Author Topic: PBS Programs Fall 2009  (Read 25357 times)

pedln

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #80 on: November 16, 2009, 07:47:01 PM »

Let's talk about current and upcoming PBS programs here.



CubFan -- thanks for saving me from being nagged.  That book was the one.  I could just see it -- green cover and all, but couldn't name it.

I watched part 1 of Collision last night and really enjoyed it.  I like these shows with lots of characters travelling down different paths, some maybe predictable -- like the mother-in-law. As for so many people with things to hide, well maybe the highways are just a microcasm of society.     >:(

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #81 on: November 17, 2009, 08:24:52 AM »
You don't go for that 'skeleton in every closet' notion, JOAN?
I suspect most policemen would say that everyone has something to hide, even if only because it's personal and private.
  I have the show on tape and plan to watch it this afternoon.  I'll see how it strikes me. So much depends on the quality of the actors.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

ALF43

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #82 on: November 17, 2009, 11:27:41 AM »
I watched Part 1 of Collision on Sunday.  I really enjoyed it and am looking forward to the conclusion next Sunday night.  I've teevoed it so I wn't miss it.  Fate is the protoganist.
Books are the bees which carry the quickening pollen from one to another mind.  ~James Russell Lowell

mrssherlock

  • Posts: 2007
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #83 on: November 17, 2009, 03:27:22 PM »
I am part way through watching it and it's fun to see familiar faces from BBCAmerica.  The  young black girl was on of the leads in "Being Human", a trio of housemates where one is a vampire, one a werewolf and she is a ghost.  The lead policeman was in "Pimeval", the professor who instigates the study of the anachronisms who begin to appear in London and environs.

  Leora Critchfield:  http://www.beinghumantv.com/page/Being+Human+Cast

  Douglas henshall:  http://www.tv.com/primeval/show/68346/cast.html
Jackie
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Edmund Burke

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #84 on: November 18, 2009, 08:47:31 AM »
I also watched part I of "Collision" and think they did an excellent job
of working in the different parties with the least confusion. I have to
agree with whoever said that the high percentage of people up to no good was unlikely.But what the hey...it's a mystery!
  I have "Primeval" on my Netflix queue. I'm looking forward to it; sounds like it would be intriguing.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Frybabe

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #85 on: November 18, 2009, 09:34:30 AM »
I started watching part 1 of Collision but it didn't hold my interest.

Just started reading Henning Mankell's The Pyramid. It is a book of five stories that you could call a prequel to the regular Wallander books exploring his early years. I took note in the preface that the Wallander series is only eight books. One following involves his daughter Linda who becomes a policewoman. All his others appear to be stand alones.

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #86 on: November 19, 2009, 11:50:52 AM »
I watched, "American Experience: Surviving the Dustbowl." This is really an informative series and done very well, with great historical footage and interviews with people who lived through the various events. One fact I didn't realize is that in 1935, I think, the black dust and great winds lasted 27 days and nights without stop. You couldn't see your  hand in front of your face. Many people thought it was the end of the world.

New farming methods were devised to protect the land but many farmers didn't want to change their ways. When they were offered a $1 an acre by the government to try different methods, some were finally persuaded.

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #87 on: November 19, 2009, 11:54:32 AM »
I watched part 1 of "Collision" and did find it interesting. Having the inspector in charge struggling emotionally (I'm assuming his wife and daughter were in an accident) while investigating the cases, helps to make a connection to the material. Lots going on with everyone!

Mrssherlock, I knew I recognized that beautiful actress from somewhere. Thanks for the reminder about "Being Human." I've seen a couple of episodes.

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #88 on: November 19, 2009, 11:58:50 AM »
BTW, I watched the last episode of "Lost in Austen." The ending is somewhat satisfying, in terms of what happens with Amanda and with Jane and Mr. Bingley, but it seemed to be rushed and left some loose ends (such as what happens with Michael, Amanda's boyfriend in the present?)

JoanK

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #89 on: November 19, 2009, 03:19:20 PM »
You are invited to a

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE  for Book and Food Lovers

December 1 - 20

Guests will be YOU and  authors of your favorite books that combine a good story with good tips on food.  Do drop in and tell us about your favorite foodies, real and otherwise, be it Rachel Ray or Kate Jacobs or Tyler Florence or Joanne Harris.  Who's your favorite cook?

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #90 on: November 20, 2009, 08:10:05 AM »
 That always leaves one vaguely dissatisfied, doesn't it, MARCIE? When
after watching a good show or reading a good story, the director or writer doesn't seem to quite know how to close out.  And of course on TV there are definite time constraints. Still, I find myself wishing a bit
more thought had gone into closure when that happens.
  I'm still hoping "Lost in Austen" will eventually be shown locally. I do
want to see it.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

Frybabe

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #91 on: November 20, 2009, 10:23:31 AM »
I agree Babi. There are more than a few books I've read that the endings seemed rushed, very weak, or left with a lot of loose ends - like the author got tired of writing the book and just wanted it done. Of course, if the book is going to be part of a series, then the loose ends can be addressed in the next book. Often they aren't. That seems to be why Henning Mankell wrote The Pyramid after his Wallander series was completed. He got a lot of email asking about Wallander's early life that were referenced in his books but never elaborated on, and the loose ends he left behind.

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #92 on: November 20, 2009, 03:06:24 PM »
Babi, "Lost in Austen" was enjoyable so I hope that you are able to see it.

Frybabe, that's interesting about "The Pyramid." I do plan on reading more of the Wallander series. I might wait until the PBS series continues early next year.

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #93 on: November 21, 2009, 08:37:46 AM »
 I've seen that frequently happen in a series, FRYBABE.  After writing several books, the author finds he/she must go back to the origins of his characters.  I always like that, so I assume other readers must, too.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

mrssherlock

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #94 on: November 21, 2009, 11:11:33 AM »
That's how we got the word "prequel".
Jackie
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Edmund Burke

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #95 on: November 22, 2009, 08:02:08 AM »
One of the many, many new words of our generation.  Heaven only
knows how many technology alone has spawned.   :o
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

mrssherlock

  • Posts: 2007
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #96 on: November 22, 2009, 10:13:26 AM »
Babi:  Is there any way your library could borrow books from other local systems?  My library is a member of a cosortium of 20 or so and many of my books come from them.  For other libraries there is a system for borrowing:  http://www.cityofsalem.net/Departments/Library/books/Pages/InterlibraryLoan.aspx
Jackie
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Edmund Burke

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #97 on: November 22, 2009, 09:28:28 PM »
Reminder: Part 2 of "Collision" is showing tonight in many areas. It's also available online or "on demand" on cable. Tomorrow, American Experience concludes its programs on the 1930s with "Seabiscuit", also available online or "on demand" on cable.

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #98 on: November 22, 2009, 09:35:41 PM »
The following program looks really good, especially if you're interested in the Arts and Crafts Movement. It will be showing on my PBS station on November 23. It's called "Elbert Hubbard: An American Original." From the program description:
"Today, the name Elbert Hubbard still incites passion among those who either love him or hate him, and the Roycroft Campus (the artisan community in East Aurora, New York) that he created still endures, inextricably tied to his character, his aspiration, and his passion. Roycroft is the legacy of a man who was, without a doubt, one of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century’s most eccentric, charismatic, and colorful characters."
See more at http://www.pbs.org/wned/elbert-hubbard/

joangrimes

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #99 on: November 23, 2009, 05:32:40 AM »
I watched Collision last night.  I enjoyed watching it just for its Englishness. By that I mean the scenery, accents, the English looks of the actors.  Those things are enough for me right now.

Joan Grimes
Roll Tide ~ Winners of  BCS 2010 National Championship

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #100 on: November 23, 2009, 08:48:26 AM »
Sounds interesting, MARCIE. Now if I can just remember to watch for it.
I think I have run across the name Hubbard before, watching 'Antique
Roadshow'.
  Taped 'Collision' last night and will be watching it sometime today. I've
been looking forward to it.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

mrssherlock

  • Posts: 2007
Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #101 on: November 23, 2009, 12:28:56 PM »
A while ago my son and i stumbled on a program about the Beatles and the Kremlin.  It was an outstanding example of unintended consequences that popular culture can have on government and history.  Besides it was good fun.  I love the Beatles' music and the lyrics to their songs are sheer poetry.  Funny how what seems like a passing fad can become an icon.  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1515155/
Jackie
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Edmund Burke

JoanK

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #102 on: November 23, 2009, 06:09:27 PM »
I enjoyed the end of Collision, too.

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #103 on: November 24, 2009, 01:19:57 AM »
I saw the end of Collision too. I'm not sure what to think of it.

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #104 on: November 24, 2009, 08:38:45 AM »
SPOILER ALERT FOR COLLISION

 I liked the irony of the wasp as a major factor in the collision.  And I
felt they did a reasonable job of wrapping up the loose ends.  The piano
player whose secret life was...horror!!...he was a Trekkie!  :D
  I was also very glad that the young waitress took her dream trip...
without the jerk Romeo.
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #105 on: November 24, 2009, 11:25:23 AM »
SPOILER ALERT FOR COLLISION

Babi, yes, I was happy for the waitress too. LOL, that the piano teacher was a Trekkie/Trekker!

ALF43

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #106 on: November 24, 2009, 11:35:37 AM »
The child in me has officially taken over.   ;D
I just had to read the spoiler alert!  eek, I had to do it.  I taped part two of Collision because we are traveling and I knew I wouldn't get a chance to see it here in new Mexico.  I'll let you know in a week (or so) how I liked the conclusion.
Books are the bees which carry the quickening pollen from one to another mind.  ~James Russell Lowell

pedln

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #107 on: November 24, 2009, 05:28:30 PM »
Andy, you peeked.  I taped it, too, or at least hope I did -- who knows what happens when the cat's away.  One blink of a power surge and everything gets cancelled.  I really liked the first part and hope the second part will live up to it.


salan

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #108 on: November 24, 2009, 05:48:05 PM »
Babi-I agree with you.  All-in-all it was a good program.  However, jumping back and forth in time sometimes frustrated me. 
Sally

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #109 on: November 25, 2009, 08:58:52 AM »
 Well, SALLY, I tell myself it's good exercise for my brain.  Of course,
it deepens a wrinkle or two, as well.   ;)
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

ALF43

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #110 on: November 25, 2009, 10:11:53 AM »
Babi, now there you have made my day. :o
My granddaughter counts my wrinkles.  I think it's funny but my daughter does not see the humor in it.  Perhaps she sees a futuristic  ::)her in it.
Books are the bees which carry the quickening pollen from one to another mind.  ~James Russell Lowell

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #111 on: November 26, 2009, 10:49:46 PM »
I saw the "American Experience" program on Seabiscuit on my cable On Demand. It was very interesting and exciting. I had forgotten which races Seabiscuit had won so I was on the edge of my seat watching some of them. He and his jockey, who both were disabled by accidents, really won the hearts of Americans.


marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #112 on: November 26, 2009, 11:09:38 PM »
On December 1 at 7:30 pm my PBS station will be showing "Science Trek," a program that explores the intersection of science fiction and science fact, combining clips from "Star Trek" and "Star Trek: The Next Generation" with interviews with scientists and researchers. PBS and Star Trek icon LeVar Burton hosts.

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #113 on: November 27, 2009, 09:22:56 AM »
ALF, I remember so well loving to stroke my grandmothers hands. They
were very wrinkled, but so soft. As for the wrinkles in my face, they all fall into laugh lines, so I don't mind them, either.
  That sounds like fun, MARCIE. I am a firm believer that whatever people
can imagine, they can someday accomplish. And there is a lot of science
fiction from the past to confirm that!
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

mrssherlock

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #114 on: November 27, 2009, 01:15:27 PM »
This isn't PBS but Discovery had a Mythbusters marathon including a series of demonstrations refuting the claim that the moon landing was performed in a movie studio.  These folks are wacky and have way too much fun blowing things up but they are meticulous in their efforts to recreate the myth they are testing.  An unintended consequence is that they are demonstrating scientific method as they recount the steps in their preparations and the actual tests.  SPOILER:  The demonstrated to my satisfaction that the points of controversy with the conspiracy theorists were consistent with an actual moon landing and now special effects in a movie studio.  If you haven't watched this show you are missing a good time.  The two principals are former movie stunt men and they delight in showing h ow movie special effects are tricks instead of repeatable events.  When they can refute the movie scen, the say the myth is busted.  http://dsc.discovery.com/fansites/mythbusters/mythbusters.html
Jackie
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Edmund Burke

JoanK

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #115 on: November 27, 2009, 09:36:14 PM »
I'm a huge fan of mythbusters, although I agree they are too hung up on explosions. Once you've seen one explosion, you've seen them all. And sometimes there is too much fake laughing. But they teach logic and scientific method. And some of their myth creations are pretty neat. I loved it when they built a lead balloon and got it to float. And when they escaped from Alcatraz in a boat made only of raincoats.

I did see the one yesterday where they split a car in two (engine block and all) with a snowplow shovel.

Babi

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #116 on: November 28, 2009, 10:37:14 AM »
 Split a car in two with a snow plow shovel?  This is entertainment? JOAN,  you've got to get out more.  ??? ;)
"I go to books and to nature as a bee goes to the flower, for a nectar that I can make into my own honey."  John Burroughs

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #117 on: November 28, 2009, 04:57:20 PM »
LOL, Babi and Joan  ;)

Frybabe

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #118 on: November 29, 2009, 01:50:13 AM »
It appears that my PBS Station is running a six part series called The Story of India with Michael Palin. It is in letterbox form and the sound was a bit odd, if you ask me, like there was some kind of reverberation or something. I wasn't in the mood for that tonight, but I may continue to watch it tomorrow. They did not show Lost in Austin here.

marcie

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Re: PBS Masterpiece Classic and Other PBS Programs
« Reply #119 on: November 29, 2009, 02:02:30 AM »
Frybabe, I'll check my PBS stations to see if that program is showing here. It looks like there is information about The Story of India at http://www.pbs.org/thestoryofindia/about/episode_summaries, with additional resources. There is an intriguing sentence on that site: "While moving at high speed into the 3rd millennium, India alone, of all the civilizations on the face of the earth, is still in touch with her ancient past." It also looks like there is a book that accompanies the series.