Author Topic: Classics Forum  (Read 228437 times)

okietxjenjen

  • Posts: 841
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #360 on: September 28, 2011, 11:19:27 PM »


CLASSICS BULLETIN BOARD


Paestum

Paestum, a complex of Greek Temples in  Southern Italy.

Interested in Latin Courses? Learn More About Our Latin Courses


Welcome to our Classics Bulletin  Board, which is our public discussion for those interested in the Classics. Since our Latin Classes are not visible to the public but we have a great many people interested in talking about the Classics, we've put this discussion up for your interest.

Please share here news, clips, magazine or newspaper articles, movies or television shows and especially books  you find that would be of interest to those of us who love the classics world.

Everyone is welcome!




Just out!


We are very excited to announce the 5th edition of our Ezine Ecce, a publication of our SeniorLearn Classics Project and it's incredible this time. Our UK Editor, Maryemm, has outdone herself, and Marcie's work on the layout put the icing on the cake.

We have articles by Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London, a very interesting short piece on Sian Phillips, who played Livia in the I, Claudius production and who turns out to be, like Boris Johnson, a total fan of Latin.

We have articles by  prominent archaeologists,  Cambridge Don Mary Beard, articles of new finds and old places, and best of all, we have articles by our own current Latin students which are absolutely fascinating  on a variety of wide ranging subjects. What a talented and accomplished student body we have here! I particularly like the fact that each of our 6 Latin classes is represented in this issue.

Take some time to immerse yourselves in this exciting issue! We hope you enjoy it!

http://seniorlearn.org/classics/ecce/ecce5/titlepg.html 




Frybabe

  • ..
  • Posts: 8238
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #361 on: September 29, 2011, 08:33:18 AM »
Thanks okietxjenjen. I've seen something similar to the computer mockup somewhere (old TV documentary?),oh, maybe five or six years ago. There were two of them, both circular in shape, one for commercial and one for military. Alexandria? Phoenician? Does anyone remember anything like that? Anyhow, this is a great new find. I am looking forward to reading more or,hopefully, seeing a documentary about it.

Athena

  • Posts: 2722
  • Hello from Atlanta, GA~USA
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #362 on: October 15, 2011, 11:22:26 AM »



Saturday, October 15

Virgil

Publius Vergilius Maro (also known by the Anglicised forms of his name as Virgil or Vergil) (October 15, 70 BCE – September 21, 19 BCE) was a classical Roman poet, best known for three major works—the Eclogues (or Bucolics), the Georgics, and the Aeneid—although several minor poems are also attributed to him.

Virgil came to be regarded as one of Rome's greatest poets. His Aeneid can be considered a national epic of Rome and has been extremely popular from its publication to the present day. His work has influenced Western literature. His epic, the Aeneid, had followed the literary model of Homer's epic poems Iliad and Odyssey. The story is about Aeneas's search for a new homeland and his war to found a city. This type of character is similar to Western heroes in the books of Owen Wister and Louis L'Amour.

Virgil's father was a wealthy landowner, who could afford a good education for his son that included schools in Cremona, Mediolanum, Rome and Naples. After considering briefly a career in rhetoric and law, the young Virgil turned his talents to poetry.
"Better by far you should forget and smile than that you should remember and be sad." ~ Christina Rossetti.

ginny

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 52778
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #363 on: October 23, 2011, 08:46:24 AM »
I've come in with  some very sad news this morning of the sudden unexpected death of our Gumtree in Australia, on October 7.


Her husband wrote of her love of the Latin program and her joy of being associated with it, and I am so sorry to learn of this devastating news.

We will really miss her, her sharp mind, her encyclopedic knowledge,  her sense of fun, and her unfailing support.

I thought you would want to know.  Here is a link to the profile of her she very kindly allowed us to use in featuring our participants when this website first went up:

http://www.seniorlearn.org/about/profiles/profilegumtree.html




Athena

  • Posts: 2722
  • Hello from Atlanta, GA~USA
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #364 on: October 23, 2011, 11:37:51 AM »
I'll miss Gumtree right here on the Classics Bulletin Board, as we all will, I'm sure.  What a wonderful profile piece she has shared with us, a testimony to a true Renaissance woman whose skills extended even to the presentation of herself in writing. Her family has been fortunate to share her life - and now her legend.
"Better by far you should forget and smile than that you should remember and be sad." ~ Christina Rossetti.

Frybabe

  • ..
  • Posts: 8238
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #365 on: November 10, 2011, 08:54:18 PM »
It's been mighty quiet up here and in the Lounge. What is everyone up to? 

Since I am unlikely to be taking any spring accounting classes, I've decided to get back to my Latin studies. I downloaded Benjamin D'Ooge's Latin for Beginners just to see what it was like. I believe Ginny mentioned Dr. D'Ooge on occasion. So far, I am impressed by the extensive beginning section on the phonetics for speaking Latin. By next Fall's new classes I should be back up to speed.

I also downloaded a book called Latin Literature by J. W. MacKail. It is a history of, rather than writings from, Latin literature. It should be interesting.


Athena

  • Posts: 2722
  • Hello from Atlanta, GA~USA
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #366 on: November 11, 2011, 07:03:12 AM »
Glad you are jumping back into the pool, Frybabe.
"Better by far you should forget and smile than that you should remember and be sad." ~ Christina Rossetti.

Tomereader1

  • Posts: 1464
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #367 on: November 11, 2011, 10:52:42 AM »
I attended an author talk at my library on Wednesday. (Kathleen Kent/The Heretic's Daughter) and she mentioned someone whose name I had not thought of in years, but that I'm sure a lot of you here had read unstintingly:  Mary Renault and her books on ancient Greece.  I must go back and re-read some of those.  Just thought I'd pass that one on to all the Classics lovers.
The reading of a fine book is an uninterrupted dialogue in which the book speaks and our soul replies.


André Maurois

Lucylibr

  • ...
  • Posts: 3888
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #368 on: November 15, 2011, 12:02:09 PM »
People living in or near NYC might be interested to know that classics scholar Mary Beard is speaking November 30, 7:00 p.m., at the 42nd Street library.  Tickets are $17 and can be purchased online at the New York Public Library website.

Maryemm

  • :
  • Posts: 629
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #369 on: November 16, 2011, 04:47:40 PM »
Quote
Mary Beard is speaking November 30, 7:00 p.m., at the 42nd Street library
Lucylibr

Well if someone does go along, please, do write an account for "Ecce" !

Maryemm

  • :
  • Posts: 629
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #370 on: November 29, 2011, 11:54:33 AM »



Quote
I've really got down to pulling together the  big lecture I'm giving in New York on the 30th November (thereby -- all being well -- missing out on the strikes on this side of the Atlantic). It's at the New York Public Library, where I am ashamed to say I have never been -- but they have a wonderful website and loads of historic images online (really useful). And it's a lecture in honour of Bob Silvers, the editor of the New York Review of Books... who will be there. So I had better make it good!



Professor Mary Beard



Lucylibr

  • ...
  • Posts: 3888
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #371 on: December 01, 2011, 12:53:38 PM »
About Mary Beard: a very challenging and engaging lecture to a large audience at NYPL.  I can't summarize all my impressions here, because I have to go to Spanish class, which Mary thinks is alright; she just says that the best way to learn Spanish, let's say, is by studying Spanish and not studying Latin as a way to approach Spanish.  Too often we have said that Latin is the best key to other studies, and that's not really why we should study the classics. 


Everybody does not have to study Latin and Greek, just some people (I guess that includes us.)  But we need to have respect for those who do know Latin and Greek and use the classics responsibly, find out what they are really about instead of using platitudes about them such as that the Greeks "discovered" democracy: not true, just the word for it.  She is upset by misquotes and misunderstanding of classics that garble them.

People have been bemoaing the decline of the classics since the Renaissance, and talk about them as though they are a sick patient, or a dead one, for which an autopsy is in order.  But if they are truly in decline, why is so much written and said about their decline, why are so many interested in it?  Such conversations are mixed with nostalgia, a longing for the past.  We long for a dialogue across the gap of time with with our cultural past.

We need to have a sense of wonderment about the world of the ancients.  Scholars say we have so little that remains, but really there is so much, more than one person can read in a lifetime.  We need to ventriloquize the ancients, I take it that means to make them real and speak today.  Isn't that what you, Ginny, are doing, and Mary Beard in her book about Vesuvius which I bought?

By the way, Bryant Park, right next to the library, is a magical place this time of year, with very busy public ice skating rink and many specialty shops with mostly handmade goods and foods.  The Christmas tree (and I am not a big fan of such) is splendid in silver and blue.  There is seating, tables, and plenty of room for all.  I wonder if Mary got to see any of this or just where she was taken after the lecture.

I'll try to get something together for ECCE. When is the deadline?
 

Maryemm

  • :
  • Posts: 629
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #372 on: December 01, 2011, 03:13:28 PM »
Hi, Lucylibr. Lucky you being able to attend the lecture.

Deadline for "Ecce" is December 10th. I look forward to hearing from you if you decide to go ahead.

Frybabe

  • ..
  • Posts: 8238
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #373 on: December 09, 2011, 07:56:54 PM »
I just started reading an old book by Dudley Wright called the The Eleusinian Mysteries and Rites. Since the author stated that Eleusis is now Leusina, I decided to find out where it was exactly. Either the author misspelled it or they since added the E back on the name to make it Eleusina. Anyhow, I finally found it not too far north of Athens. Here is a link to the photos that I found through the Google maps. Impressive.

http://maps.google.com/maps?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=s&hl=en&biw=1096&bih=654&q=Eleusis&gs_upl=6545l11088l0l11360l9l9l1l0l0l0l225l1321l1.4.3l8l0&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x14a1ae4c9ab8d99f:0x400bd2ce2b97e50,Eleusina,+Greece&gl=us&ei=1aniTsKmO6PW0QGB5I33BQ&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=image&resnum=3&ved=0CEAQ8gEwAg

Someone also put up a photo of a sarcophagus (Roman, it says) from the area.

http://maps.google.com/maps?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&channel=s&hl=en&biw=1096&bih=654&q=Eleusis&gs_upl=6545l11088l0l11360l9l9l1l0l0l0l225l1321l1.4.3l8l0&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x14a1ae4c9ab8d99f:0x400bd2ce2b97e50,Eleusina,+Greece&gl=us&ei=1aniTsKmO6PW0QGB5I33BQ&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=image&resnum=3&ved=0CEAQ8gEwAg

roshanarose

  • Posts: 1344
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #374 on: December 12, 2011, 08:38:10 PM »
Hello Fry

Unfortunately Eleusina is probably one of the most neglected sites on the mainland.  The surrounds are heavy industrial and that bay is where all the big oil tankers dock.  Polluted very badly.  Sad to say that that bay is all that is left of Salamis, once the waters upon which Athens won a great victory against the Persians. 

If you keep going along that road, which is the main road to the Peloponnese, you pass over the Gulf of Corinth into Corinth (fascinating place) and onto Mycenae.  I have done that trip twice.  You can trace it on the map link you included.

I hope you enjoy the book.
How can you prove whether at this moment we are sleeping, and all our thoughts are a dream; or whether we are awake, and talking to one another in the waking state?  - Plato

ginny

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 52778
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #375 on: December 18, 2011, 08:24:06 AM »
What marvelous conversations here, thank you all so much!

Are you all finished with your holiday shopping?

Two days ago somebody picked up a fabulous bauble for under their own tree!  Sothebys auction Friday  in New York City revealed an incredible piece of Roman statuary, Leda and the Swan, 2nd century, which was expected to bring from $2,000,000 dollars to 3,000,000 but the Times of London reports that the price was run up 10 times by vigorous bidding by four bidders to a whopping winning bid of  19,122,500 USD. Wow!

The Times  reports that the 4ft 5 inch statue was owned by the current Marquess of Zetland, and was considered "part of the furniture" (wouldn't you love to see THAT house, Aske Hall in North Yorkshire?) and they were shocked.

It was discovered by an antiquities specialist on a  visit to the hall.  The 1st Earl of Zetland had brought it home after buying it in Rome during the late 1700s, which should not be a surprise, if you consider the state of archaeology at that time. It had been even exposed to the elements as a garden sculpture before it was taken inside 40 years ago.

So dust off that stuff in your attic and out in the garden, you might also have a Roman antiquity waiting. :)


(I remember seeing a British program once about right of way across some peer's field and we all trooped out with the film maker and the peer  to one of the storage sheds on the back of the estate to find something pertaining to the old signs,  and he had to try to push out of the way what appeared to be piece after piece  of  priceless Roman and Greek statuary stacked in any old fashion,  in a shed to get to what he wanted. It was jaw dropping.)

That's a nice bonus for all concerned, I bet.


http://www.sothebys.com/en/catalogues/ecatalogue.html/2011/antiquities-n08810#/r=/en/ecat.fhtml.N08810.html+r.m=/en/ecat.lot.N08810.html/16/






And of course what would the holiday be without the incomparable Ninguat, Ninguaat, Ninguat, translation by our current 301 class.  Bet you can't stop singing it. :)



 

                         
Let it Snow! Let it Snow! Let it

Snow!



Let It Snow was created by lyricist Sammy Cahn and the composer Jule Styne in 1945
Latin Rendition by SeniorLearn's current Latin 301 Class:

Click and sing along!


O!  tempestas est terribilis
Sed focus est iucundus
Et nemo  ambulat,
Ninguat! Ninguat! Ninguat!  

  Non ostendit pausae signa,
Et ad crepanda tuli frumenta.
Et lux hebetata erat.
Ninguat! Ninguat! Niguat!  

  Cum postremo besiamus valē-
Haud amabo in procellā ire.
Si mē amplectaris firmē--
Ad domum prodecam calidē

  Ignis moritur tardē
Etiam nunc, Delicia, dicimus "valē"
Sed dum tē  amas mē-
Ningue! Ningue! Ningue!


English Lyrics and Music and More  
 

         





 





mabel1015j

  • Posts: 3571
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #376 on: December 19, 2011, 02:15:59 PM »
You all may know about this, but i was browsing the internet today and found this site that is a course about the Latin language. I immediately thought of this site and evened wondered if this was your discussion, but i read further and think not.

http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=406290&direct=1


I see you mentioned Mary Beard, might she be related to the Beard family historians in the U.S., mid 20th century? I love that Mary Beard's books of women's history and still use quotes from them when i do presentations on women's history.


Frybabe

  • ..
  • Posts: 8238
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #377 on: December 22, 2011, 02:13:45 PM »
I ran across a photo of Roman ruins at a place called Baalbek. I had never heard of it, so I looked it up. Lo and behold, it is what used to be called Heliopolis. Now that name I do know.  http://sacredsites.com/middle_east/lebanon/baalbek.html

roshanarose

  • Posts: 1344
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #378 on: December 22, 2011, 09:10:43 PM »
Frybabe -Sun City - I wonder if they had a water slide too :)  Very informative about Baalbek, but my PC thinks it is already on vacation and wouldn't allow me to browse the site.  I hope to be able to convince it (my PC) to do its job soon.

Ginny - That Carol/Christmas song  is so beautifully presented.  Thank You.  I thought I would take a peek at the Sotheby's link you provided.  The peek was an hour long!  Great site - I was impressed with the excellent clarity of the videos and ask anyone who wishes, to buy me that pink diamond.
How can you prove whether at this moment we are sleeping, and all our thoughts are a dream; or whether we are awake, and talking to one another in the waking state?  - Plato

ginny

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 52778
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #379 on: January 05, 2012, 07:53:30 AM »
I'm glad you enjoyed the carol, I love it, myself, they did a super job.

More big news about Latin!

3 days ago Newsweek came out with an article on 31 Ways to Get Smarter in 2012.

#10 is Learn a Language:


Quote
Mastering a second language gives a workout to your prefrontal cortex, which affects decision making and emotions. Enroll in a class, embed in deepest Sichuan province, or simply pick up Rosetta Stone software and teach yourself Latin.


Nothing equals being IN a Latin class, and for 9 years we here on SeniorNet and now SeniorLearn have offered Latin classes to literally hundreds of students world wide.

Music to the ears of the army of Latin enthusiasts all over the world, who knew that already. Here's hoping that the New Year will bring everybody just a little Latin!

The article goes on to say:


Quote
For more exalted cognitive functions, the strategy with the strongest evidence behind it is also the toughest: learn a second language. When a brain that is fluent in two languages chooses between, say, English and French, the cortical circuits that hold both languages become active. The prefrontal cortex must then step in to choose the right word—man or homme?—for the circumstances. The prefrontal is also the site of those higher-order functions. The workout it gets in bilingualism carries over, buffing such IQ-building skills as problem solving and attention switching, finds cognitive scientist Ellen Bialystok of Canada’s York University. That workout seems to postpone dementia by five years, she and colleagues reported last February.



Learn more:   http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2012/01/01/buff-your-brain.html
Here's the list:   http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2011/12/30/31-ways-to-get-smarter-in-2012.all.html

Happy New Year!


ginny

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 52778
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #380 on: January 31, 2012, 05:48:19 PM »
We are very excited to announce the 5th edition of our Ezine Ecce, a publication of our SeniorLearn Classics Project and it's incredible this time. Our UK Editor, Maryemm, has outdone herself, and Marcie's work on the layout put the icing on the cake.

We have articles by Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London, a very interesting short piece on Sian Phillips, who played Livia in the I, Claudius production and who turns out to be, like Boris Johnson, a total fan of Latin.

We have articles by  prominent archaeologists,  Cambridge Don Mary Beard, articles of new finds and old places, and best of all, we have articles by our own current Latin students which are absolutely fascinating  on a variety of wide ranging subjects. What a talented and accomplished student body we have here! I particularly like the fact that each of our 6 Latin classes is represented in this issue.

Take some time to immerse yourselves in this exciting issue! We hope you enjoy it!

http://seniorlearn.org/classics/ecce/ecce5/titlepg.html  

Frybabe

  • ..
  • Posts: 8238
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #381 on: January 31, 2012, 08:35:37 PM »
I am speechless. Well almost. What a supremely outstanding edition of Ecce. You've all outdone yourselves this time. Grātulātiō!

nancymc

  • Posts: 348
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #382 on: February 01, 2012, 04:21:15 AM »
I have just finished reading Ecce I should be somewhere else but could not stop reading once I started, what a superb publication.     It was hard to take it all in at one reading so I will go back again and again,   There was so much to learn.  Congratulations to Mary and all concerned.

What a honour to have my poor old visage printed for all to see.

Nancy

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #383 on: February 01, 2012, 08:54:52 AM »
GINNY, ECCE looks positively scrumptious.  It's gorgeous.  I've saved it to a
text file so I can read it at my leisure.  My congratulations to Marcie for the
beautiful layout.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Athena

  • Posts: 2722
  • Hello from Atlanta, GA~USA
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #384 on: February 01, 2012, 05:44:40 PM »
CONGRATULATIONS TO MARYEMM, FOUNDING AND CONTINUING EDITOR OF ECCE!  YOU HAVE DONE A GREAT JOB FOR ALL OF US AGAIN.

AND TO MARCIE FOR THE GREAT LAYOUT JOB GO MORE KUDOS. 














"Better by far you should forget and smile than that you should remember and be sad." ~ Christina Rossetti.

Mippy

  • Posts: 3100
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #385 on: February 03, 2012, 08:45:31 AM »
Well done, Maryemm!   Jolly well done, as some say!!  Fantastic !!
also
to Marcie!  Great work on the layout!
quot libros, quam breve tempus

Frybabe

  • ..
  • Posts: 8238
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #386 on: February 05, 2012, 12:32:59 PM »
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, GINNY!

I know I am a day late, shame on me.

ginny

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 52778
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #387 on: February 05, 2012, 05:18:43 PM »
:) Thank you, Frybabe! :)

roshanarose

  • Posts: 1344
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #388 on: February 05, 2012, 08:38:11 PM »
Ginny - ...... and so say all of us!!!
How can you prove whether at this moment we are sleeping, and all our thoughts are a dream; or whether we are awake, and talking to one another in the waking state?  - Plato

ginny

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 52778
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #389 on: February 05, 2012, 09:48:41 PM »
:) hahhaa  Thank you!

Maryemm

  • :
  • Posts: 629
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #390 on: February 06, 2012, 06:34:34 AM »
At Chedworth Roman Villa (Glos.)a  new conservation shelter has been built to protect some  of the largest and most impressive Roman mosaics still in situ.The mosaics will now be better protected from frost and damp.

Read all about the Villa here at any of these links:



http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/chedworth-roman-villa/


http://www.chedworthromanvilla.com/

http://www.chedworthromanvilla.com/chedworth-roman-villa-photographs.htm

http://www.theheritagetrail.co.uk/roman%20britain/chedworth_villa.htm

.........................

My THANKS to ALL who liked "Ecce" and said so!

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #391 on: February 06, 2012, 08:37:07 AM »
I'll echo Roshana Rose. At least I'm not the only one late to
wish you well, GINNY.  My heart is in the right place, even when
my mind isn't.
 
 MARYEMM, I love to visit places like that, sit, and imagine
people going about their daily lives there. That third link
has some really good pictures. The mosaic floor, all tiny tiles,
is beautiful.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Maryemm

  • :
  • Posts: 629
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #392 on: March 01, 2012, 04:19:35 PM »
February 2012

Discovery of a Roman Cemetery in Djerba


See: http://www.tunisia-live.net/2012/02/14/discovery-of-a-roman-cemetery-in-djerba/



..............................



Reconstructing the Hallaton Helmet


See:  http://www.archaeology.co.uk/uncategorized/reconstructing-the-hallaton-helmet.htm

Babi

  • Posts: 6732
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #393 on: March 02, 2012, 08:23:08 AM »
 Great links, MARYEMM.  I expect we'll be hearing more, eventually, from Djerba. I love to
mentally 'reconstruct' a place and a time.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Maryemm

  • :
  • Posts: 629
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #394 on: March 06, 2012, 02:05:10 PM »


 
  Students to study little-known scholarly language of the Renaissance
 

                                         
by Cynthia Lee and Aaron Dalton



Mar 01, 2012 
[


Read more here at:   http://today.ucla.edu/portal/ut/learning-the-little-known-language-229883.aspx

Frybabe

  • ..
  • Posts: 8238
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #395 on: March 06, 2012, 06:15:24 PM »
Oh, how interesting MaryEmm. I didn't know there was a Renaissance Latin, only an Ecclesiastical Latin. So they are not the same?

ginny

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 52778
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #396 on: March 08, 2012, 09:39:26 AM »
No and how fascinating, and exciting. Thank you SO much Mary!! The very thought of untranslated Latin texts out there is mouth watering to any Latinist, kind of like finding the Fountain of Youth. How exciting to read this and the new finds in Tunisia.

I read not very long ago in the latest issue of Archaeology what the Arab Spring has really done to the endangered archaeological sites in those countries: it's quite sobering as you might expect:

http://www.archaeology.org/1201/features/topten_arab_spring.html


Maryemm

  • :
  • Posts: 629
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #397 on: March 17, 2012, 12:55:35 PM »



Set in the reign of the Emperor Domitian Lindsey Davis's new book


                                                       
Master & God



                                         
will be published in the US  5th June 2012   



Frybabe

  • ..
  • Posts: 8238
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #398 on: March 17, 2012, 02:57:56 PM »
Goodness. Not my favorite Emperor. Thanks for the heads up, MaryEmm.

Maryemm

  • :
  • Posts: 629
Re: Classics Bulletin Board
« Reply #399 on: March 22, 2012, 05:46:40 PM »

               Hoard of Roman coins found near Roman Baths in Bath