Author Topic: The Library  (Read 1129457 times)

PatH

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18680 on: January 18, 2018, 03:03:16 PM »


The Library
Our library cafe is open 24/7; the welcome mat is always out.
Do come in from daily chores and spend some time with us.



bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18681 on: January 18, 2018, 03:32:36 PM »
Here is a little video I put together of God's little creatures great & small, in my little backyard sanctuary.  They love my Rose of Sharon bush for protection.  I plan to put together a book and have it in hardcover for my own personal enjoyment.  I may work on it this year.  Who knows, I get to distracted with other things, and I still need to finish my two grandchildren's baby books I began and never finished.  Oh dear, so much to do, so little time it seems.

Again....  You do NOT have to have Facebook to click the link to watch this video.  It is the host site I use personally for posting my pics and videos from.

https://www.facebook.com/marie.patterfritzreinhart/videos/10215575723849571/
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

Dana

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18682 on: January 18, 2018, 03:32:50 PM »
I have a VHS copy of Me and the Colonel..1958 movie, but it's in UK format.  Saw it as a kid, too.  Don't think my dad liked Curt Jurgens playing a Pole! (he was Polish).

BarbStAubrey

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18683 on: January 18, 2018, 03:42:25 PM »
Ah yes, I remember The Song of Bernadette - playing the part of Bernadette marked Jennifer Jones so that the audiences expected her to only play good girl and noble parts, which she pretty much did - I remember my parents taking us and then the church reserved the entire movie theater for the entire school to attend one afternoon along with the nuns and a few parents who were mostly moms who cleaned up and decorated the alter - we all walked up to the movie house, by class two by two - of course no talking till we got into our seats and then we had to be quiet - but it was expected and these expectations gave us a feeling of security. Seeing the movie was the first realization there would be all the bloody bandages and diseased garbage from a hospital in a dump. I guess sometime, along the way of 'progress' all that goes into an incinerator.

If I remember there was supposed to be a message from the Virgin Mary told to us 50 years later - heard briefly the message was opened or maybe, one of the three was still alive but I have no recollection what was in the message. Does anyone remember all that.

I am so tired of being cold - battening down the house means drawing drapes and anything to block the cold plus the shorter days I am growing weary of gray skies and lights on in the house all day - talk about cabin fever - I sure have it and I am eating all the wrong food so my disposition is going down - not even a hot cup of coffee helps. Hope the roads are ice free tomorrow - like it or not I have to get out and drive up to Georgetown, about 40 minutes north of Austin...   

I could go a Brontë as long as it is NOT Jane Eyre or Wuthering Heights - been done to death and cranky today or not - please not again.

MaryZ thanks for that tip - I like it - tie a loose knot and then go back and untie and weave it in - last few, what I was doing was for one row alternating every other stitch with the new color which gave a battlement or pinked look to blocks of color changes. I thought a book on stranded knitting would be helpful but no information on starting new colors, only how to carry them along.

Another book suggestion Pat - my sister thoroughly enjoyed A Gentleman in Moscow - it was a top seller so I would think libraries would have it and the initial rush to read it seems to have died down - has anyone looked into it and what did you think? Since he is in his apartment for years my thinking is it will have the same affect as reading about someone's interior life - evidently there is humor and intrigue woven into the story.

Another I thought fascinating that was popular a year or so ago - Threads of Silk by Amanda Roberts - not sure if libraries still have it or not, but Amazon's write up sounds great - and it is on Kindle for 3.99

"When I was a child, I thought my destiny was to live and die on the banks of the Xiangjiang River as my family had done for generations. I never imagined that my life would lead me to the Forbidden City and the court of China’s last Empress.

Born in the middle of nowhere, Yaqian, a little embroidery girl from Hunan Province, finds her way to the imperial court, a place of intrigue, desire, and treachery. From the bed of an Emperor, the heart of a Prince, and the right side of an Empress, Yaqian weaves her way through the most turbulent decades of China’s history and witnesses the fall of the Qing Dynasty.

Fans of Amy Tan, Lisa See, Anchee Min, and Pearl S. Buck are sure to love this debut novel by Amanda Roberts. This richly descriptive and painstakingly researched novel brings the opulence of the Qing Court to life as Yaqian and Empress Cixi's lives intertwine over six decades."

And one more that my neighbor is championing - The House by the River by Lena Manta - about five young women who with all their life experiences realize their only constant is home. The mother lives in this house near Mount Olympus, that is their home, their safety, their touchstone filled with a mother's love. I do not think we have ever read a book that centers in modern Greece. I can see lots of connections already that Greece is the symbolic mother's home for the western world.

The love of bird watching Pat and Bellamarie, reminds me of the Book we read here that I loved and want to read again for myself - For Love of Lakes - and then another, of birds faring through this cold reminds me of an old Kentucky favorite that most school kids read in the seventh grade - I wonder if they still read it - A Kentucky Cardinal by James Lane Allen, a nineteenth century and early twentieth century Kentucky author that schools were named in his memory. There is a chapter all about how the Cardinal survives during a bitter snow storm. Been years since I read it but was classroom reading for my two older children - we moved here when my youngest was in second grade and so his school reading experience was instead, more about Stephen F. Austin or Jim Bowie, with schools bearing their name.

Think I'll switch to tea - a nice pot of tea - see if that does anything to lift the gloom in this house... yes, and new music - I think I have some Strauss - or maybe my DVD of Garu - he brings a party with his music. A glass of wine would probably go better with his music but tea it is...

BarbStAubrey

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18684 on: January 18, 2018, 04:09:28 PM »
Tra la - here is the link to the movie Me and the Colonel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmBsPmRaddc

And yes, I agree, Curt does not make a good Pole does he... not elegant enough...

And here is Song of Bernadette - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwHz6mRPZio


PatH

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18685 on: January 18, 2018, 04:59:19 PM »
Barb, Karen wanted to do A Gentleman in Moscow when it was new, and we were all enthusiastic, but the waiting lines for it were months long.  I see there are still waiting lines in my library system, though it's now out in paperback.

Thanks for the utube links.  Danny Kaye fan that I am, I really liked that movie.


bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18686 on: January 18, 2018, 10:28:40 PM »
PatH.,  I think at this point we are going to have to just choose a book and let the members either borrow, download, or purchase it if they are interested in the discussion.  It appears each book you have been checking on is having some kind of availability issue.  Frybabe provided us a link for one of the Bronte books:

Ann Bronte's The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (originally published under her pen-name, Acton Bell): http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/969

Thanks Barb for the links.
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

Mkaren557

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18687 on: January 19, 2018, 08:07:37 AM »
As you know, I loved A Gentleman in Moscow when I read it many months ago and volunteered to lead the discussion.  I am still available to lead the discussion if you want.  I love what Bellamarie said about book selection.  If we use library availability as a criteria for book selection, it will eliminate a lot of contemporary literature.  I loved Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre but we have read a lot of 19 th century lit. 

bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18688 on: January 19, 2018, 10:15:25 AM »
If A Gentleman in Moscow is half of the reviews it certainly would be worth a discussion!

https://www.amazon.com/Gentleman-Moscow-Towles/dp/1786330385/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1516373734&sr=1-1&keywords=a+gentleman+in+moscow

Brimming with humor, a glittering cast of characters, and one beautifully rendered scene after another, this singular novel casts a spell as it relates the count’s endeavor to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to be a man of purpose.

“And the intrigue! . . . [A Gentleman in Moscow] is laced with sparkling threads (they will tie up) and tokens (they will matter): special keys,
secret compartments, gold coins, vials of coveted liquid, old-fashioned pistols, duels and scars, hidden assignations (discreet and smoky), stolen passports, a ruby necklace, mysterious letters on elegant hotel stationery . . . a luscious stage set, backdrop for a downright Casablanca-like drama.” —The San Francisco Chronicle
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

BarbStAubrey

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18689 on: January 19, 2018, 10:27:24 AM »
quicky - full day - I guess the thing to do is see who those are who are depending on the Library - we sure want to be as inclusive as possible - Since this is Pat's call what about Karen, would you consider doing Gentleman... for our next read? That wouid be perfect to line up so that we all have the security of what is next - at this point I think it is Pat's call who asked for recommendations which prompted all our suggestions - Maybe Karen you and Pat can talk, she may be up for swapping time or the two of you work together or you follow her, the advantage of following is a bit more time for lines to be less long borrowing the book at the library - and yes, I am so with you about passing up on the Bronte's at this time - although nineteenth century lit is not off the radar it is just their stories are filled with so much angst.  Really must run...

bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18690 on: January 19, 2018, 10:47:35 AM »
So these are the books members have suggested the past week or so, I think it's a good list to begin from.  If anyone has any other titles they would like to submit feel free. 


The Song of Bernadette
Silent Sky
The Woman Who Broke the Code
Bronte ( excluding Wurthering Heights or Jane Eyre) The Tenant of Wildfell Hall is available online.
A Gentleman in Moscow
Threads of Silk

As much as I prefer being able to borrow our books from the library I am finding it difficult to get the 19th Century books.  In my town I have access to at least ten public libraries, not to mention a few in my neighboring towns, and yet, when I go to find many of our choices that are 18th or 19th century there are none.  I have resorted to Amazon, Good Reads or Abe Books to purchase for very little, most of the time less than ten dollars and that includes shipping.  I just purchased the Bronte book of four titles in one book for a grand total of $5.13.  It is used and in perfect condition.  So, I think in all reality, as Mkaren and Barb stated, 

MKaren,
Quote
If we use library availability as a criteria for book selection, it will eliminate a lot of contemporary literature.

Barb
Quote
see who those are who are depending on the Library - we sure want to be as inclusive as possible

As much as I love 18th and 19th century, I would also love to discuss more present books.  I, like many of you are on a retired income, so I personally don't spend a lot on books. Reading is something I truly enjoy, so I am willing to purchase books at reasonable prices, because mostly I borrow from my library or grab a brown bag of books for a dollar each Spring when they have their annual book sale at the local library.

We have to keep in mind in selecting titles if we are purchasing online, we have to allow for time to be shipped.

I agree, how about PatH., and MKaren talk it over and come to a decision.  I am up for anything!



“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

Dana

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18691 on: January 19, 2018, 11:47:55 AM »
Thanks for the link to Me and the Colonel. 

Frybabe

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18692 on: January 19, 2018, 12:03:48 PM »
Bellamarie, you forgot Angle of Repose. It is available at my library. I also borrowed it in the ebook form from the Free Library of Philadelphia (open only for PA readers to join). I am now reading the read deal from which the author very heavily borrowed for his novel.

CallieinOK

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18693 on: January 19, 2018, 01:22:09 PM »
I realize  "A Gentleman In Moscow" may not be chosen for the discussion.  However, I want to read it so did a search of my library catalog for the e-book.  They have 6 copies and I put it on Hold -  but I'm #54 on the waiting list.
Had to giggle a bit when I saw an additional title on the list... A Gentleman In Moscow - a Summary for Busy Readers.  My library doesn't have it. Reminded me of those summaries for various college courses that some used in lieu of actually reading the text book (can't remember what they were called).



bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18694 on: January 19, 2018, 03:20:30 PM »
Thanks Frybabe for adding Angle of Repose, I was trying to find as many as I could.  Everyone please feel free to submit others, these are not final, just a list we need to compose to hopefully choose from.
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

Jonathan

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18695 on: January 19, 2018, 06:28:32 PM »
All this enthusiasm is infectious. Thanks, Bellamarie, for the information on A Gentleman in Moscow. It sounds exciting. I'm in.

I'm almost through the Tina Brown book. She made such a roaring success of Vanity Fair in the 80's, as the editor. Always looking for good writers. And such a
brilliant storyteller herself. Having her baby is the best entry in her diary. Beautifully told. I found myself wondering what she would have done with the happenings at Lourdes. Whom would she have sent to write it up. Perhaps Ryszard Kapuscinski, the brilliant author and journalist. She would dearly like him to write something for Vanity Fair. You will all remember reading and talking about his book?Travels with
Herodotus.
Subsequently I found a biography of RK. A fantastic book of a life of adventurous reporting. I'm not sure why I had Gentleman in Moscow remind me of the book.

I would dearly like to help the ladies of the knitting club. Could I lend a shoulder? Playing the heel would do nothing for my reputation.

Mkaren557

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18696 on: January 20, 2018, 09:14:09 AM »
Good Morning, Everyone. Our winter discussion will be A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles, published in 2016.  I bought this book when it first came out and knew nothing about it.  Within a few pages I was hooked.  We have wanted to read this book but for a long time, but it was only available in hardcover and Kindle; now it is in paperback as well.  There will be more information coming soon.  Just let us know in the library if you are interested.  I have the names of several of you now and there is room for everyone who wants a special read.

I am tenatively thinking we will start February 7 with a short pre-discussion and begin for real on February 12.  So you will probably want to acquire your book and start reading.

Mkaren557

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18697 on: January 20, 2018, 09:55:14 AM »
By the way, I encourage you to go online to check out the books but beware of those that give away too much of the story.  And you may want to watch "Casablanca" if you have access to it.  You can find full versions on You Tube.  If I remember I will put up the website.

ginny

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18698 on: January 20, 2018, 09:59:15 AM »
Oh, super, well done, all! The reviews are stunning:

"The book is like a salve. I think the world feels disordered right now. The count’s refinement and genteel nature are exactly what we’re longing for.” —Ann Patchett

Callie I can lend you my copy if you need one?  The 15 classes and the National Latin Exam are taking every minute of my time now. Email me if you'd like it.


CallieinOK

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18699 on: January 20, 2018, 10:06:49 AM »
Ginny,  oh, thank you so much for the offer to share your copy of "A Gentleman In Moscow".   The library has 9 copies of the e-book and I haven't checked to see what the situation would be for the hard copy.  There are plenty of sources through which I can get one so I'll take my chances.

PatH

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18700 on: January 20, 2018, 11:03:16 AM »
My book has been ordered, will come soon.

bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18701 on: January 20, 2018, 11:36:20 AM »
GREAT!!!   So glad we have decided on a book for February!!   I'm in.

I just began A Gift of Hope: Helping the Homeless by Danielle Steele.  Just a couple of chapters in and I am already hooked. 
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

BarbStAubrey

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18702 on: January 20, 2018, 12:28:14 PM »
Tra La - ordered mine from Amazon and it will be delivered January 29...

Ah ha February 12 is Lundi Gras this year and February 12, was my mother's birthday, memories; I always had a florist deliver her favorite, yellow daffodils and purple Iris.

With our discussion starting on Lundi Gras I will have dusted off and be playing all my Dr. John and Allen Toussaint Cds as background all day.

With so many who stayed here in Austin after fleeing Katrina there are many small restaurants and other businesses along with several musicians sharing their heritage and so I expect we will be seeing lots of Purple and Silver and Purple and gold all over town on Lundi Gras, and Fat Tuesday when 6th street has a fun night of parade, impromptu music in the streets and huge numbers of folks in the most wonderful costumes.

It sure will seem a little less elegant seeing folks celebrating the next day which is also Valentines Day with ashes on their forehead - a busy busy week.

What a party week to kick off our reading A Gentleman from Moscow - I've a big smile going just thinking about it...

Frybabe

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18703 on: January 20, 2018, 01:25:29 PM »
My library has several copies of both print and ebook. There are 20 and 26 holds respectively. Don't think any of them will clear soon. Will check again at the beginning of Feb.

mabel1015j

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18704 on: January 20, 2018, 02:36:38 PM »
Never heard the term Lundi Gras, but I do enjoy Dr John and Allen Toussaint. Seems a perfect opportunity to listen to them.
There are six copies of A Gentleman in Moscow at my library. I’ll wait a week to request so I have it during Feb and our discussion.

Jean

bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18705 on: January 20, 2018, 03:25:51 PM »
I can pick my copy up from my library on Monday!  I'm getting it now, since I can always renew it.

Yep, Ash Wednesday is Valentine's Day and Easter is April Fool's Day! 
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

Frybabe

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18706 on: January 21, 2018, 04:51:21 AM »
What strange and wonderful things one can find in Project Gutenberg's library. Here is a 1923 reprint of The Little London Directory of 1677 with introduction.  http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56391 The list does not, in many cases, include what the merchant sold, but you can guess some of those by where they are located. The introduction adds info about some of those listed and some of the places of business.

jane

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18707 on: January 21, 2018, 10:24:42 AM »
I, too, had never heard the term "lundi gras," and apparently it's a New Orleans thing


Lundi Gras - Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lundi_Gras
Lundi Gras is a relatively recently popularized name for a series of Shrove Monday events taking place during the New Orleans Mardi Gras. It includes the tradition of Rex, king of the New Orleans carnival, arriving by boat.

PatH

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18708 on: January 21, 2018, 07:12:55 PM »
Frybabe, you are the master of finding weird, interesting things on Project Gutenberg.  Who would have thought my breakfast reading would be the introduction to a 1677 London merchants address book.  Fascinating.  Then I had fun looking for relatives.  One of my ancestors was from a family of wool merchants and clothiers, mostly based east of London.  There are several people with the right last name (Morse) and first names common among my Morses, but no mention of trade.  They aren't my ancestors anyway though, since mine were already here in 1677.

PatH

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18709 on: January 21, 2018, 07:20:34 PM »
I got my copy of A Gentleman in Moscow today, so I'm ready to go.

bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18710 on: January 22, 2018, 10:16:13 AM »
It would be so exciting for me to be able to find my ancestors from Italy, but when my grandparents came over, our last name was misspelled which is far from how we spell it now.  Petrofritzi vs Patterfritz is not even close.  We have no living relatives who can help us, those who are living can not confirm anything because one says so and so told them one spelling and place of birth of our grandparents, while another says differently. 
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

PatH

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18711 on: January 22, 2018, 12:33:46 PM »
Me too, Bellamarie, I know the names of my Italian grandparents, and that they came from Abruzzi, and that's it.  Can't find a record of them landing in New York, which probably means the name was misspelled in the records, though it's correct among the family.

Whereas on my mother's side, I know five different lines back to the early 1600s.  That mix is typical of our wonderful country.

Jonathan

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18712 on: January 22, 2018, 09:08:27 PM »
One hears of genealogists who will find anscestors you never dreamed of, if you provide them with a DNA sample. The Italian pool is especially rich. Lucky you.

I picked up A Gentleman in Moscow today. It looks fascinating. It should be fun.

bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18713 on: January 22, 2018, 09:19:03 PM »
Okay just got my two books from the library today.  Silent Sky by Lauren Gunderson  is a very small book of 60 pages, in the actual play format.  I read it in about an hour.  It was interesting, about how Henrietta Leavitt discovered the standard measure to calculate distances in the galaxy, which showed we are one of many, possibly billions of galaxies.  Obviously, since it is such a short book, it would not be up for a discussion.
  PatH., you would like this if you have not already read about her discovery.

I have A Gentleman in Moscow also.

Jonathan, we were posting at the same time.  I have often thought about doing one of the DNA tests to get some answers.  Like Pat said, I too could probably trace my mother's side back quite a bit since they were from the south and an easy name, Taylor and Garrett.
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18714 on: January 23, 2018, 09:46:08 AM »
I found this book on Amazon.com about Henrietta Swan Leavitt, that could be a good discussion book in the future. 
PatH., I know it's something you would love to read and lead.  After I finished reading the play book, I wanted more so I am going to purchase this for only $6.00 including shipping.

Miss Leavitt's Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe (Great Discoveries)
by George Johnson
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

BarbStAubrey

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18715 on: January 23, 2018, 11:34:37 AM »
OH my Bellamarie I looked up Silent Sky by Lauren Gunderson on Amazon and do you know to buy new the price is over $45 and resale over $52 - whew - Your library has quite a treat available that you were able to read - however, the Miss Leavitt's Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe in paperback is an affordable treat  :) priced at only $8.68 new - and yes, I agree, the story sounds like just the kind of book Pat would enjoy.

My Gentleman... does not arrive till next Monday - I did agree to a delayed shipment which Amazon refunds $5 for every item they offer a delayed shipment - I had earned $10 credit from earlier delayed shipments and used it towards buying Gentleman... and then will receive another $5 for agreeing to delay that shipment - what is that web site, something Penny Pincher or something - I should share my tip on how to save money by using Amazon delayed shipments.  :D

Sunshine yesterday and today - thank goodness - the steady gloom was getting me down - however, shock, the Spring leaf drop has started - with all this cold thought if anything it would be delayed but instead it is starting early, both my driveway and the patio are already filled with leaves. The Live Oak lose their leaves in early spring... I think nature is all mixed up this year because yesterday I had 9 does in the backyard and their coat was very dark which is typical when there is cold weather coming. We do have all of February before we are out of the woods.

Watched wonderful movie from Amazon last evening - Quartet - a retirement home for professional musicians with an incredible line up of actors, Maggie Smith, Tom Courtenay, Billy Connolly, Michael Gambon, Dame Gwenyth Jones, it is like the whose-who of retired British theater and the world of Opera - The movie include some of the real life retirees from the professional world of music - it is a delight with a nice message about living to the fullest our life after a certain age and what is really important.

bellamarie

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18716 on: January 23, 2018, 11:49:13 AM »
Barb
Quote
Miss Leavitt's Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe in paperback is an affordable treat  :) priced at only $8.68 new

Check out these prices at this site:    https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/miss-leavitts-stars-george-johnson/1100871863?ean=9780393328561
Click "marketplace" and look at the used book prices starting at $2.39.

Yes, please share your tip on the savings to delay shipments.  I have another Barnes and Noble discount to use from yet another lawsuit that was settled to members I can use before April.  I have begun watching Victoria on PBS, which is very interesting.  Egads, never realized she had nine children!  I loved watching The Crown and Downton Abbey.
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden

Frybabe

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18717 on: January 24, 2018, 05:09:11 AM »
I woke up morning to news that Ursula la Guin, one of the contemporary greats in speculative/science fiction writing, died yesterday. She will live on in her writings and in all those who were influenced by her writing, both authors and readers.

Frybabe

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18718 on: January 24, 2018, 07:29:38 AM »
Checking the online library, I discovered that Ursula le Guin wrote a book based on Lavinia who was to be Aeneas' bride in the Aeneid. Has anyone read it? It seems a little out of le Guin's usual fare. I have it on hold.

Just downloaded Hav, a novel by Jan Morris who I know mostly as a travel writer and first learned of her from reading her biographical book, Conundrum. Hav is a fictional travel account to the city rumored to be at the site of Troy. I think this version might actually contain both Last Letters from Hav (Booker Prize shortlisted in 1985) and its sequel, Hav of the Myrmidons. The Free Library of Philadelphia describes it as "part erudite travel memoir, part speculative fiction, part cautionary political tale." The introduction is by Ursula le Guin.

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Re: The Library
« Reply #18719 on: January 24, 2018, 12:23:38 PM »
Frybabe I had to quick go and check - it was hard to believe that Ursula Le Guin had passed - it just says she died peacefully, no indication of cause or illness - Both you and Pat admired and read her work - almost ordered one of her books that is not a novel but then realized, I have many books written by writers about writing and the other topic, about living and each tome ends up being the same ol' - they seldom share anything new about aging as they write their thoughts after having achieved a certain amount of public success. And so for now I passed - however, Le Guin's contribution is prolific and that for now will by my memory. I guess this only adds to our experience that as we age so do all those who added riches to our life.

Another sunny day - still the hot air heat blows through the house but the sun makes such a difference - winter depression has always been a problem for me and so I keep only light reading next to me - saw a video on Facebook last evening about a young girl being held because she had her foot under her when sitting on the subway - oh dear - that sent me down the rabbit hole of all sorts of scenarios - talk about the dark mind of Edgar Allen Poe - sheesh

Which by the way did y'all see the PBS series on Edgar Allen Poe - nicely done - forgot he wrote the story of bricking in someone - Over and over we see stories of nineteenth century business men being so ruthless and underhanded as they showed again as Poe's experience of being hornswaggled - whew - and yet, we see this time in history as romantic -

Well tonight the Detectorists are bringing their light approach to life - love the show - Andy is so quirky looking he ends up looking cute and his relationship with Becky is sweet.

Just started The Second Mrs. Hockaday - starts with the typical wild child riding her horse miles to the pleasure of her father who laughs at her spunk - we've got her sister's wedding and the new soldier in town so we shall see - the blurb about this first novel says, "Taut, almost unbearable suspense . . . This galvanizing historical portrait of courage, determination, and abiding love mesmerizes and shocks."