Author Topic: Movies & Books Into Movies  (Read 318728 times)

ClassicsAdmin

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Movies & Books Into Movies
« on: January 02, 2009, 08:37:58 PM »
How many of you have read a book,
then watched a movie that was based on that same book?

Were you disappointed?
Or elated that they hadn't made any significant changes?
Or even surprised to discover the movie was even better than the book?



Join us in an ongoing discussion of this very popular subject right now.
Pull up a chair, take off your shoes, pour yourself a cup of coffee or hot chocolate, and join in!

Your Discussion Leader: pedln

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2009, 10:25:11 AM »
Welcome everyone, to the New Year and to our New Home.  What an exciting time this is for Books into Movies.  Have you seen or read The Reader?  A lot of folks are talking about it.  What are your thoughts?  And then there’s Revolutionary Road and Marley & Me and Doubt (from a play), not to mention Slumdog Millionaire and The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.   No doubt with dreams of Oscars dancing in their heads. I feel like my cup is running over.  How about you?

For those who like their films in homestyle comfort,  check out the link above – Books into Movies Now on DVD.

The popcorn is ready,  and there’s lots to talk about.  So come on in and tell us about the books that you want to see.

hats

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2009, 06:18:10 PM »
Thanks for the link, Pedln. I can't wait to see "The Reader" and "Marley and Me." I have read both those books. I missed the "Revolutionary Road" discussion long ago. I still haven't had the chance to read the book. I would like to read the book before seeing the movie.

Eloise

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2009, 06:21:32 PM »
Thanks Pedln for opening up a discussion about Books into Movies It will be a very popular discussion I am sure.

Recently I saw Love at the Time of the Cholera and I bought the book, and because we had discussed 100 years of Solitude by Marquez in the old SeniorNet I decided I would go and see the movie. I liked that movie very much, the theme was so different than what usually comes out of Hollywood. They even talked about religion NOT like if it was a disease, but something that the characters felt strongly about. Besides it is also a good love story. I don't want to say too much in case people want to see the movie and read the book. I have just started to read the book so I can't comment on it just now. Marquez is a Nobel Prize winner that needs to be savoured.

Another movie I saw last Friday was The Reader and there again I wanted to read the book because people I know recommended it to me. I loved both which is unusual for me because movies usually leave out too much to be able to compare favourably to the book.

Happy New Reading Year 2009 to everyone.
Those two I highly recommend seeing and reading.

Eloise

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2009, 06:23:55 PM »
Hi! Hats, we posted at the same time didn't we? I did the reverse, I saw the movie The Reader THEN I read the book. It's better like that for me because the movie might be disappointing, but I don't know about you. I liked both.

hats

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2009, 06:35:56 PM »
Hi Eloise,

It's so good to see your name again and read your post. With "Love in The Time of Cholera" I might try your method. I tried reading the book. I wasn't successful. Maybe seeing the movie will make me look at the book again. I'm glad you liked the movie. I'm going to put it on my queue now.

serenesheila

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2009, 08:39:21 PM »
Hi, all.  I just found this site.  It is good to see so many familiar names.  I have been down with a virus since the day after Christmas.  My ribs hurt from coughing.  I look forward to feeling better.

I haven't been going to movies for awhile.  Too much violence, and noisy people.  So, I usually wait until I can get a movie from Netflex.  Foreign cinema is my first choice.  People look like real people, not size 0 models.  The story usually is more complex, too.


Steph

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2009, 08:35:53 AM »
I loved Marley and Me as a book, so will try and see the movie. So many books lose so much when they become a movie. Especially if they are made because some star thinks they would be wonderful in it.. I guess ego is a real problem in Hollywood.
Stephanie and assorted corgi

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2009, 09:37:51 AM »
Welcome everyone, it’s so good to see you all here and to hear what you all think about this new crop of movies from books.  It always makes me happy when the movie powers-that-be think a book or a short story is worth a film production.

Eloise,  I’m happy to read your take on Love at the Time of Cholera, as I could not get into 100 Years of Solitude. (I know I’m in the minority there. Magical realism is not my thing.)  But Love . . .  sounds worth trying.  Let us know how the book compares.  And The REader -- I definitely want to see and read that.

Quote
Maybe seeing the movie will make me look at the book again.
   from Hats

Hats, I agree with you – re:  Love .  .  .  Sometimes seeing the movie first puts a different light on a book you might not otherwise pick up and read.

Sheila,  I hope you get over that bug soon.  In the meantime I hope you can lie back, not too much coughing, and watch your DVDs from Netflix.   I like foreign films, too, as I know I'll always "hear" them with the subtitles.  Read ARound the World will be opening soon, and I'm sure there'll be room for film discussion as well as books.

Steph,  if the film version of Marley and Me doesn’t suit, there’s another dog book into film coming in January, and I think there’ve been previews out on it.  Hotel for Dogs, based on a book of the same name by Lois Duncan.  (I remember her from our school library – a good Young Adult writer, usually with a touch of mystery.)

Tomereader1

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2009, 12:25:05 PM »
I am thrilled that Books into Movies is back with us!! ;D  I always enjoyed that category so much.  So, thanks Pedln for getting us back together.  I read "Love In The Time of Cholera" and watched the movie after.  There was much to like about each one, but I found the book a bit slow-going.  I know we don't have Book Exchange anymore, but I have a copy of "Love... if someone would like to have it.  Just email me with your snail mail address, and I'll send it along for just postage.

I am going to read "Revolutionary Road" and "The Reader", and then hope to see the movie.  They both sound excellent. 

Tomereader
The reading of a fine book is an uninterrupted dialogue in which the book speaks and our soul replies.


André Maurois

Steph

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2009, 08:00:50 AM »
Pedlin, Our 13 year old granddaughter is a Lois Duncan fan. I will tell her about the movie. I have been hearing reports on Marley that lead me to believe they dwell a bit much on the death, more than the wonderful exuberant life.
Stephanie and assorted corgi

Eloise

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2009, 08:29:52 AM »
re: Love in the Time of the Cholera and The Reader

Tomereader, In both cases I saw the movie first because when I read the book first I am always disappointed with the movie because it leaves so much out.

The Reader gave me a perspective on how the Holocaust is perceived by a non-Jewish German author. This book digs deep in the mind of man from his adolescence to his manhood as he deals with moral and pscyhological issues. It is a short and powerful 218 pages book that you want to read non stop from start to finish.

In contrast, Love in the Time of the Cholera that I am reading now is a book you want to linger on and not rush to turn the page to see what comes next. It is very descriptive and down to earth in easy flowing prose. I didn't follow the discussion "100 years of Solitude" but as it was mentioned before this author seems to dwell too long on matters of the heart and not enough on action. Even if the story seems to linger sometimes I don't want to stop reading it but I am not even half way yet, we will see. 

jeriron

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2009, 09:13:58 AM »
I saw Marley and Me. The end of the movie is about Marley death. I think they could have left the scene at the Vets when hr was  put  to sleep out. A little scary for smaller kids. but the rest when he was sick and when they said a prayer in the yard where they buried him was a nice family scene and there was nothing wrong with children seeing that kind of emotion. It's real life.

jeriron

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2009, 09:21:46 AM »
I try not to compare a movie with the book. I try to take it as two separate things. Lots of stuff gets left out and sometimes more characters get added. People picture what characters look like in the book and then get dissapointed on who plays that part in the film.

Re Marley and Me. Owen Wison with his scaggy blond hair doesn't look anything like John Grogan.

Babi

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2009, 10:31:49 AM »
HATS, how great to hear from you again!  I  get a lift from every new name I see here from the old group. Seeing your post is like hearing from an old friend after a long absence.

Sheila, you are so right. 
Quote
People look like real people, not size 0 models.
  I've often thought that when watching English movies. The English don't spend hours in make-up trying to remove all the little blemishes and flaws that real people have.  Hollywood still has the idea that heroes and heroines must be one step removed from gods and goddesses.  In appearance, anyway.

 Don't you think that every book with a decent story line and dialogue has a chance at being made into a movie?  There is such a demand for films, and original scripts couldn't begin to fill it.  I suspect every new author's dream is to get a movie contract for his book, and make his fortune.  And every established author hopes fervently that the producers don't ruin his/her book!
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2009, 11:59:43 AM »
Tomereader, I think a lot of folks here are being encouraged by the movie to at least take a look at Marquez’s book.  I didn’t like 100 Years of Solitude,  so tend to shy away.  But like Eloise, I’ll probably see the movie before I try the book.  You might put your give away offer over in Book Club Online as Love .  .  .  is one of the books being voted on this week for our February discussion.

Quote
I try not to compare a movie with the book. I try to take it as two separate things.
  from jeriron

That’s a good way to do it if you can, jeriron.  My f2f mystery group read and watched The Good German, set in Berlin right after WWII.  There were several changes made in the film, but the two items actually enhanced each other.  The book provided background on the characters and the newsreel clips in the film gave the reader a better perspective on Berlin at that time. 

But then there are all those films that make you wonder how movie-goers would know what was going on if they hadn't read the book. 

Babi, gods and goddesses – those scraggly young men with 5 days facial hair growth?   :P

Quote
And every established author hopes fervently that the producers don't ruin his/her book!
  from Babi.

Remember the first Elizabeth George novel  shown on PBS several years ago.  It was said at the time that she was very picky about how it was done, which was why none of her works had previously been made into films.  That first one was pretty true, as I recall, but look what’s happened since.  Did she get bought out?

Tomereader1

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2009, 06:24:09 PM »
[
Babi, gods and goddesses – those scraggly young men with 5 days facial hair growth?   :P
[[/quote] Anyone would think the razor and comb businesses had gone down the tubes.  I mean, no guys comb their hair anymore!  And the facial hair, ugh.  A beard is nice when well trimmed, but this grunge look is awful.  I just imagine that these guys stink to high heaven!
The reading of a fine book is an uninterrupted dialogue in which the book speaks and our soul replies.


André Maurois

Babi

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2009, 09:15:41 AM »
And how about that popular new women's hairdo---you know, the one that looks like an old straw broom?  I haven't noticed many scraggly young men with five days of beard;  probably not watching those movies. But I still think we would be astounded to see some 'before and after' pictures of actresses getting the Hollywood make-up and redesign treatment.

  Maybe Elizabeth George signed a new contract after the first book was treated properly.  Or maybe so many people complained about Barbara Haver's appearance that she agreed to the 'improvements'.  Even non-beauties can make the best of what they've got.  It's the false ideas equating beauty with a perceived 'perfection' that annoys me and discourages whole generations of young women growing up.

"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Mippy

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2009, 12:00:20 PM »
Hi, everyone.   I'll try to post here later!
quot libros, quam breve tempus

joyous

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2009, 03:11:24 PM »

I had placed Love in the Time of Cholera in my queue and was just notified that it is in the mail.  Didn't read the book.
JOY

maryz

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #20 on: January 08, 2009, 08:50:15 PM »
Checking in.  And, Hats, it's good to see that you found this new site!!
"When someone you love dies, you never quite get over it.  You just learn how to go on without them. But always keep them safely tucked in your heart."

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2009, 09:34:52 AM »
Quote
And how about that popular new women's hairdo

Makes me think  -- “and she paid to do that!”

Mippy, Joy, and MaryZ, glad you found your way here.  Lots of neat stuff coming up around us.  Has anyone seen the Benjamin Britten film?  I understand that’s from an F. Scott Fitzgerald story.

And Joy, I’m glad for your uptick about Love .. .. Cholera.  I didn’t know it was already out on DVD.  There’s been so much talk about it lately I just assumed it was a new film.  Javiar Bardem – wasn’t he nominated for some award last year?  Anyway, it’s going on my queue.

Mippy

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2009, 10:41:32 AM »
My most recent DVD rental was The Madness of King George.  It's based on a play, not a novel, does that count?  Anyway, it's terrific!

Marley and Me  is already in my rental queue, waiting to be released on DVD.   My hubby hates to go out to movies (don't ask) so I'll have to wait a while to see it.
 I don't care what the reviews say about the movie, I loved the book, gave it to relatives for gifts, and think John Grogan is a terrific writer!
quot libros, quam breve tempus

Aberlaine

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #23 on: January 09, 2009, 04:58:27 PM »
My f2f book group just finished discussing The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society.  We ended up by asking each other if this book would be a good movie.  We all agreed it would.  Then we tried to choose the stars who would best play the characters.  No consensus there!

Nancy

Babi

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2009, 09:31:23 AM »
I now have the "Guernsey Literary etc.,..."  from my library, along with about four other books, so I'm not sure when I'll start reading it.  I will, however, take notes so that if it is chosen for discussion, I'll be ready!  I'll see who comes to my mind as potential stars for that one.  One difficulty, however, is that I'm much more familiary with the older stars than the newer ones.  I wonder why that is?  ::)
 
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2009, 12:54:27 PM »
Welcome Nancy.  I’m kind of like Babi, I only know the older stars .  So who would be a good Dawsey (I can’t remember the names.)  For Sydney – he’s the best friend’s brother?  How about Philip Seymour Hirsch?  And I want Tyne Daly (she is still alive, isn’t she) for that very blunt, big-hearted woman who meddles.

Well Mippy, it is very nice to be able to put your feet up, stretch out, and/or take a break during the movie.  That’s my main way of viewing because I don’t catch the dialog well enough in the theatre, and nothing here is captioned or subtitled.  The last foreign flick to play in my town was Pan’s Labyrinth.  But I do love a big screen every onece in a while, soI try to take advantage of visits to my New York daughter.  On my last visit I saw Tell No One, which is a recent French film, based on the book by Harlan Coban.  A good thriller for a movie.  I haven’t read the book.

Aberlaine

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2009, 01:06:18 PM »
I love Sean Connery and if I were the director, I'd find a spot for him in the Guernsey film!   ~ Nancy

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #27 on: January 12, 2009, 10:36:37 AM »
Last night was a big night at the Golden Globes, especially for the film Slumdog Millionaire.  I had heard that it was from a book, but did not know any more, so did a little research, and here is one link:   Slumdog Millionaire


Q and A, on which the film is based, is Vikas Swarup’s first novel.  His second novel, Six Suspects, was released this summer and has been optioned for a film (whatever that means.)

Are there any Elmore Leonard fans out there?  I had never read an Elmore Leonard until a few years ago because I always remembered the comments of an elderly gentleman from my church.  I would run into him periodically in the mystery section of the public library and we would chat about various mystery writers.  He was a great Elmore Leonard fan.  “But,” he said, “I would never want Dorothy (his wife) to read him,”  which, in my naïve younger years interpreted that his books were a little hard core.

But a few years back a film company came to Cape Girardeau to shoot scenes from Leonard’s Killshot.  With that, my f2f group read the book, and it was not bad.  The author had even researched well Mississippi River barge companies, which played a part in the book.  The film has been an up and down thing and the scenes shot in my town are now said to be almost non-existent. But it is being released Jan 23 in a few select cities – not here, as we are not select enough.  If you should see it,  don’t look for me, as I did not go downtown that day.

pike99

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2009, 09:47:29 PM »
Turner Classic Movies (TCM on cable)always shows a lot of older films that were made from books. Remember,back in the "old days" lots of classics were turned into films. One of the best adaptations was "From Here to Eternity".. You can go to TCM's web site and check the schedule. I always liked Picture of Dorian Gray. I still think Gone With The Wind is a classic. When you think of how these films were made without computer generated images ,you can really appreciate the artistry that went into film making.
   Does anyone think that seeing a movie of a book first ,is an impetus to reading the book? As an aside, I can remember reading Classic Comics and then being so interested that I would read the book.

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2009, 09:02:14 AM »
 Hi Pike, welcome, glad you found us.  Are you from Seattle?  I’m asking because of your name – Pike’s place market and highway99 (Aurora)

Quote
Does anyone think that seeing a movie of a book first ,is an impetus to reading the book? As an aside, I can remember reading Classic Comics and then being so interested that I would read the book.
  (from pike99)

If it was a really good movie, yes, because I’d want to know more, especially background material that the screenwriters couldn’t include.  The so-so movies, not so tempted.  And that’s how I’m feeling right now about Plain Truth, the film and book about the Amish family.  I have Jodi Picoult’s book on my bookshelf, and the movie was okay, but not outstanding.  And who wrote We Were the Mulvenys – I saw that film a long time ago, and have had the book for years, but so far not tempted to read it.

On the other hand, has a bad book ever turned into a good movie?  I hated Bee Season, tried the movie and found it just as bad.

Now Nancy, just where are you going to put Sean Connery?  I can't believe I've forgotten their names already -- but, the grandpa, maybe?


Babi

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #30 on: January 14, 2009, 09:49:14 AM »
Most of our old favorite actors and actresses would have to play the older roles now, wouldn't they?  There are a number of newer generation actors that I like, too, of course.  I just don't recognize all of them by name.  (That's my fault, not theirs!)
   I saw an old re-run of Northern Exposure recently,  and was startled to realize that the good-looking young doctor was now the FBI brother on 'Numbers'.  And I had to laugh when I learned that the cynical genius doctor of "House" was also the none-too-bright Bertie Wooster of "Wooster and Jeeves".
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Aberlaine

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #31 on: January 15, 2009, 11:28:18 AM »
I'd love to put Sean Connery in the character of Dawsey Adams, the love interest in the story.  But I think he's too old for the character.  He's charming and honest and quaint, just like Dawsey Adams.

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #32 on: January 15, 2009, 06:35:14 PM »
Over in Read Around the World, MarjV was telling about a movie she received from Netflix, The Stone Angel, based on the novel by deceased Canadian author, Margaret Laurence.

"In ninety-year-old Hagar Shipley, the restless, crotchety, and proud protagonist, Laurence creates a memorable character who reveals what it is like to be very old, physically frail, dependent on others, and tormented by memories of the past. Laurence also movingly depicts the sudden dawning of realization in Hagar's mind of where she has gone wrong in life, and what has been the cause of her unhappiness. "

This is new to me.  Has anyone seen it, or read Laurence’s book with the same title?

"The Stone Angel is also a realistic portrayal of life in the prairie towns of western Canada from the late nineteenth century to the Depression of the 1930s and beyond"

hats

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #33 on: January 17, 2009, 08:33:23 AM »
Joyce Carol Oates wrote "We Were The Mulvanneys." I haven't seen the movie. I loved the book. It's about a whole family dealing with one terrible, terrible incident that happens to one of them.

hats

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #34 on: January 17, 2009, 08:43:08 AM »
Hi Babi,

The same here-

bellemere

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2009, 04:49:11 PM »
I didn/t see the Broadway play "Doubt" but I found the movie riveting!  the tension between the nun and the priest was crackling!  I can just imagine how, on a live stage, it would be even more so.  but the fact that the playwright, John Patrick Shanley, also did the screenplay was a big plus.  Even the artistic direction supported the theme of doubt,' the wind as a metaphor for rumor,; the opening and closing of windows and doors; the stuffy atmosphere of the old scholl and convent!  Loved it!   if he ever has another play on Broadway, I will find a way to get there, for sure.
Did anyone see both?

pedln

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #36 on: January 19, 2009, 05:48:28 PM »
That's interesting, Bellemere, that both play and screenplay were written by the playwright.  And I find now that he also directed the film.  An article in Wikipedia states that it's in his contract that not a word of his screenplay can be changed.  (Would that there be more examples of that.)  At any rate, I'm glad you liked it and I look forward to seeing the movie when it comes out on DVD.

He asked his first grade teacher, Sister Peggy, to be the film's technical consultant, as he had no idea how nuns behaved in the convent.

PatH

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #37 on: January 19, 2009, 09:47:20 PM »
He asked his first grade teacher, Sister Peggy, to be the film's technical consultant, as he had no idea how nuns behaved in the convent.

I love that.

Frybabe

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #38 on: January 20, 2009, 09:41:08 PM »
John Mortimer very recently passed away. You may remember him for Rumpole of the Bailey.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-mortimer19-2009jan19,0,3493093.story

Babi

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Re: Movies & Books Into Movies
« Reply #39 on: January 21, 2009, 09:33:34 AM »
I've seem some previews of  "Doubt", and had already decided I want to see the film. I'll have to wait until it's available at Netflix, tho'.

  I'm sorry to hear of John Mortimer's passing, tho' not surprised.  I understood his health was poor.  I did so much enjoy his portrayal of Rumpole.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs