Author Topic: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories  (Read 3196 times)

PatH

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Re: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories
« Reply #120 on: September 13, 2017, 07:11:46 PM »
heading

PatH

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Re: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories
« Reply #121 on: September 13, 2017, 07:13:11 PM »
That link worked fine for me.  Good story, well told, kind of touching.

Frybabe

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Re: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories
« Reply #122 on: October 10, 2017, 06:18:33 AM »
Something different in the land of short story SciFi. Amazon Prime will be airing a new series next year called Phillip K. Dick's Electric Dreams. Here is IMDB's page with trailer:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5711280/ Click on the Episode Guide to see the description of the upcoming episodes based on Dick's short stories. I don't recognize any of these, but then I only read a very few of his stories.



Frybabe

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Re: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories
« Reply #123 on: October 28, 2017, 04:48:42 PM »
I am trying catch up on some of the short stories I downloaded quite a while ago.

This one, by Dallas McCord Reynolds is called Ultima Thule I downloaded mine from Project Gutenberg, http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/30334 It is about a guy who is hired by a little known government agency to track down a person named Tommy Paine (named after Thomas Paine of Common Sense fame) who has supposedly been encouraging insurrections, wars, and the like on many planets. It is about 82 pages.

The other, is Thin Edge by Randall Garrett, where a guy from the asteroid belt is on Earth investigating the disappearance of a friend. This one is about 24 pages. Another Project Gutenberg find http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/30869 it is also available free on Amazon.

Both are light, with a bit of humor. I enjoyed them very much.

Oh, I did a little research on the meaning of Ultima Thule since I thought that is what Iceland is sometimes called. Iceland is simply Thule, and Ultima Thule refers to Greenland. Also, the term was used in Medieval times and before to indicate those places beyond the known world.

PatH

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Re: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories
« Reply #124 on: November 04, 2017, 09:26:45 PM »
I enjoyed Thin Edge too.  Ultima Thule will have to wait until I'm caught up in Barchester Towers.

PatH

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Re: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories
« Reply #125 on: November 07, 2017, 08:25:42 PM »
In choosing stories to post here, I try to cover a wide spectrum of past and present, realistic and fantastical, hard science, and science only as a background, to show the great variety of this field.  The hardest of hard sci-fi authors I can think of is Hal Clement.  With him, it's all about physics, with characterization lagging well behind.  A typical scene has characters of various species brainstorming together about the physics of the current disaster.  I couldn't find anything of his online; either the copyrights are tightly held or no one bothers, but I did find this interesting list of Top 10 but Obscure Science Fiction Novels.  The description of Iceworld is accurate both for the book and for what Clement's stories are like.

That's the only one of the 10 I've read.  I remember the existence of the Leinster, but didn't read it, and have heard of Eric Frank Russell, but the rest are obscure to me at least.

Frybabe

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Re: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories
« Reply #126 on: November 21, 2017, 06:48:19 AM »
Early Ray Bradbury efforts. https://www.theverge.com/2013/8/22/4647008/read-futuria-fantasia-ray-bradbury-early-science-fiction-zine

The article has links to the Project Gutenberg issues and to Open Culture's audio of the first issue.

PatH

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Re: Science Fiction/Fantasy Short Stories
« Reply #127 on: December 04, 2017, 11:46:30 AM »
I finally got a chance to read Ultima Thule during the Thanksgiving Portland trip--very enjoyable.  I guessed part of where he was going, but not all.  Of course you wouldn't have such a high success rate of establishing new colonies, especially done by impractical groups of idealists, and it's hard to believe that there would be only one such complete sighting as described, but nothing's perfect.

My early exposure to Ray Bradbury consisted of reading some of The Martian Chronicles stories in popular magazines like Colliers and the Saturday Evening Post when they first came out.  The image of the blast shadows of the family on the wall of their still-functioning automated house stuck with me permanently.