Author Topic: PBS Masterpiece 2017  (Read 2001 times)

ginny

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Re: PBS Masterpiece 2017
« Reply #80 on: April 08, 2017, 01:26:47 PM »
 
See the 2017 MASTERPIECE schedule

Let's talk about PBS programs that we enjoy.

DISCUSSING NOW


Home Fires, Season 2 - Final Season
April 2 - May 7, 2017

The Final Season of Home Fires follows the women of an English rural village as they are separated from their husbands, fathers, sons and brothers during World War 1 and must forge alliances among their diverse community.


Wolf Hall - Encore Presentation
April 2 - May 7, 2017

An encore presentation of Season 1 from 2015 of Wolf Hall. Adapted from Hilary Mantel’s best-selling Booker Prize-winning novels Wolf Hall and its sequel, Bring Up the Bodies, Wolf Hall follows the complex machinations and back room dealings of accomplished power broker Thomas Cromwell, who must serve king and country while dealing with deadly political intrigue, Henry VIII’s tempestuous relationship with Anne Boleyn, and the religious upheavals of the Protestant reformation.

ALREADY DISCUSSED


To Walk Invisible The Bronte Sisters
March 26, 2017 (2 hours)

Written and directed by Sally Wainwright (Happy Valley, Last Tango in Halifax), To Walk Invisible depicts the evolution of secluded, dutiful clergyman’s daughters into authors of the most controversial fiction of the 1840s.



Victoria, Season 1
January 15 - March 5, 2017

A diminutive, neglected teenager is crowned Queen Victoria, who navigates the scandal, corruption, and political intrigues of the Court, and soon rises to become the most powerful woman in the world.


Sherlock, Season 4
January 1 - 15, 2017

Sherlock (with Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman) returns with three brand-new episodes that promise laughter, tears, shocks, surprises and extraordinary adventures.


ginny

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Re: PBS Masterpiece 2017
« Reply #81 on: April 08, 2017, 01:29:46 PM »
Not as pretty as Claire Foy. :) Nor the German Anne of Cleves, whom he thought was ugly. Look at those eyes of Cromwell, tho!

 I have to say tho that this morning thanks to Netflix, I was able to begin to watch the new  2017 season, the 5th year,  of Father Brown's series.  We can't get it here in the US on DVD, it only came out in  the UK a couple of months ago and hasn't been converted yet, but it's streaming on Netflix, and  there are 15!!! new episodes! Since the Latin classes are out this week, I'm binge watching.  The first is a Christmas one, and THAT one I am going to add to my  yearly viewing of Christmas Fare. Hokey? Maybe. Predictable? Maybe. Super fun? Definitely!

I did notice, however, in the last  scene when they raised a glass to "absent friends," that it was Sid and not "Monty" who was mentioned. I like Sid, a lot.  I don't think we've ever met "Monty," have we? Poor Felicia, he seems absent a LOT but no glass was raised to him.


Frybabe

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Re: PBS Masterpiece 2017
« Reply #82 on: April 10, 2017, 09:26:31 PM »
Just watched  an interesting video I ran across in my Amazon video, Holbein: Eye of the Tudors. It was obvious that the maker of the video was unhappy about the new version of history which is turning More into the bad guy and Cromwell into the good guy. Apparently Mantel is not the only one to express this revisionist version of history.

Okay, so I have a question. If Holbein was the one who painted the picture of Anne of Cleves which the King claimed deceived him as to Anne's beauty, then how is it that Cromwell got executed and not Holbein as well?

ginny

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Re: PBS Masterpiece 2017
« Reply #83 on: April 11, 2017, 10:07:37 AM »
Maybe that's why it has taken Mantel so long to write the 3rd book. :)

Wasn't Holbein famous for his likenesses? Henry liked the portraits Holbein did well enough of him and his children.

That's a good question. I don't know enough about British history to answer it.

 I have a feeling there's more to it than that, and that Norfolk and Gardiner had a hand in it, rivalry and jealousy,  and jockeying for position in the court...And then there was that  odd little thing in the first program where,  was  it Henry who asked  him about his feelings toward the clergy? And you can see Cromwell's stance.  He must have made a lot of enemies, especially in the dissolution of the monasteries.  I am interested, myself, in how he fell, but it was a serpent's nest he was dancing in, politically, anyway.

My thought on it is that Mantel is not as revisionist as she was trying to make the case that he wasn't the absolute monster he's been formerly portrayed as;  she's thrown in lots of unsympathetic things he did. There are always two sides. And so in the movie  they cast  Rylance with those sympathetic eyes, and he made the case pretty much.... for the movie, anyway. Holbein painted a different Cromwell, just LOOK at those piggy, mean little eyes, and if Holbein's as accurate as his fame insists, she MAY in fact BE doing revisionist history, it's a novel, after all.

Fascinating, isn't it?


ginny

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Re: PBS Masterpiece 2017
« Reply #84 on: April 11, 2017, 10:12:15 AM »
I have to ask, is that Wolsey's ring on Cromwell's finger in the portrait?? Is that why the movie made such a point of it?

Frybabe

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Re: PBS Masterpiece 2017
« Reply #85 on: April 11, 2017, 12:22:58 PM »
I hadn't noticed the ring in the portrait, Ginny.

I did notice that Rylance did a good job of getting his facial expression right. And I noticed that Holbein used a similar expression for several of his paintings, including his wife. They all seem to be there, but not there with that gaze. Kind of circumspect maybe, or like you might look if you were day dreaming or just not thinking about anything? I'd say sad, but that doesn't quite describe it. It struck me that Rylance's Cromwell, like the painting, didn't show any real (or intense) emotional expression, just that distant gaze no matter what was going on. Holbein's portrait of More is a bit different. There you can see an intensity in the forward leaning posture, in the eyes and to an extent, the facial expression, showing a keen interest in something not shown in the portrait.

Holbein didn't live more then a few years after Cromwell's execution. He died of the "sweating sickness" that took Cromwell's wife and girl's. I was wondering what it referred to and here is an answer. No one really knows, but many now think, thanks to the Four Corners outbreak in 1993, it was a form of hantavirus. http://theconversation.com/what-was-sweating-sickness-the-mysterious-tudor-plague-of-wolf-hall-37194

ginny

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Re: PBS Masterpiece 2017
« Reply #86 on: April 13, 2017, 07:32:28 AM »
Oh interesting, thank you! I wondered myself on the "sweating sickness," what a horror. That's why Henry VIII kept moving his court, to get away from whatever it was.  It's a miracle any of them ever lived between the plagues and this strange sickness:  imagine a broom causing such!!!  You can't win, can you? Try to keep a clean house and look what it gets you. :)

There's another portrait of Cromwell Holbein did and the eyes are different. He seems to have pretty much really hit at Cromwell in the one we know.  It interests me that the man playing More in this production looks more like the Erasmus painting of Holbein than he does the More one. That intense look you cite  can be taken  more than one way in the Holbein, too.

The Frick Collection which has supposedly the most accurate Holbein has another one of him by Jacobus Houbraken(1698−1780) and he looks a little different in the eyes area. He's almost normal looking here:

http://collections.frick.org/media/view/Objects/1020/511?t:state:flow=8143ea50-a31c-4bba-b574-bd04c55d9a41

Obviously not done from life. And this roundel from  Wikipedia is interesting, so all together there are more portraits of him without those awful eyes than with them, but that, perhaps, is what Holbein saw.


Frybabe

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Re: PBS Masterpiece 2017
« Reply #87 on: April 13, 2017, 08:42:42 AM »
The broom, yes. Hantavirus is a nasty thing that can be airborne spread. That is why, if you check on how to clean up mouse infested areas, you see recommendations to first wet down the area with bleach or the like, allow it to set a little bit and than wipe the stuff up, oh, and wear a dust mask. The premise is that wetting the area down will keep a lot from becoming airborne and the bleach may kill the virus.