Author Topic: Political Processes - Can we talk?  (Read 68129 times)

marjifay

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #560 on: November 12, 2016, 06:13:12 AM »
Someone here, I believe, mentioned they wanted to read Trump's book.  Re Trumps book, Art of the Deal, I listened recently to an interview with the co-author of that book who said Trump did not write it and he doubted very much if Trump had even read it.  He also said that as he got to know Trump, he believed the man is a psycopath and that his only concern is for himself.

Marj
"Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill."  Barbara Tuchman

Frybabe

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #561 on: November 12, 2016, 06:29:53 AM »
Psychopath (or sociopath) is the wrong term. He may be a narcissist though. Do a search and you will find plenty of websites that explain both.

marjifay

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #562 on: November 12, 2016, 07:11:56 AM »
Paychopath, sociopath, or whatever, I was just repeating what the co-author of the book said                                         about Trump during the interview. I have no knowlege of the accuracy of his opinion.

Marj.
"Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill."  Barbara Tuchman

Frybabe

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #563 on: November 12, 2016, 09:16:47 AM »
I know, Marj, I was just pointing out that he may have used the wrong term. My limited education in Psychology doesn't give me the best knowledge background, and I certainly never met Trump, but from all the descriptions I've seen in the media, I'd say he exhibits some narcissistic traits. I can see, however, where the author might consider his behavior as psychopathic. I think there is some overlap in behaviors associated with both, like being egotistical and maybe a lack of empathy. It depends on degree and what other traits the person exhibits. You're going to make me drag out my old Psychology books (what is left of them), aren't you.

I see that the Diagnostics and Statistics Manual is up to version V. now, so some of the criteria have changed, possibly a lot, since I had my hands on a DSM-III.

BarbStAubrey

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #564 on: November 12, 2016, 02:02:44 PM »
Regardless if he personally wrote the book he has a string of books - they may all be shadow written - but I want to find the essence of the man - all we have is what the campaign machine to make him appear unworthy has said about him. Sure he has flaws but then I look at his family and obviously he did something right - if in these books his tactics to get things done is explained than we have a better understanding of how he solves problems.

So I found used copies of - The Art of the Deal - Think Like a Champion: An Informal Education in Business and Life - Crippled America: How to Make America Great Again.

I did notice the 10 initiatives listed in the news yesterday to help Black Communities were the chapter titles for his book How to Make America Great Again. Had any of us read his books we would have picked up on it and picked up on lots of things he was saying at his various conventions instead of just all the ways he was not fit that the media cooperated with the Clinton decision; that was announced if you remember at the Dem Convention when they said everytime Hillary mention Trump was when she received the loudest and longest reaction and so, that was what they decided would be the focus of her campaign speeches - the result, none of us picked up on what Trump said other than his Paris Hilton approach for attention or how he was proving the focus for Hillary of his not being worthy that was supposed to highlight her worth. 

I am not trying to review who started what - only that this man is going to be the president - I do want to learn something about him - so far I see he has disdain for those in the GOP who did not support him and has disseminated the GOP - I also read that he was a Dem until about 5 years before he ran for office - so what does that mean - I may not be able to deduce what we can expect but at least I can learn how he goes about his decision making.

I am not willing to take sides and keep going with the vitriol of the campaign - its over - how I feel about this president elect is not helping me if I only evaluate him based on what was said by him to gain free attention and by his opponent to elevate her own voteability - I'm thinking it is time to go beyond emotion and start learning more about the man.

I am aware as the vote was split as the nation is split but I choose to learn rather than stay with my media affected preconceived opinions. 

mogamom

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #565 on: November 12, 2016, 02:27:17 PM »
Trump talked about keeping those two provisions of Obamacare, if he can work it out, in his campaign speeches.  So, I wasn't surprised to hear it.

There were things he said that caught my attention:
           At his convention speech he said: "I understand the dignity of work."  Wow!  That was big!
          When someone accused him of not understanding the ave. American because he was a billionaire, he agreed that he was wealthy and stated that he wanted to help everyone do well.
          To the W. Virginia coal miners he said that renewables are not practical yet and that miners could be re-trained in renewables as they grew and be offered first dibs on those jobs (Clinton offered federal subsidies to families instead)

A black woman did a personal video from her car with her two boys in the back seat.  She was excited and said she was on her way to vote.  She said that because she was a woman and African American she was supposed to vote Democrat, but she was voting for Trump; she was not a slave and did not live on the Democrat Plantation; she cited a speech Micelle Obama gave on TV1? (a predominately black channel?) where viewers were told:  It doesn't matter what they said, it doesn't matter what they've done, you need to get to the polls and vote straight Democrat."  This woman said no one was going to tell her how to vote - that she was voting for jobs instead of the old rhetoric that has kept blacks down.  She even said that white people were not the only ones who had slaves - that blacks were often given authority over slaves and helped keep them in line, suggesting that that was what the Obamas were trying to do.

Whatever else this election has done, it is finally at least different in terms of the power grid in Washington, I think.  I wish Soros (MoveOn.org) would give up the rioting - but I suppose making 24 billion dollars as a  Hedge Fund Manager (weren't they responsible for the '08 recession?) isn't enough for him.  And I see that the NYT is vowing "to rededicate themselves to reporting honestly"!

I've known about Donald Trump my whole adult life (since I live in NY); he's often been in the tabloids, as you can imagine.  I never heard of any rapes or unsolicited attention to women; offensive talk was plentiful and was always meted out fairly among all - an equal opportunity offender, you might say.  But there are more stories than you can shake a stick at of his abundant generosity, willingness (eagerness) to learn and get feedback from his workers (and to use that information to improve the project), and generally to encourage everyone to do better.  I don't think his idea is to do things for people, but to 'unleash their potential' - that is, to help them to do for themselves and to experience the pride and dignity that comes from building something for yourself.

His claim to bring every job in "ahead of schedule and under budget' has pretty much rung true - even in this election.   I do think he values excellence and quality in work and in people, whoever they are.  That he sticks right now with people he trusts as he navigates largely unchartered waters is not surprising to me.   I'll wait and see in what directions he moves.  It may be that he felt that the Democratic Party had left him.   

PS  My last DSM IV would hardly show Trump as a Psychopath or Sociopath; terms loosely thrown about, I think.  If you'd ever worked with either group I don't think you'd use those terms to describe him.  And one man's narcissism is another man's pride of accomplishment?

Frybabe

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #566 on: March 15, 2017, 11:58:48 AM »
Belatedly, I am reading a copy of Foreign Policy Magazine which had in its Feb. issue an article about insurance companies and slave insurance policies. I noted that the article says that the slave trade was banned in 1808, but I wonder if that meant bringing new slave in from overseas rather than within the country. I thought slaves were still being bought and sold within the country all the way up to the Civil War.

http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/01/16/decoder-slave-insurance-market-aetna-aig-new-york-life/

BarbStAubrey

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #567 on: March 15, 2017, 02:33:30 PM »
The U.S. Congress passes an act to “prohibit the importation of slaves into any port or place within the jurisdiction of the United States…from any foreign kingdom, place, or country.”

The first shipload of African captives to North America arrived at Jamestown, Virginia, in August 1619, but for most of the 17th century, European indentured servants were far more numerous in the North American British colonies than were African slaves. However, after 1680, the flow of indentured servants sharply declined, leading to an explosion in the African slave trade. By the middle of the 18th century, slavery could be found in all 13 colonies and was at the core of the Southern colonies’ agricultural economy. By the time of the American Revolution, the English importers alone had brought some three million captive Africans to the Americas.

After the war, as slave labor was not a crucial element of the Northern economy, most Northern states passed legislation to abolish slavery. However, in the South, the invention of the cotton gin in 1793 made cotton a major industry and sharply increased the need for slave labor. Tension arose between the North and the South as the slave or free status of new states was debated. In January 1807, with a self-sustaining population of over four million slaves in the South, some Southern congressmen joined with the North in voting to abolish the African slave trade, an act that became effective January 1, 1808

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/congress-abolishes-the-african-slave-trade

The Slave Trade Act 1807 or the Abolition of the Slave Trade Act 1807, was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed on 25 March 1807, with the title of "An Act for the Abolition of the Slave Trade".


Frybabe

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Re: Political Processes - Can we talk?
« Reply #568 on: March 15, 2017, 04:31:46 PM »
Thanks for looking that up, Barb.