Author Topic: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2  (Read 465988 times)

mabel1015j

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6120 on: August 09, 2017, 09:11:19 PM »
         
This is the place to talk about the works of fiction you are reading, whether they are new or old, and share your own opinions and reviews with interested readers.

Every week the new bestseller lists come out brimming with enticing looking books and rave reviews. How to choose?


Discussion Leader:  Judy Laird






Thanks Barb and Pat. I don't know why I wouldn't have taken part in that discussion, but I'll look for it.

Hi Hats, good to hear from you.

Jean

hats

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6121 on: August 10, 2017, 03:01:09 AM »
Here is a happy hello to all of you Bookies. Sorry I haven't written each name down yet to make my hi more personal. All of you are good friends.

BarbStAubrey

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6122 on: August 10, 2017, 12:02:53 PM »
;) Us? Could this be us Hats?

Jonathan

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6123 on: August 10, 2017, 01:50:11 PM »
Please. Would someone identify these three lovely ladies.

PatH

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6124 on: August 10, 2017, 02:39:59 PM »
Just the question I was about to ask.  I have guesses for two, but no certainties.

BarbStAubrey

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6125 on: August 10, 2017, 03:26:47 PM »
Oh lordy - just a fun photo I found that could be any of us and with Hats saying, 'All of us are good friends' I thought it would be fun to upload a photo of friends - lots of photos on Google of groups of young friends but not so many of older folks as friends so I took what there was that showed smiling folks. And so, Pat and Jonathan y'all can have fun Baptizing them or holding a simchat bat ceremony and name our new photographed friends  ;)

hats

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6126 on: August 10, 2017, 10:45:08 PM »
Barb, I wish. It's a lovely photo. I should look so good.

Annie

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6127 on: August 11, 2017, 08:55:29 AM »
Hats, it's so nice to see you posting again.  Where have you been hiding?
"No distance of place or lapse of time can lessen the friendship of those who are thoroughly persuaded of each other's worth." Robert Southey

Jonathan

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6128 on: August 11, 2017, 11:49:32 AM »
That's wonderful. I was guessing, but now that I know, I will enjoy all your posts more than ever, and allow your wonderful, infectious smiles to make my day. Every day. What a pin up!!! The world is a beautiful place.

hats

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6129 on: August 15, 2017, 04:32:23 AM »
Hi Annie, I haven't been hiding. Sometimes I would love to hide. It's impossible in this new world. I'm becoming a child again in thought. ???  I just finished "Summer" by Edith Wharton.  It's very sad. I needed a tissue. Since I like a sad novel every once and again, I loved it. There is so much I didn't understand in it. Would love to have this group discuss it. Barb, where is your book of symbolism? It did put me in a Edith Wharton mood. Remembered the "House Of Mirth" discussion. Looked at her other titles. Wonderful.

BarbStAubrey

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6130 on: August 15, 2017, 10:57:21 AM »
Never read Summer by Wharton - most of her stories do involve women who get the short end of things because of the way women experienced life during that time in history -

Hats, For $2.99 + shipping Amazon has a used copy of
An Illustrated Encyclopaedia of Traditional Symbols by J. C. Cooper

When grandsons were seniors in High School they each received a copy - that and a copy of The Man Who Planted Trees.

mabel1015j

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6131 on: August 15, 2017, 01:20:55 PM »
Well, I went to the archive to read your discussion on "I Have Always Loved You". It answered my question as to why I didn't remember the discussion!?!?

I was traveling and my library was "traveling", (the library was being moved into a new bdg and was closed for about a month), so I didn't really participate, altho I intended to "hitch a ride" on your discussion at the time. So now that I'm reading the book I will enjoy your comments and many links to those wonderful paintings.

BarbStAubrey

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6132 on: August 15, 2017, 06:15:05 PM »
OK Hats - read the Wharton's book Summer today after reading your post - http://www.pagebypagebooks.com/Edith_Wharton/Summer/Chapter_I_p3.html

Lots of analogies - sad and yet, not so sad - she had a kind caretaker - I wonder if she ever becomes fond enough of him so that their union is made real. False kindness was sure well manipulated overlaid with secrets and soft words - those who take what they want have a charm about them that makes the betrayal all the more cruel and despicable - society has changed some so that she would not be forced into such narrow choices for her and her child's future - interesting how we all fantasize about what could have been. But then that is commenting on the story-line as presented where as the entire story could easily be an allegory for nature and the greed and ruthless behavior of man versus those who protect and allow nature its existence. But then like Mr. Royal you have to come home and not only acknowledge but accept and nurture your relationship with nature.   

BarbStAubrey

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6133 on: September 09, 2017, 05:33:24 AM »

Curl up and read with us our Fall selection. The Warden starts in October

The more you get into this time in history and the Anglican Church of England the more fun. There is so much background history, traditions, change and just life's goings on during the time of the publication, 1855. Learning as much as we can will be an adventure that will help us pick out the dry humor of Trollop and will highlight the sublet differences between the characters. This read is not the cozy afternoon cup of tea - the story is more like a game of chess with each character having their traditional space in which to move while change is blowing strong - in this simply story there is a lot going on.

The Plan for our discussion - We begin The Warden pre-discussion on Monday, October 2:

    October 2: Pre-Discussion with suggested Topics for Discussion
    October 9: Chapters 1-4
    October 16: Chapters 5-8
    October 23: Chapters 9-12
    October 30: Chapters 13-16
    November 6: Chapters 17-20
    November 11: Chapter 21 Finis

A link to the story will be in the heading however, if you are buying the book one of the better additions with background on the story and background on the author is the Oxford World's Classics addition - the Amazon Prime addition of the Oxford paperback edition is priced at $7.99


mabel1015j

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6134 on: September 21, 2017, 12:07:42 PM »
I'm reading The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant. I think someone in SL mentioned it, which got me interested. I know a lot of people liked The Red Tent, but I couldn't get into it. I really like TBG though, so I may go back to TRT and give it another try.

In TBG, Addie Baum, an 80-something granmother, is telling her 20-something grandgt about her life, which began in 1900 Boston. It is a well told history of the first half of the 20th century, with accuracy of the time, and humor. I got well pulled in by the emotional dynamics of the family and enjoyed the spunkiness AND doubt in Addie's personality.

Studying about a lot of women thru history, I've seen the trend that even the women who have been strongest in pushing their cause have at times wondered if they are behaving too progressively. (i. e., Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to graduate with a medical degree, who had pushed hard, being rejected by 30 medical colleges before she got into one, got the highest grades in several courses and graduated with honors, thought it was inappropriate to go onto the stage to collect her diploma. So her brother went up onstage to collect it for her.)

I'm also reading Terrible Virtue, a fictionalized story of Margaret Sanger's life. As I've said before, I think Margaret Sanger and Kathryn McCormick should have their birthdays celebrated by a nation who has a birth rate of about 2 children per family, instead of 7, 9, 13!!!!

I'm looking forward to duscussing it with our mother-dgt book group. I feel like the author is often reenforcing the negative aspects that the anti-planned parenthood people constantly talk about. But, I am so grateful to Sanger and McCormick that I may be too sensitive to that part of the story. Yeah, she was a socialist and free-love advocate, but for people who don't like those behaviors, I ask, "who is perfect?" The benefits she has brought us far outweigh those behaviors!

Jean

bellamarie

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Re: Fiction ~ Old ~ New ~ Best Sellers #2
« Reply #6135 on: September 21, 2017, 02:53:36 PM »
As a woman and Pro Life Christian, I could not disagree with you stronger.  Sanger is not a woman I could ever celebrate in any fashion.  By her own words she clearly was a racist, bigot and inhumane.

Sanger's own words:

“By all means, there should be no children when either mother or father suffers from such diseases as tuberculosis, gonorrhea, syphilis, cancer, epilepsy, insanity, drunkenness and mental disorders. In the case of the mother, heart disease, kidney trouble and pelvic deformities are also a serious bar to childbearing No more children should be born when the parents, though healthy themselves, find that their children are physically or mentally defective.” (“Woman and the New Race,” 1920, Chapter 7).
“The main objects of the Population Congress would be to apply a stern and rigid policy of sterilization and segregation to that grade of population whose progeny is tainted, or whose inheritance is such that objectionable traits may be transmitted to offspring[;] to give certain dysgenic groups in our population their choice of segregation or sterilization.” (“A Plan for Peace,” 1932).
In a 1957 interview with Mike Wallace, Sanger revealed: “I think the greatest sin in the world is bringing children into the world — that have disease from their parents, that have no chance in the world to be a human being practically. Delinquents, prisoners, all sorts of things just marked when they’re born. That to me is the greatest sin — that people can — can commit.”


This line of thinking from its founder has left lasting marks on the legacy of Planned Parenthood. For example, 79 percent of Planned Parenthood’s surgical abortion facilities are located within walking distance of black or Hispanic communities.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Abortion Surveillance report revealed that between 2007 and 2010, nearly 36 percent of all abortions in the United States were performed on black children, even though black Americans make up only 13 percent of our population. A further 21 percent of abortions were performed on Hispanics, and 7 percent more on other minority groups, for a total of 64 percent of U.S. abortions tragically performed on minority groups. Margaret Sanger would have been proud of the effects of her legacy.

Famous blacks of today see her as a racist, who wanted to do away with the black race.  In my opinion she is as bad as Adolf Hitler trying to do away with the Jews.  I am thrilled to see more and more Planned Parenthood centers close, and less tax payer's money used to help fund these abortion clinics.  Abortion is their ultimate goal, and their idea of birth control.  Everything else is a front. 
“What on earth could be more luxurious than a sofa, a book, and a cup of coffee?...Was ever anything so civil?”
__Anthony Trollope, The Warden