Author Topic: PBS Masterpiece Classic 2009-2010  (Read 76760 times)

JoanK

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 8650
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #80 on: January 04, 2010, 03:10:24 PM »
 

Masterpiece Classic 2010 brings back favorite authors and introduces new authors and programs. See the complete 2010 MASTERPIECE CLASSIC schedule.

NOW DISCUSSING

Small Island
April 18-25, 2010, 9pm

Two 90-minute episodes
When an ambitious Jamaican woman moves to gritty post-war London, she finds that the "Mother Country" is not the land of opportunity she had imagined. Starring Naomie Harris, Ruth Wilson and Benedict Cumberbatch and based on the award-winning, bestselling novel by Andrea Levy. Small Island is available for online viewing April 19 - May 25 at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/smallisland/watch.html



PAST PROGRAMS

The Diary of Anne Frank
April 11, 2010, 9pm

One 120-minute episode
The most accurate adaptation of Anne Frank's account of hiding from the Nazis stars newcomer Ellie Kendrick as the maturing teenager undergoing an extraordinary ordeal. The Diary of Anne Frank airs on Holocaust Remembrance Day, 2010. Watch the program online from April 12 through May 11 at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/annefrank/watch.html


Sharpe's Peril
April 4, 2010, 9pm

One 120-minute episode
The adventures of Colonel Richard Sharpe continue as he leads a ragtag party of civilians and soldiers on a march across India, with the murderous army of an opium lord in hot pursuit.  Watch it online through April 27 at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/sharpeschallenge/watch.html


Sharpe's Challenge
March 28, 2010, 9pm

One 120-minute episode
Soldier-adventurer Richard Sharpe comes out of retirement to quash a rebellion in British India. Sean Bean returns as the swashbuckling hero of this series based on Bernard Cornwell's novels. Top Chef's Padma Lakshmi guest stars. Watch it online through April 27 at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/sharpeschallenge/watch.html


The 39 Steps
February 29, 2010, 9pm

One 90-minute episode
Secret agent Richard Hannay battles German spies on the eve of World War I in a riveting and romantic new version of the thriller by John Buchan. Rupert-Penry Jones (Persuasion) stars as Hannay.  Learn more about this series at http://www.seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/masterpiece/39steps/39steps.html.  Watch the full episodes online at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/steps/watch.html through March 30. Email JoanP for a copy of the book for only the cost of postage. Read some of Buchan's works online at http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/b#a285


Persuasion (Encore Presentation)
February 21, 2010, 9pm

One 90-minute episode
Sally Hawkins plays Jane Austen's Anne Elliot, a woman destined for spinsterhood after refusing a proposal eight years earlier. Then her spurned suitor reappears. Learn more about this series at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/persuasion/index.html. The text of Jane Austen's Persuasion is available online at http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/105


Northanger Abbey (Encore Presentation)
February 14, 2010, 9pm

One 90-minute episode
In a medieval house that appeals to her most lurid fantasies, romance addict Catherine Morland (Felicity Jones) begins a relationship with the younger son of the estate in this adaptation of the Jane Austen novel.  Learn more about this series at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/northangerabbey/index.html. The text of Northanger Abbey is available online at http://www.gutenberg.org/files/121/121-h/121-h.htm#2HCH0001


January 24-February 7, 2010, 9pm

Three episodes.
A new adaptation of Jane Austen's comic tale of a headstrong young woman's failed matchmaking schemes. Learn more about this series at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/emma/index.html.
See resources provided by PBS at http://www.seniorlearn.org/bookclubs/masterpiece/emma/emma_links.html


January 10-17, 2010, 9pm
Return to Cranford

Two 90-minute episodes.
The construction of a new railroad line is at once thrilling and threatening to the residents of Cranford. This sequel stars Judi Dench, Imelda Staunton and Julia McKenzie. New faces include Jonathan Pryce and Tim Curry. From the creators: “We leapt at the opportunity to include two strands from Cranford that we hadn’t been able to include the first time around, introducing two colourful new characters: Lady Glenmire (Celia Imrie) and the conjuror Signor Brunoni (Tim Curry). We looked for additional source material to weave into the mix, and finally settled on two very different Gaskell stories that excited us: The Moorland Cottage and The Cage At Cranford." Learn more about this series at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/cranford2/index.html.


December 20, 2009-January 3, 2010, 9pm
Cranford (Encore Presentation)

Three episodes (Episode one 120 minutes; episode two 60 minutes; episode three 120 minutes).
The Emmy-nominated drama about a small English village in 1842 on the brink of change — where some find romance and opportunity, and others fear the breakdown of social order. The series is based on three Elizabeth Gaskell novels: Cranford, My Lady Ludlow and Mr. Harrison's Confessions. Learn more and see a preview at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/cranford/index.html.

Discussion Leaders:  JoanP and marcie


JoanK

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 8650
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #81 on: January 04, 2010, 03:13:39 PM »
Yes, I enjoyed it thouroughly! The young doctor, the only eligible young bachelor in Cranford, completely oblivious to the effect he was having on all the women around him. Very well done. And of course the whole thing was unrealistic but a lot of fun.

marcie

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 7751
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #82 on: January 05, 2010, 12:15:37 AM »
LOL, yes the poor young doctor. I thought all of the cast members were great and I enjoyed the episodes very much. I'm reading Cranford now and recognize many of the details in the episodes.

I'm looking forward to viewing "Return to Cranford" as I don't want to leave these characters yet.

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #83 on: January 05, 2010, 08:23:33 AM »
 With a sigh of relief, I report that "Return to Cranford" is scheduled for
the reported dates by my local station.  I was also pleased to see that
these episodes are also based on Elizabeth Gaskell stories, with 'strands'
from Cranford that were not included in the first shows. I do appreciate
that background info. Marcie makes available for us.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

JoanP

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 10391
  • Arlington, VA
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #84 on: January 05, 2010, 09:57:29 AM »
Babi - that's good information.  I'd been wondering whether "Return to Cranford"  was based on Elizabeth Gaskell's work - or if it was something "made for TV" .  Knowing the new series is based on "strands from Cranford"  is good news.  I'm really looking forward to it.

Happy that you have received your copies of the book.  Please do write to thank PBS for making those copies available to us.  By the way - there is still one more book waiting for a home if you are interested - or know someone who might be...

Happy 2010 everyone!  Just curious - do you say "twenty-ten"  - or "two thousand ten"  when referring to this new year?  I have also heard "O ten"...

Aberlaine

  • Posts: 179
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #85 on: January 05, 2010, 02:04:18 PM »
I've been watching the Cranford series on the PBS website.  I just can't stay up late anymore.  On the site, the episodes are broken into chapters, so you can watch just a bit and take a break.  I'm about to go watch the third episode of Cranford.

I'm also reading the book.  I find it curious that both doctors were introduced early in the movie, but I've yet to read about them in the book, and I'm on page 71.

I'm calling our new year, two thousand ten.  I haven't heard anyone call it anything else, but, to each his own.

Nancy

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #86 on: January 06, 2010, 08:12:09 AM »
Two thousand ten is probably correct, but with our American penchant
for taking the shortcut, 'twenty-ten' will probably be more popular. How many of our 'new' words are simply shorthand for longer words?
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

CubFan

  • Posts: 187
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #87 on: January 06, 2010, 10:02:55 AM »
Greetings -

I heard on a newscast earlier this week that the preferred usage is  20  10  based on past practice -   

17  76;     18   12;    19   45   etc.     The Normans invaded England in    10   66,     Jefferson bought the

Louisiana Purchase in    18  03  etc.   Of course,

we don't know what the people of the time were saying  -  just how we now refer to them.

Mary
"No two persons ever read the same book" Edmund Wilson

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #88 on: January 07, 2010, 09:04:37 AM »
 Makes perfectly good sense to me, MARY.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

pedln

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 6694
  • SE Missouri
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #89 on: January 08, 2010, 12:00:56 PM »
Someone said she was using 0 10  and I kind of like that.

Just finished watching part2 of Cranford, taped because I was out of town.  Enjoyed it a lot. 

Did you shed a tear when Harry read the poem over Mr. Carter's casket?  One of the most moving scenes in the show.  I thought it was a nice touch too, showing MR. Carter putting the poetry book in Harry's pocket, and then later Harry placing the same book with Mr. Carter in the casket.  Something like that probably doesn't show up in the book.

It will be interesting to see if 'Return' is truly a sequel or just scenes that weren't included in the original.

JoanK

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 8650
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #90 on: January 08, 2010, 08:08:46 PM »
they have most people paired off, but there are a few left over. The young(ish) woman who stays with Judi Dench. And this new brother (maybe Dench and her brother will live together).

marcie

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 7751
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #91 on: January 08, 2010, 11:01:14 PM »
Pedln, yes, I very much liked that scene with young Harry reading the poem over the casket. It was very moving. That boy is a wonderful actor with such a wonderful face. I hope that he does well with his acting career.

JoanK, I too am wondering if Miss Mattie will live with her brother and if the young woman who visits her will get paired off (maybe with the eye doctor).

Aberlaine

  • Posts: 179
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #92 on: January 09, 2010, 06:59:40 AM »
I mentioned in one of my posts that I was reading the copy of Cranford that Joan so kindly sent to us.  I was wondering why there had been no mention of doctors in the book.

I found the answer online.  I just read that the movie, Cranford, was created using three of Elizabeth Gaskell's books.  And one of them was about doctors.   It was mentioned on the PBS website: "Based on three Elizabeth Gaskell novels (Cranford, My Lady Ludlow and Mr. Harrison's Confessions), and boasting an all-star cast, Cranford breathes life into one town during one extraordinary year."

Here's the website link if you want to read more about Ms. Gaskell:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/cranford/

Nancy

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #93 on: January 09, 2010, 11:59:26 AM »
I like that, too, PEDLN. It was one of the best scenes in the film, IMO.
I also liked the one where My Lady pledges herself to honor Mr. Carter's
wishes as fully as Harry does.

 I don't think it likely that Miss Mary will resume her friendship with
the eye doctor. When she discovered the harm his mischief had done, she
wrote him that she could never again hold him in the same regard. (I
cannot remember her last name!)
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

EvelynMC

  • Posts: 216
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #94 on: January 09, 2010, 10:51:52 PM »
I just finished watching Episode # 3 online.  I enjoyed it very much.  I seem to enjoy watching online.  It is so much easier for me to hear everything clearly.

I am also reading the book, and because it is so light weight I can read it when I go to bed at night.  The book seems to be somewhat different, but it is also enjoyable in its own right.  So I am enjoying both the book and the PBS version as they are presented and not comparing them.  I figure they'll give me an in-depth view.

Did any of you watch the on-line snippets of remaking the village?  What a transformation...I remember when they made a movie using downtown Hot Springs, and the makeover...what a transformation.

I'm looking forward to tomorrow night.

Evelyn

Aliki

  • Posts: 814
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #95 on: January 11, 2010, 08:53:59 PM »
Evelyn, I couldn't have put it better myself!! I felt exactly the same way and am still reading the book and can't wait until next Sunday when they complete "Return to Cranford."

I'll call this the book that weaned me from too much t.v.! I'll have to find every book this author has written and read them.

I was saddest about Harry but it looks like he is being watched over in the end.

I couldn't believe Martha died in childbirth.

More later...just had to write and say how much I love this book.

aliki


JoanK

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 8650
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #96 on: January 11, 2010, 09:14:22 PM »
I enjoyed the episode last night, too. I loved the scene on the train. We'll see what next week has in store.

joangrimes

  • Posts: 790
  • Alabama
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #97 on: January 11, 2010, 10:47:33 PM »
I loved last night's episode.  I am really looking forward to next week .  It is really and enjoyable experience.

Joan Grimes
Roll Tide ~ Winners of  BCS 2010 National Championship

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #98 on: January 12, 2010, 08:27:54 AM »
 I couldn't help but be amused that the Cranford ladies attributed to their
short train ride both the salvation of the railroad and a demonstration of
the power of the 'female'.   ::)
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

JoanP

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 10391
  • Arlington, VA
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #99 on: January 12, 2010, 02:48:36 PM »
Babi - it is amusing, isn't it?  Where are the men of Cranford?  They don't stick around.  I've seen our "ladies"  described as "Amazons" - Cranford is based on Gaskell's hometown of Knutford in Cheshire.   I'm guessing hers was a town of "Amazons"  as well?  I too plan to read the other two Cranford books she has written.

Quote
 “A man is SO in the way in the house!”
 I think they really believe that.  Looking forward to next week's installment, but would really be surprised to see a man settle here with the ladies.  

Quote
I can't wait until next Sunday when they complete "Return to Cranford."
I'll call this the book that weaned me from too much t.v.! I'll have to find every book this author has written and read them.
More later...just had to write and say how much I love this book. Aliki
Aliki  - loved your comment  - may we use it in our News line?

Speaking of the book - I have to admit I've missed one of your requests for a free copy of the book.  I have TWO copies left on my dining room table.  Thought I had one - may have missed sending out a copy to someone who requested it.  So very sorry.
If you would like a copy of the book - please post here and I'll get in touch with you right away.  Alliemae, Arletta, Aberlaine - did I miss one of you?    Would anyone be intersted in recieving a copy - this one has Judi Dench on the cover - a nice souvenir, I think.  Honestly, can you imagine anyone else playing Miss Mattie after this performatnce?


 

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #100 on: January 13, 2010, 08:42:27 AM »
 I don't even think about who is playing Miss Mattie during the performance.  It's just Miss Mattie, true to the life.
  JOAN, you did get the stamps I sent you for the book postage, didn't
you?  Surely you did, but confirmation would be reassuring.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

EvelynMC

  • Posts: 216
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #101 on: January 13, 2010, 02:26:56 PM »
I watched "Return to Cranford" Sunday night and was completely enchanted.  I agree, Judy Dench is Miss Matty.

The looks on their faces during the train ride was priceless.

I'm looking forward to next Sunday night.

Evelyn

JoanP

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 10391
  • Arlington, VA
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #102 on: January 13, 2010, 10:28:06 PM »
Babi - yes I did receive the stamps - the Purple Heart stamps, right?  I'm sorry, I thought I had mentioned getting them. Thank you.  I still have two books to give away - Judi Dench's image is on the  cover, a really nice souvenir of this experience, I think.  Please email me if you would like a copy...

I'm not exactly sure why the ladies of Cranford changed their minds about the railroad.  I did see the expression of delight on their faces as they rode the train. - but I missed the preceding scenes.  Can you explain it?  They had been so opposed to it.  Today I read that the railroad had been running between London and Manchester since 1830.  Manchester is only a few miles from Cranford/Knutsford.  Because of the protests of the Cranford residents, the railroad didn't come to this town until 1862.

Today I finally sat down and read the opening chapters of Elizabeth Gaskell's book.  Glad I did. Who is the narrator?  It's Ms. Gaskell, right?  She actually stays in the house with the Jenkins'  ladies - and then when she gets back to her own town - Manchester -  she corresponds with them. She likes Miss Matty - portrays her as "different"  from the ladies of Cranford, don't you think?  She is not as rigid, nor does she agree with Miss Jenkins - Miss Deborah - on every point.  All though she doesn't always speak her mind.  In fact she defers.

In this case, though there are minor differences, I am happy to be reading the book, while watching the PBS production - they compliment each other.  I have a feeling it is because Judi Dench IS Miss Matty - as you say, Babi and Evelyn...

marcie

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 7751
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #103 on: January 13, 2010, 11:01:48 PM »
Joan, I think that Martha's husband leaving Cranford with the little baby (Tilly is it?) made Miss Mattie reconsider the railroad. She said that many of the young people would leave if Cranford wasn't going to grow and that all of the townspeople wanting to hold on to traditions wouldn't have anyone to pass the traditions onto. She said that her sister always said to look at all sides of an issue and she urged the other townspeople to try out the train so that they all could judge for themselves.

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #104 on: January 14, 2010, 08:33:56 AM »
JOANP, I saw delight on some faces, and apprehension on others. There
was considerable relief, as well as triumph when the trip was over.
  I was going to answer your question about what led up to that expedition, but I see MARCIE has taken care of it. Miss Matty spent a long and prayerful night coming to her decision, but she was able to change her views. I think she has become one of my favorite fictional characters.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

JoanP

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 10391
  • Arlington, VA
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #105 on: January 14, 2010, 09:12:13 AM »
Thanks - Miss Matty's decision to ride the train makes sense - I am going to have to watch that episode again...I must have dozed off during the preceding train-ride scenes and they were very important from what you and Marcie have said.
Do you see Gaskell's  Cranford as an indictment of the invasiveness of the railway into the English countryside -  or simply an example of reluctance to change?  Or both?

Reading Gaskell's introductory description of Miss Matty - I see Judi Dench.  The casting director must have felt the same way.  Babi, Miss Matty has become one of my favorite fictional characters too - and Judi Dench remains at the top of my list of favorite actresses.  She is one of the few actresses d'un certain âge who continues to get leading roles.  She is ubiquitous - on the stage, film and television too!

Aliki

  • Posts: 814
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #106 on: January 14, 2010, 10:19:19 AM »
Quote
JoanP, re: "Aliki  - loved your comment  - may we use it in our News line?"
Oh dear...what an honor! Of course you may.

I got the feeling that in organizing the train ride, Miss Matty had finally become her 'own woman'...first time since the life and death of Deborah. Did any of you feel that way too?

Ah yes, the facial expressions. Whoever was responsible ( maybe a joint effort between director, actor and photographer?) certainly ran the gamut as Babi mentioned...that was such a 'telling' part of the story.

JoanGrimes...you've got it in one! If there is any one word to describe this series, I agree it is an 'enjoyable' experience.

It was so enjoyable I found myself once again wishing I had lived in the 18th/19th century--probably 19th--however, as always, then I think of the plumbing and decide, on the other hand, I'll stay right here and just read 19th century literature!


Aliki

  • Posts: 814
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #107 on: January 14, 2010, 10:24:41 AM »
Just a note. Thanks all for your prayers and positive energy for my daughter Dara. She came through a very difficult surgery. Please keep praying as she has not had the results yet and that will be the next hurdle.

I just noticed the Winnie-the-Pooh quotation at the top of the page. I will copy it and send it to Dara in a note. It's seems so timely and appropriate.

aliki

JoanK

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 8650
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #108 on: January 14, 2010, 02:49:59 PM »
Aliki: I'm so glad Dara is doing well. I will keep her in my thoughts.

I'm reading "Cranford" and enjoying it thoroughly. I love to read about Cranford, but know myself well enough to know I could never live there. As soon as I was told that THIS was the right thing to do, I would do THAT!

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #109 on: January 15, 2010, 08:35:09 AM »
Quote
Do you see Gaskell's  Cranford as an indictment of the invasiveness of the railway into the English countryside - or simply an example of reluctance to change?  Or both?
 
  All of that and more, JoanP.  One hates to see lovely country
side torn up and invaded.  And people are naturally reluctant to see
major changes in their life. But there is also a recognition that the
small towns that the railroad bypasses tend to become even smaller
and less prosperous.  There's many a ghost town in the world, not far
from where a railroad passed them by.

I agree, ALIKI. Miss Deborah was such a strong personality; Miss Matty
always followed her lead. It wasn't easy for her to take an action that
she thought her sister would have disapproved, but she thought it
through for herself and did what she felt was right.

Quote
As soon as I was told that THIS was the right thing to do, I would do THAT!
 
  Why, JOANK, I never realized what a contrary soul you were.  ::)
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Aliki

  • Posts: 814
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #110 on: January 15, 2010, 10:50:55 AM »
Quote
Re: Alliemae, Arletta, Aberlaine - did I miss one of you?


If you mean this alliemae, a.k.a. aliki, a.k.a. 'Cheeky'...I did receive my book and am savoring it like a delicacy!

Thanks again!

Aberlaine

  • Posts: 179
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #111 on: January 17, 2010, 07:25:45 AM »
Speaking of the book - I have to admit I've missed one of your requests for a free copy of the book.  I have TWO copies left on my dining room table.  Thought I had one - may have missed sending out a copy to someone who requested it.  So very sorry.
If you would like a copy of the book - please post here and I'll get in touch with you right away.  Alliemae, Arletta, Aberlaine - did I miss one of you?    Would anyone be intersted in recieving a copy - this one has Judi Dench on the cover - a nice souvenir, I think.  Honestly, can you imagine anyone else playing Miss Mattie after this performatnce?


Nope, I got mine, Joan.  And am almost finished with it.  I love the book and the program.  I'm going to miss all the ladies terribly after tonight's episode is finished.  I wish PBS would make a series about Cranford.  I'm sure they could come up with many stories to tell!

Aberlaine

  • Posts: 179
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #112 on: January 17, 2010, 09:14:25 AM »

Today I finally sat down and read the opening chapters of Elizabeth Gaskell's book.  Glad I did. Who is the narrator?  It's Ms. Gaskell, right?

I always thought the narrator was Ms. Mary Smith, Ms. Matty's niece, but I could be wrong.  I'm just enjoying the book and the program so much!!

Nancy

Aliki

  • Posts: 814
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #113 on: January 17, 2010, 11:32:31 AM »
Quote
Aberlaine, "I always thought the narrator was Ms. Mary Smith, Ms. Matty's niece..."

I thought so too Aberlaine re: the Cranford book. Was the book about Elizabeth Gaskell the one narrated by Gaskell herself? I haven't gotten it yet.

All I know is I CAN'T WAIT UNTIL TONIGHT!!!!   ;D 

I am going to miss my Cranford friends! Guess I can't have it both ways!!!

JoanP

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 10391
  • Arlington, VA
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #114 on: January 17, 2010, 02:00:26 PM »
That was only a guess on my part - that the narrator is the author. - She has such insight into these characters.  Still haven't finished the book - up to Chapter IX - maybe we'll learn more about the narrator. 

At first I thought that the narrator was a friend of the Jenkins, she seems so comfortable visiting their home - but lives in Dumle (Manchester) In chapter VII, there are more clues that seem to support the idea that she is more a niece, than a family friend.  Mrs. Jamieson seems to hesitate inviting her to tea, "fearing that her father might be engaged in the cotton trade in Drumble, dragging the family out of aristocratic society."
Then when she finally does go to tea, she is handed some fashion books to look at while the ladies play cards - "young people like to look at pictures."

I'm trying to match the narrator with the characters we are watching in Return to Cranford.  The narrator is never mentioned by name in the book...



JoanK

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 8650
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #115 on: January 17, 2010, 02:07:41 PM »
I had assumed the narrator was the niece in the TV movie, which explains why there is no romance being set up for the niece. I'm really enjoying the book. It's organized differently; each little story is handled separately: on TV, they have several hanging at once. Each works well in it's medium.

JoanP

  • BooksDL
  • Posts: 10391
  • Arlington, VA
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #116 on: January 17, 2010, 03:21:45 PM »
Perhaps the PBS adapters put the niece in place of the narrator of the book?  So far, in the book, the niece is not introduced as a niece, though we can tell she is  young.  I was also struck by her modern ways - have you noticed how mobile she is - as she flits back and forth between Drumble and Cranford?  Does that come across in the TV production?
I tried to find something about Gaskell's narrator in the book - never to I find mention of Miss Smith, the niece -

 
Quote
The book is not all about the town on a general level, though; it starts that way, and then moves into the lives of particular characters. There is the narrator, first of all, who doesn’t live permanently in Cranford, but visits friends there frequently. We never discover much about her life, except that she has never traveled beyond the bounds of Cranford and her hometown. She makes a good narrator for the novel, as the inhabitants of Cranford ask her to visit whenever anything exciting happens, after which she heads home again, a circumstance which allows Gaskell to skip around in time at will, just giving us the good bits without having to fill in the rest or make awkward transitions from one time period to another. The novel is told in the first person, and the narrator’s voice is quiet and contemplative, as it should be to portray a place such as Cranford properly, but it is also sensitive to the humorous aspects of Cranford, and now and then gently ironic, showing the reader how odd and charming the place can be, but never criticizing or complaining about it. There were moments when I laughed out loud at some of the narrator’s observations.  http://ofbooksandbikes.wordpress.com/2008/05/25/elizabeth-gaskells-cranford/

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #117 on: January 18, 2010, 08:39:33 AM »
 That quote expresses it quite well, JOAN.  From the film, one
would simply assume Mary Smith is a major character.

 I missed the first half-hour of Cranford last night, to my great
disappointment.  The TV guide shows the program beginning
at 8:30.  Apparently it began at 8.  I was startled to find that
Mr. Brown had met and married since I last saw him, to a
woman I don't recall seeing before. I don't know what else I
may have missed.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Aliki

  • Posts: 814
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #118 on: January 18, 2010, 10:52:21 AM »
Quote
Babi: "I was startled to find that Mr. Brown had met and married since I last saw him, to a woman I don't recall seeing before."

Oh Babi...I'm so sorry you missed that part. I wish I could retell it to its advantage...maybe someone else can. It was a regular 'coup' for the ladies of Cranford over the one woman (I think the one with the dog) who was always 'too good' for the rest with her 'hoity, toity, snooty, tooty' attitude!!

As usual, our ladies won at the end.

I do hope you saw the part about Miss Pole assisting the magician!

aliki

joangrimes

  • Posts: 790
  • Alabama
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic: Cranford
« Reply #119 on: January 18, 2010, 12:36:17 PM »
The Cranford presentation was very, very good last night...I thoroughly enjoyed it...I sure do wish that it could continue....I am going to miss it.

Joan Grimes
Roll Tide ~ Winners of  BCS 2010 National Championship