lots of little snippets - very helpful.

When I get my books back, I'll try to remember to look Widmerpol up.

Rosemary
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 25, 2011, 01:38:54 PM
I own that book too, but my memory is that she doesn't identify Widmerpool.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Babi on February 26, 2011, 08:41:44 AM
Millie is priceless, isn't she, MARYPAGE. And after all these
stories, I am still amused to hear of one more thing that is
Darcy's "only weakness".
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 26, 2011, 09:23:07 AM
I'm afraid I don't agree with Tomereader's and MaryZ's opinion of Winter's Bone.  I liked the movie, not nearly as much tho' as The King's Speech, The Fighter and The Social Network.  And I thought Dale Dickey, who played the scary old neighbor woman was terrific! It was just a small part, but I'd bet she'll be nominated for an oscar one of these days.  She has done quite a bit of TV, including the My Name is Earl series.  The only thing I noticed that didn't ring quite true about the film, was they did not have Missouri "twang" accents.  I lived as a child in southern Iowa about 5 miles from the Missouri border, and even there they had that drawl.  Anyway, I plan to read the novel from which the movie was made.

If you think Winter's Bone was depressing, don't see Biutiful with Javier Bardem.  I really liked this film, but it made me feel almost guilty and certainly grateful for the way I am able to live.  I thought Bardem and the woman who played his wife were excellent.  I'd hate to have to choose between Bardem and Colin Firth for the best actor oscar.

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: marjifay on February 26, 2011, 09:39:27 AM
Thanks PatH and Gumtree for the recommendation of the mini-series and books of Dance to the Music of Time.  I put the first volume,  A Question of Upbringing, on hold at the library and look forward to reading it..

Marj
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: pedln on February 26, 2011, 10:40:18 AM
I'm glad you liked Winter's Bone, Marjifay.  I really enjoyed it, although initially I didn't think I would.  Jennifer Lawrence did a wonderful job, almost a one woman show, and I was happy to see her get a nomination as best actress, though it's probably doubtful that she'll get it.

I've seen only three of the best picture nominees -- WB, Social Network -- liked it very much, and The Kids are All Right, which, after looking forward to it, I found to be a disappointment and don't understand how it managed to garner so many nominations.  From what's been said, it sounds like King's Speech and Colin Firth, and probably Geoffrey Rush are all headed for Oscars.  Maybe the other awards will be spread around a bit more.  Tomorrow night should prove interesting.

The King's Speech DVD is due to be released mid-April.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: rosemarykaye on February 26, 2011, 10:57:35 AM
PatH - Wikipedia says Powell confirmed that Widmerpool was based on Col Denis Capel Dunn, under whom Powell had served at the Cabinet Office.  Needless to say, I've never heard of him.  I think Widmerpool is probably a lot more famous!

R
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: PatH on February 26, 2011, 03:57:31 PM
I never heard of him either.  What a way to live on for posterity!
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: roshanarose on February 26, 2011, 11:58:37 PM
What about Colin Firth and Javier Bardem together in a movie?  We would probably all faint.  Tee Hee.  There is something about Bardem's face that is almost reptilian, even primal.  He transfixes me.  In "No Country for Old Men" (which I have seen 4 times) he definitely "underacted" and therein lies his appeal, for me at least.  It certainly helped that his costars were excellent.  I can't bring myself to go see that movie he is in with Julia Roberts as I dislike her. 

I haven't seen "The King's Speech" yet, but hope that our Geoffrey Rush wins an Oscar.  Would it be his second or third?  He got one for "Shine".  Not bad for a boy from Brissie.  My friend who I go to the movies with is on jury service all month so it is curtailing my movie viewing.
Title: Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
Post by: Gumtree on February 27, 2011, 12:14:59 AM
Rush - a boy from Brissie??  He was born in Toowoomba wasn&#