Author Topic: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion  (Read 52029 times)

PatH

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #280 on: July 22, 2013, 08:46:48 PM »
It can be something Roman, too.

Frybabe

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #281 on: July 23, 2013, 08:20:22 AM »
I can think of two Roman writers that wrote comedy at the moment, Plautus and Apuleius. Apuleius's The Golden Ass was nominated before. I am not familiar with any of Plautus's works, but I understand he modeled his plays after the Greek plays.

PatH

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #282 on: July 23, 2013, 08:39:08 AM »
I've never read any Plautus, but I understand A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum is based on some of his plays.

Frybabe

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #283 on: December 07, 2013, 03:05:48 PM »
I think it is about time to think about reading another classical offering, maybe for after the holidays or for Feb.

My post of July 12, 2013 has a list we put together earlier. PatH pointed out that we haven't done any of the Greek bios that Plutarch wrote. She also suggested Plautus, whose plays, Pseudolus, Miles Gloriosus (The Swaggering Soldier) and Mostellaria (The Haunted House), are the basis for the play A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum. Pseudolus seems to be the primary influence.

Frybabe

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #284 on: May 18, 2014, 08:26:23 AM »
Hello, anybody home? This discussion group, sadly, seems to have died on the vine.

I am reading a Scifi book where one of the characters is trying to translate Antigone into the native language. It appears that the natives of this found (and apparently soon to be lost) civilization loves tragedy. Antigone is one of the plays someone nominated to read once upon a time back in 2011. I forget if we read it, but I don't see it in the archived discussions.


PatH

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #285 on: May 18, 2014, 11:38:45 AM »
It's there, Frybabe, filed under Women in Greek Drama.  We discussed it in May of 2012, and you were there.  I just spent the last hour rereading the discussion.  That translation would be quite a job.

Frybabe

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #286 on: May 18, 2014, 12:33:28 PM »
I thought we did, but then since I couldn't find it (looking in the wrong places) I decided it was my imagination. I expect a translation would be difficult considering the linquists in the book were still trying to get a full command of the language. It is really fun to run across little bits like that. Usually it is Latin passages or phrases. My last was "numquam demitto", never let go.

Robby

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #287 on: November 13, 2016, 12:32:18 PM »
I have just retired from my 25-year practice as a clinical psychologist and want to be back with you folks after a hiatus of 10-years plus.  Do I understand from the dates I have seen here that this section has not been active for a while? 

JoanK

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #288 on: November 13, 2016, 03:40:09 PM »
You are correct, but now you're here, we can change that. do you have something in mind?

Robby

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #289 on: November 13, 2016, 08:14:44 PM »
What would you consider as the definition of "Classics" and from that I may come up with a suggestion.

PatH

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Re: Nominations for our next Classics books discussion
« Reply #290 on: November 14, 2016, 09:49:46 AM »
It's pretty amorphous.  We started out doing Greeks and Romans, but other works have been suggested.  What's your suggestion?